Imperial College London

ProfessorAndrewAmis

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7062a.amis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Fabienne Laperche +44 (0)20 7594 7033

 
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Location

 

713City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

443 results found

Merican AM, Ghosh KM, Baena FRY, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2014, Patellar thickness and lateral retinacular release affects patellofemoral kinematics in total knee arthroplasty, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 22, Pages: 526-533, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Stephen JM, Kader D, Lumpaopong P, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2014, The Effect of Femoral Tunnel Position and Graft Tension on Patellar Contact Mechanics and Kinematics After Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol: 42, Pages: 364-372, ISSN: 0363-5465

Journal article

Gregory T, Hansen U, Khanna M, Mutchler C, Urien S, Amis AA, Augereau B, Emery Ret al., 2014, A CT scan protocol for the detection of radiographic loosening of the glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty, ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, Vol: 85, Pages: 91-96, ISSN: 1745-3674

Journal article

Hunt NC, Ghosh KM, Blain AP, Athwal KK, Rushton SP, Amis AA, Longstaff LM, Deehan DJet al., 2014, How does laxity after single radius total knee arthroplasty compare with the native knee?, J. Orthop. Res., Vol: 32, Pages: 1208-1213, ISSN: 1554-527X

Journal article

Athwal KK, Hunt NC, Davies AJ, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2014, Clinical biomechanics of instability related to total knee arthroplasty, Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN: 0268-0033

Journal article

Gregory TM, Sankey A, Augereau B, Vandenbussche E, Amis A, Emery R, Hansen Uet al., 2013, Accuracy of Glenoid Component Placement in Total Shoulder Arthroplasty and Its Effect on Clinical and Radiological Outcome in a Retrospective, Longitudinal, Monocentric Open Study, PLOS ONE, Vol: 8, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Amis AA, 2013, Unicondylar knee replacement and the cruciate ligaments, Small Implants in Knee Reconstruction, Pages: 17-27, ISBN: 9788847026544

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2013. All rights are reserved. This chapter mainly addresses the way in which the actions of the cruciate ligaments affect the kinematics of the tibiofemoral joint after unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR). Although it is normal practise to excise one or both of the cruciate ligaments during total knee arthroplasty (TKA), this reflects the fact that, historically, TKA patients were severely disabled by their arthritis and so they did not demand high levels of function: pain relief was paramount. The degree of degenerative change in these osteoarthritic knees was such that the anterior cruciate ligament was usually absent, following a combination of soft-tissue degenerative changes associated with chronic inflammation and mechanical destruction mechanisms, such as sawing by the edges of the osteophytes that had formed around the antero-distal outlet of the femoral intercondylar notch. This has never been the case with UKR, as in these patients, who are often younger, only one compartment of the knee has arthritic damage severe enough to require arthroplasty. Therefore, the implants are required to work in harmony with the other structures of the knee and ideally with a high level of function.

Book chapter

Wiik AV, Manning V, Strachan RK, Amis AA, Cobb JPet al., 2013, Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty enables near normal gait at higher speeds, unlike total knee arthroplasty, Journal of Arthroplasty, Vol: 28, Pages: 176-178, ISSN: 0883-5403

Top walking speed (TWS) was used to compare UKA with TKA. Two groups of 23 patients, well matched for age, gender, height and weight and radiological severity were recruited based on high functional scores, more than twelve months post UKA or TKA. These were compared with 14 preop patients and 14 normal controls. Their gait was measured at increasing speeds on a treadmill instrumented with force plates. Both arthroplasty groups were significantly faster than the preop OA group. TKA patients walked substantially faster than any previously reported series of knee arthroplasties. UKA patients walked 10% faster than TKA, although not as fast as the normal controls. Stride length was 5% greater and stance time 7% shorter following UKA — both much closer to normal than TKA. Unlike TKA, UKA enables a near normal gait one year after surgery.

Journal article

Tuncer M, Cobb JP, Hansen UN, Amis AAet al., 2013, Validation of multiple subject-specific finite element models of unicompartmental knee replacement, MEDICAL ENGINEERING & PHYSICS, Vol: 35, Pages: 1457-1464, ISSN: 1350-4533

Journal article

Stephen JM, Kader D, Lumpaopong P, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2013, Sectioning the medial patellofemoral ligament alters patellofemoral joint kinematics and contact mechanics, JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Vol: 31, Pages: 1423-1429, ISSN: 0736-0266

Journal article

Kai S, Kondo E, Kitamura N, Kawaguchi Y, Inoue M, Amis AA, Yasuda Ket al., 2013, A quantitative technique to create a femoral tunnel at the averaged center of the anteromedial bundle attachment in anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1471-2474

