Imperial College London

ProfessorAndrewAmis

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7062a.amis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Fabienne Laperche +44 (0)20 7594 7033

 
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Location

 

713City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

430 results found

Halewood C, Risebury M, Thomas NP, Amis AAet al., 2014, Kinematic behaviour and soft tissue management in guided motion total knee replacement, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 3074-3082, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Hunt NC, Ghosh KM, Athwal KK, Longstaff LM, Amis AA, Deehan DJet al., 2014, Lack of evidence to support present medial release methods in total knee arthroplasty, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 3100-3112, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Stephen JM, Lumpaopong P, Dodds AL, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2014, The effect of progressive tibial tuberosity medialisation and lateralisation on patellofemoral joint kinematics, contact mechanics and stability, American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol: 43, Pages: 186-194, ISSN: 1552-3365

Background: Tibial tuberosity (TT) transfer is a common procedure to treat patellofemoral instability in patients with elevated TT–trochlear groove (TG) distances. However, the effects of TT lateralization or medialization on patellar stability, kinematics, and contact mechanics remain unclear.Hypothesis: Progressive medialization and lateralization will have increasingly adverse effects on patellofemoral joint kinematics, contact mechanics, and stability.Study Design: Controlled laboratory study.Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were placed on a testing rig, with a fixed femur and tibia mobile through 90° of flexion. Individual quadriceps heads and the iliotibial band were separated and loaded with 205 N in anatomic directions using a weighted pulley system. Patellofemoral contact pressures and patellar tracking were measured at 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using pressure-sensitive film behind the patella and an optical tracking system. The intact knee was measured with and without a 10-N patellar lateral displacement load, and recordings were repeated after TT transfer of 5, 10, and 15 mm medially and laterally. Statistical analysis used repeated-measures analysis of variance, Bonferroni post hoc analysis, and Pearson correlations.Results: Tibial tuberosity lateralization significantly elevated lateral joint contact pressures, increased lateral patellar tracking, and reduced patellar stability (P < .048). There was a significant correlation between mean lateral contact pressure and the TT position (r = 0.810, P < .001) at 10°. Tibial tuberosity medialization reduced lateral contact pressures (P < .002) and did not elevate peak medial contact pressures (P > .11).Conclusion: Progressive TT lateralization elevated lateral contact pressures, increased lateral patellar tracking, and reduced patellar stability. Medial contact pressure and tracking did alter with progressive TT medialization, but t

Journal article

Barcellona MG, Morrissey MC, Milligan P, Amis AAet al., 2014, The effect of thigh muscle activity on anterior knee laxity in the uninjured and anterior cruciate ligament-injured knee, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 2821-2829, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Geraldes D, Hansen U, Amis A, 2014, A framework for parametric analysis of glenoid implant design, MECBioengineering 2014

Conference paper

Geraldes D, Hansen U, Jeffers J, Amis Aet al., 2014, A framework for parametric analysis of glenoid implant design, International Society for Technology in Arthroplasty 2014

Conference paper

Tuncer M, Hansen UN, Amis AA, 2014, Prediction of structural failure of tibial bone models under physiological loads: Effect of CT density-modulus relationships, MEDICAL ENGINEERING & PHYSICS, Vol: 36, Pages: 991-997, ISSN: 1350-4533

Journal article

Ghosh KM, Blain AP, Longstaff L, Rushton S, Amis AA, Deehan DJet al., 2014, Can we define envelope of laxity during navigated knee arthroplasty?, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 1736-1743, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Kittl C, Weiler A, Amis AA, 2014, Anterolateral rotatory instability: Anatomy, biomechanics, and reconstruction, Arthroskopie, Vol: 27, Pages: 170-176, ISSN: 0933-7946

Background: Anterolateral rotatory instability (ALRI) of the knee consists of a translational and rotational component. It is widely accepted that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency causes anterior tibial translation, but controversy exists regarding the peripheral structures restraining tibial internal rotation. These structures may be reconstructed using lateral extra-articular soft-tissue reconstruction. The principal behind these types of reconstruction is to tether the graft posterior to the transverse center of rotation, therefore, limiting internal tibial rotation and ultimately restraining the rotational component of the pivot shift test. Aim: The aim of the following paper is to provide a critical literature review regarding anatomy, biomechanics, and related types of reconstruction of the anterolateral side of the knee. Materials and methods: The article provides a critical review of the ALRI literature and takes into account the authors' own anatomical and biomechanical observations. Results: Based on this literature review, the anterolateral structures of the knee may be more important in restraining internal tibial rotation than previously thought. Conclusion: A combined intra-articular ACL and lateral extra-articular soft-tissue reconstruction may be desirable in revision ACL surgery and in patients presenting excessive ALRI following ACL rupture. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Journal article

Amis AA, Arendt E, Deehan D, Defoort DC, Dejour D, Fink C, van Gennip S, Goyal D, Groenen K, van Hellemondt GG, Lentinga A, Lumpaopong P, Kader D, Kampen AV, Koeter S, Rood A, Schimmel JJ, Schoetlle P, Stephen JM, Verdonschot N, Wymenga ABet al., 2014, The Medial Patellofemoral Ligament, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg

Book

Halewood C, Samuelsson K, Kopf S, Alentorn-Geli E, Musahl Vet al., 2014, How to do proper research, ESSKA Instructional Course Lecture Book Amsterdam 2014, Publisher: Springer, ISBN: 9783642539824

This book provides an update on a wide variety of hot topics in the field of knee surgery, sports trauma and arthroscopy, covering the latest developments in basic science and clinical and surgical methods.

