Imperial College London

ProfessorAndrewAmis

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7062a.amis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Fabienne Laperche +44 (0)20 7594 7033

 
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Location

 

713City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

443 results found

Apsingi S, Nguyen T, Bull AMJ, Unwin A, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2009, A comparison of modified Larson and 'anatomic' posterolateral corner reconstructions in knees with combined PCL and posterolateral corner deficiency, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 17, Pages: 305-312, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Merican AM, Ghosh KM, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2009, The Transpatellar Approach for the Knee in the Laboratory, JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Vol: 27, Pages: 330-334, ISSN: 0736-0266

Journal article

Merican AM, Kondo E, Amis AA, 2009, The effect on patellofemoral joint stability of selective cutting of lateral retinacular and capsular structures, JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS, Vol: 42, Pages: 291-296, ISSN: 0021-9290

Journal article

Chong DYR, Hansen UN, Amis AA, 2009, COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF FIXATION PERFORMANCE AND BONE RESORPTION OF TIBIAL PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION, ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference, Publisher: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS, Pages: 975-976

Conference paper

Kessler O, Bull AMJ, Amis AA, 2009, A method to quantify alteration of knee kinematics caused by changes of TKR positioning., Journal of Biomechanics, Vol: 42, Pages: 665-670

Journal article

Masouros SD, Parker KH, Hill AM, Amis AA, Bull AMJet al., 2009, Testing and modelling of soft connective tissues of joints: a review, Journal of Strain Analysis for Engineering Design, Vol: 44, Pages: 305-318

There is wealth of data from experimental and numerical methods of analysing and modelling soft connective tissues of joints. In recent years, the advances in computational and technological capabilities allowed for several aspects of the function and mechanical behaviour of soft connective tissues of joints to be explored. However, the nature of soft tissue poses a great challenge in characterising its material behaviour in a repeatable and physiologically or clinically relevant manner. This review article attempts to present, critique and suggest experimental and numerical methods that are associated with the function and mechanical response of soft connective tissues of joints.

Journal article

Masouros SD, McDermott ID, Amis AA, AMJ Bet al., 2008, Biomechanics of the meniscus-meniscal ligament construct of the knee, KNEE SURG SPORT TR A, Vol: 16, Pages: 1121-1132, ISSN: 0942-2056

The menisci of the knee act primarily to redistribute contact force across the tibio-femoral articulation. This meniscal function is achieved through a combination of the material, geometry and attachments of the menisci. The main ligaments that attach the menisci to the tibia (insertional ligaments, deep medial collateral ligament), the femur (meniscofemoral ligaments, deep medial collateral ligament) and each other (the anterior intermeniscal ligament) are the means by which the contact force between tibia and femur is distributed into hoop stresses in the menisci to reduce contact pressure at the joint. This means that the functional biomechanics of the menisci cannot be considered in isolation and should be considered as the functional biomechanics of the meniscus-meniscal ligament construct. This article presents the current knowledge on the anatomy and functional biomechanics of the meniscus and its associated ligaments. Much is known about the function of the meniscus-meniscal ligament construct; however, there still remain significant gaps in the literature in terms of the properties of the anterior intermeniscal ligament and its function, the properties of the insertional ligaments, and the most appropriate ways to reconstruct meniscal function surgically.

Journal article

Amadi HO, Gupte CM, Lie DTT, McDermott ID, Amis AA, Bull AMJet al., 2008, A biomechanical study of the meniscofemoral ligaments and their contribution to contact pressure reduction in the knee, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, Vol: 16, Pages: 1004-1008, ISSN: 0942-2056

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) of the human knee assist the lateral meniscal function in reducing tibiofemoral contact pressure. Five human cadaveric knee joints were loaded in axial compression in extension using a 4-degree of freedom rig in a universal materials testing machine. Contact pressures pre- and post-sectioning of the MFLs were measured using pressure sensitive film. Sectioning the MFLs increased the contact pressure significantly in the joints for two of the four measures. In addition to their known function in assisting the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) to resist tibiofemoral posterior drawer, the MFLs also have a significant role in reducing contact stresses in the lateral compartment. Their retention in PCL and meniscal surgery is therefore to be advised.

