Imperial College London

ProfessorAndrewAmis

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7062a.amis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Fabienne Laperche +44 (0)20 7594 7033

 
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Location

 

713City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Kedroff:2019:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.03.014,
author = {Kedroff, L and Galea, Holmes MN and Amis, A and Newham, DJ},
doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.03.014},
journal = {Gait Posture},
pages = {361--369},
title = {Effect of patellofemoral pain on foot posture and walking kinematics.},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.03.014},
volume = {70},
year = {2019}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Background Excessive pronation has been implicated in patellofemoral pain (PFP) aetiology and foot orthoses are commonly prescribed for PFP patients. Pronation can be assessed using foot posture tests, however, the utility of such tests depends on their association with foot and lower-limb kinematics. Research questions Do PFP participants compared with healthy participants (1) have a more pronated foot measured with static foot tests and a kinematic multi-segmental foot model and (2) is there an association between static foot posture and foot and lower limb kinematics during walking? Methods A case-control study including 22 participants (n = 11 PFP, 5 females per group, aged 24 ± 3 (mean ± SD) years) was conducted. Foot posture measures included Arch Height Ratio, Navicular Drop (ND), and Foot Posture Index. Between-group comparisons of foot posture, segment and joint angle magnitudes, and associations between foot posture and kinematic data during gait were evaluated. Results There were no group differences in foot posture tests and mean joint angles. PFP participants had greater internal rotation of the shank and rearfoot segments, and adduction of the mid- and forefoot in the transverse plane (all p < 0.05). Greater ND was associated with increased forefoot abduction (rho=-0.68, p = 0.02) in healthy participants but no relationships were found between foot posture and kinematics in PFP participants. Significance Foot posture and kinematic data did not indicate excessive pronation in PFP participants questioning the use of orthoses to correct pronation. Larger studies are needed to determine the utility of foot posture tests as indicators of gait abnormalities in PFP.
AU - Kedroff,L
AU - Galea,Holmes MN
AU - Amis,A
AU - Newham,DJ
DO - 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.03.014
EP - 369
PY - 2019///
SP - 361
TI - Effect of patellofemoral pain on foot posture and walking kinematics.
T2 - Gait Posture
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.03.014
UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30959427
VL - 70
ER -