Book chapter

Atallah L, Wiik A, Lo B, Cobb JP, Amis AA, Yang G-Zet al., 2014, Gait asymmetry detection in older adults using a light ear-worn sensor, PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT, Vol: 35, Pages: N29-N40, ISSN: 0967-3334

Journal article

Gupte CM, Schaerf DA, Sandison A, Bull AMJ, Amis AAet al., 2014, Neural Structures within Human Meniscofemoral Ligaments: A Cadaveric Study., ISRN Anatomy, Vol: 2014, ISSN: 2314-4726

Aim. To investigate the existence of neural structures within the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) of the human knee. Methods. The MFLs from 8 human cadaveric knees were harvested. 5 μm sections were H&E-stained and examined under light microscopy. The harvested ligaments were then stained using an S100 monoclonal antibody utilising the ABC technique to detect neural components. Further examination was performed on 60–80 nm sections under electron microscopy. Results. Of the 8 knees, 6 were suitable for examination. From these both MFLs existed in 3, only anterior MFLs were present in 2, and an isolated posterior MFL existed in 1. Out of the 9 MFLs, 4 demonstrated neural structures on light and electron microscopy and this was confirmed with S100 staining. The ultrastructure of these neural components was morphologically similar to mechanoreceptors. Conclusion. Neural structures are present in MFLs near to their meniscal attachments. It is likely that the meniscofemoral ligaments contribute not only as passive secondary restraints to posterior draw but more importantly to proprioception and may therefore play an active role in providing a neurosensory feedback loop. This may be particularly important when the primary restraint has reduced function as in the posterior cruciate ligament—deficient human knee.

Journal article

Newman SD, Lotfibakhshaiesh N, O'Donnell M, Walboomers XF, Horwood N, Jansen JA, Amis AA, Cobb JP, Stevens MMet al., 2014, Enhanced Osseous Implant Fixation with Strontium-Substituted Bioactive Glass Coating, TISSUE ENGINEERING PART A, Vol: 20, Pages: 1850-1857, ISSN: 1937-3341

The use of endosseous implants is firmly established in skeletal reconstructive surgery, with rapid and permanent fixation of prostheses being a highly desirable feature. Implant coatings composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) have become the standard and have been used with some success in prolonging the time to revision surgery, but aseptic loosening remains a significant issue. The development of a new generation of more biologically active coatings is a promising approach for tackling this problem. Bioactive glasses are an ideal candidate material due to the osteostimulative properties of their dissolution products. However, to date, they have not been formulated with stability to devitrification or thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) that are suitable for stable coating onto metal implants while still retaining their bioactive properties. Here, we present a strontium-substituted bioactive glass (SrBG) implant coating which has been designed to encourage peri-implant bone formation and with a TEC similar to that of HA. The coating can be successfully applied to roughened Ti6Al4V and after implantation into the distal femur and proximal tibia of twenty-seven New Zealand White rabbits for 6, 12, or 24 weeks, it produced no adverse tissue reaction. The glass dissolved over a 6 week period, stimulating enhanced peri-implant bone formation compared with matched HA coated implants in the contralateral limb. Furthermore, superior mechanical fixation was evident in the SrBG group after 24 weeks of implantation. We propose that this coating has the potential to enhance implant fixation in a variety of orthopedic reconstructive surgery applications.

Journal article

Kondo E, Merican AM, Yasuda K, Amis AAet al., 2014, Biomechanical Analysis of Knee Laxity With Isolated Anteromedial or Posterolateral Bundle-Deficient Anterior Cruciate Ligament, ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY, Vol: 30, Pages: 335-343, ISSN: 0749-8063

Journal article

Dodds AL, Halewood C, Gupte CM, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2014, The anterolateral ligament ANATOMY, LENGTH CHANGES AND ASSOCIATION WITH THE SEGOND FRACTURE, BONE & JOINT JOURNAL, Vol: 96B, Pages: 325-331, ISSN: 2049-4394