Journal article

Lopomo N, Zaffagnini S, Amis AA, 2013, Quantifying the pivot shift test: a systematic review, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 21, Pages: 767-783, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Pal B, Puthumanapully PK, Amis AA, 2013, (ii) Biomechanics of implant fixation, Orthopaedics and Trauma, Vol: 27, Pages: 76-84, ISSN: 1877-1327

In joint replacement, stability of the implant is provided by a combination of the techniques adopted to fix the implant to the surrounding bone and the geometric features of the implant. Fixation techniques can either use cement or be cementless. Cemented fixation uses PMMA bone cement to grout the implant and bone together, while cementless fixation involves either a press-fit between the implant and bone, or specific design features that encourage bone growth into or onto the implant. Although both of these fixation techniques perform well in terms of longevity, each method functions better than the other in certain patient groups, and each has some positives and negatives. This article reports an overview of the fundamental aspects of the fixation techniques, their clinical advantages and disadvantages, associated clinical concerns and recent trends of fixation in clinical practice. This will be coupled with specific examples on how certain geometric features of an implant help in achieving initial and long-term stability and fixation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Journal article

Van Arkel R, Amis A, 2013, (i) Basics of orthopaedic biomechanics, Orthopaedics and Trauma, Vol: 27, Pages: 67-75, ISSN: 1877-1327

An outline of the basic principles of orthopaedic biomechanics is presented. Joint moments, muscle moment arms, in vivo forces, contact stresses and joint stability are all discussed with recent clinical examples to demonstrate their importance. These clinical examples focus on the hip and the knee and include: the effects of femoral offset and reducing the abductor moment arm on hip arthroplasty, how the knee adduction moment causes an asymmetric load distribution between the condyles, the magnitude of in vivo forces and their implications for wear, the consequences of meniscectomy on cartilage contact stresses, extreme contact stresses caused by edge loading in hip replacements, the effect of femoral head size and capsular repair in total hip replacement stability, knee medial rotation and the role of the anterior cruciate ligament in joint stability. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Journal article

Alam M, Bull AMJ, Thomas RD, Amis AAet al., 2013, A Clinical Device for Measuring Internal-External Rotational Laxity of the Knee, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol: 41, Pages: 87-94, ISSN: 0363-5465

Journal article

Amis AA, 2013, Biomechanics of high tibial osteotomy, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 21, Pages: 197-205, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Strachan RK, Amis AA, 2013, The use of computer-assisted surgery during patellofemoral arthroplasty, Knee Surgery Using Computer Assisted Surgery and Robotics, Pages: 143-158, ISBN: 9783642314292

© ESSKA Executive Office Luxembourg Centre Médical - FNM 76, rue d’Eich 1460 Luxembourg. During total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) has a tendency to be considered as an afterthought despite the fact that the patella and trochlea of the femur are frequently involved in certain patterns of knee osteoarthritis and deformity. Indeed, the PFJ in arthroplasty is a well-documented source of complications including subluxations, dislocations, tilts and impingements which are associated with pain and poor function [8, 30]. Such issues should therefore not be dismissed lightly (Fig. 15.1). Archibeck et al. [3] found that patellar tilt or subluxation occurred in 45 % of primary TKAs. Baldini et al. [4] reported high rates of pain and fracture when patellar issues were ignored.

Book chapter

Stoddard JE, Deehan DJ, Bull AMJ, McCaskie AW, Amis AAet al., 2013, The kinematics and stability of single-radius versus multi-radius femoral components related to Mid-range instability after TKA, JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Vol: 31, Pages: 53-58, ISSN: 0736-0266

Journal article

Gregory T, Hansen U, Emery R, Amis AA, Mutchler C, Taillieu F, Augereau Bet al., 2012, Total shoulder arthroplasty does not correct the orientation of the eroded glenoid, ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, Vol: 83, Pages: 529-535, ISSN: 1745-3674

Journal article

Stephen JM, Lumpaopong P, Deehan DJ, Kader D, Amis AAet al., 2012, The Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Location of Femoral Attachment and Length Change Patterns Resulting From Anatomic and Nonanatomic Attachments, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol: 40, Pages: 1871-1879, ISSN: 0363-5465

Journal article

Amis AA, Edwards A, Apsingi S, 2012, Graft tunnel positioning during PCL reconstruction, The Knee Joint: Surgical Techniques and Strategies, Pages: 387-393, ISBN: 9782287993527

© Springer-Verlag France, Paris, 2012. All rights are reserved. This chapter will review the scientific and surgical literature relating to PCL reconstruction, which is a subject that has received relatively little attention and that remains a subject for debate. In order for a PCL reconstruction to be classed as successful objectively, it has to reduce the pathological posterior translation laxity at least close to 'normal'. Because of variability between people, normal is usually defi ned as being a match to the laxity measured on the contralateral knee, with the proviso that the other knee should itself not have a history of injury that could have aff ected its anterior-posterior (AP) translation laxity (1). Methods for objective measurement of tibial resting position and laxity with respect to the femur are beyond the scope of this chapter, but the reader should note the probability that PCL damage will aff ect the neutral resting position of the tibia, which usually drops posteriorly.