Journal article

Dandachli W, 2008, Frames of Reference for Morphometric Analysis of the Hip Joint

Thesis dissertation

Bull AMJ, Kessler O, Alam M, Amis AAet al., 2008, Changes in knee kinematics reflect the articular geometry after arthroplasty, CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH, Vol: 466, Pages: 2491-2499, ISSN: 0009-921X

Journal article

Smith CD, Masouros S, Hill AM, Wallace AL, Amis AA, Bull AMJet al., 2008, Mechanical testing of intra-articular tissues. Relating experiments to physiological function, CURRENT ORTHOPAEDICS, Vol: 22, Pages: 341-348, ISSN: 0268-0890

Journal article

Brassart N, Sanghavi S, Hansen UN, Emery RJ, Amis AAet al., 2008, Loss of rotator cuff tendon-to-bone interface pressure after reattachment using a suture anchor, JOURNAL OF SHOULDER AND ELBOW SURGERY, Vol: 17, Pages: 784-789, ISSN: 1058-2746

Journal article

Ismail M, Karim A, Shulman R, Amis A, Calder Jet al., 2008, The Achillon achilles tendon repair: is it strong enough?, Foot Ankle Int, Vol: 29, Pages: 808-813, ISSN: 1071-1007

BACKGROUND: Open repair of the Achilles tendon is associated with wound breakdown, infection and percutaneous methods risk sural nerve injury. The Achillon mini-incision technique can reduce these risks and may provide the opportunity for early active rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to compare the strength of the Achillon method with the commonly used Kessler method and to assess whether the strength of the repair was related to tendon diameter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Simulated ruptures in sheep Achilles tendons were repaired using either the Achillon method or a two-strand Kessler technique with a No. 2 Ticron suture (Tyco Healthcare, UK). Each tendon diameter was measured, and matched for both groups. Specimens were loaded to failure using an Instron tensile testing machine (Instron Limited, UK). RESULTS: Mean load to failure for the Achillon repair was 153 N+/-60 (range, 65 to 270), and the mean load to failure for the Kessler Repair was 123 N+/-24 (range, 75 to 150). This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.21). There was a statistically significant higher mean load to failure for wider tendons repaired by the Achillon method (p=0.05), however mean load to failure was not related to tendon width in Kessler repairs (p=0.23). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to compare these two methods of repair. The Achillon repair has comparable tensile strength to the Kessler Repair. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The Achillon repair appears to be a biomechanically sound method of repair for the acutely ruptured Achilles tendon.

Journal article

Amis AA, Cuomo P, Rama RBS, Giron F, Bull AMJ, Thomas R, Aglietti Pet al., 2008, Measurement of Knee Laxity and Pivot-Shift Kinematics With Magnetic Sensors, Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics, Vol: 18, Pages: 196-203, ISSN: 1048-6666

This article describes work to develop a system to measure translational and rotational knee laxity and complex "dynamic" tests, such as the pivot-shift test, by the use of electromagnetic sensors mounted onto the limb segments with specially developed splints and clamps. We have measured in vitro and in vivo the motion of bone-mounted sensors versus skin-mounted sensors, and thus shown that there was an overall accuracy of approximately ±1 mm in translation and ±1° in rotation when the movements were relatively slow. It was found that, for clinical pivot-shift testing, the dynamic motion led to inaccuracy because of the inertia of the sensor mounting system, which led to the peaks of the sudden reduction motions not being measured; this system requires further development. We show that it also is possible to use this system in the clinic to record both rotational and translational knee laxity motions, both of which are integral to the pivot-shift instability. The force and torque were applied to the limb with sets of constant-force springs, which allowed the knee to be flexed while maintaining a constant load across the knee. This maneuver led to graphs showing the limits of translation and rotation laxity, across the range of knee flexion, for a series of 60 patients. It was then shown that the pivot-shift motion occurred within these laxity limits. The level of measurement accuracy means that the system described should be clinically useful. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Journal article

McDermott ID, Lie DTT, Edwards A, Bull AMJ, Amis AAet al., 2008, The effects of lateral meniscal allograft transplantation techniques on tibio-femoral contact pressures, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 16, Pages: 553-560, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

McDermott ID, Masouros SD, Amis AA, 2008, Biomechanics of the menisci of the knee, CURRENT ORTHOPAEDICS, Vol: 22, Pages: 193-201, ISSN: 0268-0890

Journal article

Hopkins AR, Hansen UN, Bull AM, Emery R, Amis AAet al., 2008, Fixation of the reversed shoulder prosthesis, J Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 2008

Journal article

Merican AM, Amis AA, 2008, Anatomy of the lateral retinaculum of the knee, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 90B, Pages: 527-534, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

Iranpour F, Merican AM, Amis AA, Cobb JPet al., 2008, The width:thickness ratio of the patella: an aid in knee arthroplasty., Clin Orthop Relat Res., Vol: 466(5), Pages: 1198-1203