Journal article

Stoddard JE, Deehan DJ, Bull AMJ, McCaskie AW, Amis AAet al., 2014, No difference in patellar tracking between symmetrical and asymmetrical femoral component designs in TKA, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 534-542, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Merican AM, Ghosh KM, Baena FRY, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2014, Patellar thickness and lateral retinacular release affects patellofemoral kinematics in total knee arthroplasty, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 526-533, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Stephen JM, Kader D, Lumpaopong P, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2014, The Effect of Femoral Tunnel Position and Graft Tension on Patellar Contact Mechanics and Kinematics After Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol: 42, Pages: 364-372, ISSN: 0363-5465

Journal article

Gregory T, Hansen U, Khanna M, Mutchler C, Urien S, Amis AA, Augereau B, Emery Ret al., 2014, A CT scan protocol for the detection of radiographic loosening of the glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty, ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, Vol: 85, Pages: 91-96, ISSN: 1745-3674

Journal article

Hunt NC, Ghosh KM, Blain AP, Athwal KK, Rushton SP, Amis AA, Longstaff LM, Deehan DJet al., 2014, How does laxity after single radius total knee arthroplasty compare with the native knee?, J. Orthop. Res., Vol: 32, Pages: 1208-1213, ISSN: 1554-527X

Journal article

Athwal KK, Hunt NC, Davies AJ, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., Clinical biomechanics of instability related to total knee arthroplasty, Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN: 0268-0033

Journal article

Gregory TM, Sankey A, Augereau B, Vandenbussche E, Amis A, Emery R, Hansen Uet al., 2013, Accuracy of Glenoid Component Placement in Total Shoulder Arthroplasty and Its Effect on Clinical and Radiological Outcome in a Retrospective, Longitudinal, Monocentric Open Study, PLOS ONE, Vol: 8, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Amis AA, 2013, Unicondylar knee replacement and the cruciate ligaments, Small Implants in Knee Reconstruction, Pages: 17-27, ISBN: 9788847026544

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2013. All rights are reserved. This chapter mainly addresses the way in which the actions of the cruciate ligaments affect the kinematics of the tibiofemoral joint after unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR). Although it is normal practise to excise one or both of the cruciate ligaments during total knee arthroplasty (TKA), this reflects the fact that, historically, TKA patients were severely disabled by their arthritis and so they did not demand high levels of function: pain relief was paramount. The degree of degenerative change in these osteoarthritic knees was such that the anterior cruciate ligament was usually absent, following a combination of soft-tissue degenerative changes associated with chronic inflammation and mechanical destruction mechanisms, such as sawing by the edges of the osteophytes that had formed around the antero-distal outlet of the femoral intercondylar notch. This has never been the case with UKR, as in these patients, who are often younger, only one compartment of the knee has arthritic damage severe enough to require arthroplasty. Therefore, the implants are required to work in harmony with the other structures of the knee and ideally with a high level of function.

Book chapter

Wiik AV, Manning V, Strachan RK, Amis AA, Cobb JPet al., 2013, Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Enables Near Normal Gait at Higher Speeds, Unlike Total Knee Arthroplasty, JOURNAL OF ARTHROPLASTY, Vol: 28, Pages: 176-178, ISSN: 0883-5403

Journal article

Tuncer M, Cobb JP, Hansen UN, Amis AAet al., 2013, Validation of multiple subject-specific finite element models of unicompartmental knee replacement, MEDICAL ENGINEERING & PHYSICS, Vol: 35, Pages: 1457-1464, ISSN: 1350-4533

Journal article

Stephen JM, Kader D, Lumpaopong P, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2013, Sectioning the medial patellofemoral ligament alters patellofemoral joint kinematics and contact mechanics, JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Vol: 31, Pages: 1423-1429, ISSN: 0736-0266

Journal article

Kai S, Kondo E, Kitamura N, Kawaguchi Y, Inoue M, Amis AA, Yasuda Ket al., 2013, A quantitative technique to create a femoral tunnel at the averaged center of the anteromedial bundle attachment in anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1471-2474

Journal article

Lopomo N, Zaffagnini S, Amis AA, 2013, Quantifying the pivot shift test: a systematic review, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 21, Pages: 767-783, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Pal B, Puthumanapully PK, Amis AA, 2013, (ii) Biomechanics of implant fixation, Orthopaedics and Trauma, Vol: 27, Pages: 76-84, ISSN: 1877-1327

In joint replacement, stability of the implant is provided by a combination of the techniques adopted to fix the implant to the surrounding bone and the geometric features of the implant. Fixation techniques can either use cement or be cementless. Cemented fixation uses PMMA bone cement to grout the implant and bone together, while cementless fixation involves either a press-fit between the implant and bone, or specific design features that encourage bone growth into or onto the implant. Although both of these fixation techniques perform well in terms of longevity, each method functions better than the other in certain patient groups, and each has some positives and negatives. This article reports an overview of the fundamental aspects of the fixation techniques, their clinical advantages and disadvantages, associated clinical concerns and recent trends of fixation in clinical practice. This will be coupled with specific examples on how certain geometric features of an implant help in achieving initial and long-term stability and fixation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Journal article

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