Book chapter

Amis AA, Robinson JR, 2012, The anatomy and biomechanics of the medial collateral ligament and posteromedial corner of the knee, The Knee Joint: Surgical Techniques and Strategies, Pages: 23-30, ISBN: 9782287993527

© Springer-Verlag France, Paris, 2012. All rights are reserved. The medial and posteromedial aspect of the knee has been studied much less than the posterolateral aspect. The underling reason for that relates to the greater healing potential of the medial collateral ligament (MCL), which means that medial injuries are often treated conservatively, so there has been less pressure to develop sophisticated methods to treat these structures surgically. A further contributor to this situation is the difference in the mechanical environment, which means that injuries may have differing impacts on function. However, because the clinician is always alert to the possibility of damage to the posterolateral structures, it may be the case that medial side injuries are not looked for, or that changes in rotational laxity are misdiagnosed.

Book chapter

Ghosh KM, Merican AM, Iranpour F, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2012, Length-change patterns of the collateral ligaments after total knee arthroplasty, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 20, Pages: 1349-1356, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Amis AA, 2012, The functions of the fibre bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament in anterior drawer, rotational laxity and the pivot shift, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 20, Pages: 613-620, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Atallah L, Wiik A, Jones GG, Lo B, Cobb JP, Amis A, Yang G-Zet al., 2012, Validation of an ear-worn sensor for gait monitoring using a force-plate instrumented treadmill, GAIT & POSTURE, Vol: 35, Pages: 674-676, ISSN: 0966-6362

Journal article

Alam M, Bull AMJ, Thomas RD, Amis AAet al., 2011, Measurement of Rotational Laxity of the Knee In Vitro Comparison of Accuracy Between the Tibia, Overlying Skin, and Foot, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol: 39, Pages: 2575-2581, ISSN: 0363-5465

Journal article

Baring TKA, Cashman PPM, Reilly P, Emery RJH, Amis AAet al., 2011, Rotator cuff repair failure in vivo: a radiostereometric measurement study, JOURNAL OF SHOULDER AND ELBOW SURGERY, Vol: 20, Pages: 1194-1199, ISSN: 1058-2746

Journal article

Dodds AL, Gupte CM, Neyret P, Williams AM, Amis AAet al., 2011, Extra-articular techniques in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction A LITERATURE REVIEW, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 93B, Pages: 1440-1448, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

Merican AM, Ghosh KM, Iranpour F, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2011, The effect of femoral component rotation on the kinematics of the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints after total knee arthroplasty, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 19, Pages: 1479-1487, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Raphael BS, Maak T, Cross MB, Plaskos C, Wickiewicz T, Amis A, Pearle Aet al., 2011, From wall graft to roof graft: reassessment of femoral posterior cruciate ligament positioning., Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ), Vol: 40, Pages: 479-484

In many technique guides for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, the PCL is depicted on the wall of the medial femoral condyle (MFC). We hypothesized that most of the anterolateral (AL) bundle originates on the roof of the intercondylar notch (ICN), not on the wall. Using a surgical navigation system, we delineated and morphed in the computer the entire PCL footprint-the AL bundle, the posteromedial (PM) bundle, and the Humphrey ligament (HL)-of 7 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. A clock face was defined in the en face view, with the 12-o'clock axis pointing anteriorly through the top of the notch and the roof being the region between 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock. The AL-bundle, PM-bundle, and HL positions were calculated in terms of this clock-face definition. Mean centroids (o'clock position) over all specimens of AL bundle, PM bundle, and HL were, respectively, 10:49, 9:43, and 9:00 on the left knee and 1:11, 2:17, and 3:00 on the right knee. Mean areas were 63 mm(2) (AL bundle), 63 mm(2) (PM bundle), and 45 mm(2) (HL). In 5 of the 7 specimens tested, 100% of the AL bundle originated on the roof of the ICN. Conversely, 66% of the PM bundle and 100% of the HL inserted on the wall of the MFC rather than on the intercondylar roof. Using computer navigation software, we determined that most of the AL bundle originates on the roof of the ICN and that the PM bundle is centered near the transition between the roof and the wall of the MFC. These findings contradict the depiction in most technique guides for PCL reconstruction. Implant companies and surgeons should modify their techniques to shift PCL graft tunnels from the wall of the MFC to the roof of the ICN.

Journal article

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