Establishing the appropriate size of the patellar implant-bone composite is one of the important steps ensuring functional success in arthroplasty. Conventionally, the patella is measured intraoperatively and its thickness is used to guide the depth of resection. However, in a diseased joint, this may not reflect the native patellar thickness. We studied the relationship between the patellar thickness and various patellar dimensions on three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomographic scans from 37 normal adult knees. Patellar width correlated with thickness. The average patellar width:thickness ratio was 2.0 (standard deviation, 0.106; 95% confidence interval, 1.96-2.03). The cartilage thickness was on average 2.5 mm (standard deviation, 1.0). The width:thickness ratio was similar in 79 digital radiographs taken before TKA of knees without patellofemoral disease (mean, 2.1; standard deviation, 0.28). When compared with the two other methods for calculating patellar resection described in the literature, the width:thickness ratio was more reliable. The width:thickness ratio appears anatomically constant and may be a useful guide for estimating premorbid patellar thickness.

Journal article

Apsingi S, Nguyen T, Bull AMJ, Unwin A, Deehan DJ, Amis AAet al., 2008, The role of PCL reconstruction in knees with combined PCL and posterolateral corner deficiency, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 16, Pages: 104-111, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Al-Hadithi M, Hughes SPF, Amis AA, 2008, The effect of different insertion points on the security of pedicle screw fixation in bovine vertebrae, SPINE, Vol: 33, Pages: 169-172, ISSN: 0362-2436

Journal article

Edwards A, Bull AMJ, Amis AA, 2008, The attachments of the anteromedial and posterolateral fibre bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament - Part 2: Femoral attachment, KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, Vol: 16, Pages: 29-36, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Smith CD, Masouros SD, Hill AM, Wallace AL, Amis AA, Bull AMJet al., 2008, Tensile properties of the human glenoid labrum, JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, Vol: 212, Pages: 49-54, ISSN: 0021-8782

Journal article

Apsingi S, Nguyen T, Bull AMJ, Unwin A, Deehan D, Amis AAet al., 2008, The role of PCL reconstruction in knees with combined PCL and posterolateral corner deficiency, Knee Surg. Sports Traumatol. Arthrosc., Vol: 16, Pages: 104-111

Journal article

Amis AA, Oguz C, Bull AMJ, 2008, The effect of trochleoplasty on patellar stability and kinematics - a biomechanical study in-vitro, J. Bone Joint Surg - Br, Vol: 90-B, Pages: 864-869

Journal article

Cuomo P, Rama KRBS, Bull AMJ, Amis AAet al., 2007, The effects of different tensioning strategies on knee laxity and graft tension after double-bundle anterior Cruciate ligament reconstruction, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol: 35, Pages: 2083-2090, ISSN: 0363-5465

Journal article

Edwards A, Bull AM, Amis AA, 2007, The attachments of the anteromedial and posterolateral fibre bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament: Part 1: tibial attachment., Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc, Vol: 15, Pages: 1414-1421, ISSN: 0942-2056

The tibial attachments of the individual anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) fibre bundles and the entire attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament are described, relating them to consistent bony landmarks; 55 fresh-frozen specimens were measured. The fibre bundles were separated and excised at their attachments and their peripheries marked with a pen. High-resolution scaled digital photographs were taken of each dissected specimen and transferred onto a computer for analysis. A wide variation was found when using the posterior tibial axis, the anterior tibial surface and the medial tibial spine as reference points. The most consistent measurements used the tibial interspinous "over-the-back" ridge as a datum. The attachments of the PL and AM bundles were centred 10 +/- 1 mm (mean +/- SD) and 17 +/- 2 mm anterior to the over-the-back ridge. They were 4 +/- 1 and 5 +/- 1 mm, respectively, lateral to the medial tibial spine border. The positions of 6 mm circles in the posterior-medial limits of the fibre bundles (representing tunnels in a double-tunnel reconstruction) were measured. The overall dimensions of the tibial plateaux correlated significantly with many measurements. The results from this study could be used to guide ACL reconstruction techniques.

Journal article

Abdul-Kadir MR, Hansen UN, Klabunde R, Lucas D, Amis AAet al., 2008, Finite element modelling of primary hip stem stability: The effect of interference fit, Journal of Biomechanics

Journal article

Khan RT, Lie DT, Cashman PM, Thomas RW, Amis AAet al., 2007, Measurement of laxity in the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee: a comparison of three different methods in vitro, PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART H-JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE, Vol: 221, Pages: 653-663, ISSN: 0954-4119

Journal article

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