Imperial College London

ProfessorAndrewAmis

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7062a.amis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Fabienne Laperche +44 (0)20 7594 7033

 
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Location

 

713City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

443 results found

Athwal KK, Willinger L, Shinohara S, Ball S, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2020, The bone attachments of the medial collateral and posterior oblique ligaments are defined anatomically and radiographically, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 0942-2056

PurposeTo define the bony attachments of the medial ligaments relative to anatomical and radiographic bony landmarks, providing information for medial collateral ligament (MCL) surgery.MethodThe femoral and tibial attachments of the superficial MCL (sMCL), deep MCL (dMCL) and posterior oblique ligament (POL), plus the medial epicondyle (ME) were defined by radiopaque staples in 22 knees. These were measured radiographically and optically; the precision was calculated and data normalised to the sizes of the condyles. Femoral locations were referenced to the ME and to Blumensaat’s line and the posterior cortex.ResultsThe femoral sMCL attachment enveloped the ME, centred 1 mm proximal to it, at 37 ± 2 mm (normalised at 53 ± 2%) posterior to the most-anterior condyle border. The femoral dMCL attachment was 6 mm (8%) distal and 5 mm (7%) posterior to the ME. The femoral POL attachment was 4 mm (5%) proximal and 11 mm (15%) posterior to the ME. The tibial sMCL attachment spread from 42 to 71 mm (81–137% of A-P plateau width) below the tibial plateau. The dMCL fanned out anterodistally to a wide tibial attachment 8 mm below the plateau and between 17 and 39 mm (33–76%) A-P. The POL attached 5 mm below the plateau, posterior to the dMCL. The 95% CI intra-observer was ± 0.6 mm, inter-observer ± 1.3 mm for digitisation. The inter-observer ICC for radiographs was 0.922.ConclusionThe bone attachments of the medial knee ligaments are located in relation to knee dimensions and osseous landmarks. These data facilitate repairs and reconstructions that can restore physiological laxity and stability patterns across the arc of knee flexion.

Journal article

Williams A, Becker R, Amis A, 2020, The medial collateral ligament: the neglected ligament, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN: 0942-2056

Journal article

Willinger L, Shinohara S, Athwal KK, Ball S, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2020, Length-change patterns of the medial collateral ligament and posterior oblique ligament in relation to their function and surgery, Arthroskopie, Vol: 33, Pages: 288-294, ISSN: 0933-7946

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to define the length-change patterns of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL), deep MCL (dMCL), and posterior oblique ligament (POL) across knee flexion and with applied anterior and rotational loads.Material and methodsTen cadaveric knees were mounted in a kinematics rig with loaded quadriceps and hamstrings muscles. Length change patterns of the anterior and posterior fibres of the sMCL, dMCL and POL were recorded from 0 to 100° flexion. Length changes were recorded while a 90 N anterior load and a 5 Nm internal and external rotational torque were applied. Length changes were normalized to lengths at 0° flexion.ResultsThe anterior sMCL tightened as the knee was flexed (p < 0.01), and further tensioned under tibial external rotation (p < 0.001). Conversely, the posterior sMCL slackened with flexion (p < 0.001), while internal rotation tightened these fibers between 10 and 100° (p < 0.05). Tibial external rotation significantly lengthened the anterior dMCL fibres by 10% compared to the unloaded condition throughout flexion (p < 0.001). Release of the sMCL caused the dMCL fibres to become taut and increased valgus rotation (p < 0.01). The lengths of the anterior and posterior POL fibres decreased continuously with knee flexion (p < 0.001). Tibial internal rotation significantly increased the length of the POL (p < 0.001).ConclusionThe structures of the medial ligament complex reacted differently to knee flexion and applied loads. Structures attaching proximal and posterior to the medial epicondyle were taut in extension, whereas the anterior sMCL tensioned during flexion. The anterior dMCL was extensively strained by tibial external rotation and after sMCL release.

Journal article

Ball S, Stephen JM, El-Daou H, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2020, The medial ligaments and the ACL restrain anteromedial laxity of the knee, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0942-2056

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of each of the ACL and medial ligament structures in resisting anteromedial rotatory instability (AMRI) loads applied in vitro.MethodsTwelve knees were tested using a robotic system. It imposed loads simulating clinical laxity tests at 0° to 90° flexion: ±90 N anterior–posterior force, ±8 Nm varus–valgus moment, and ±5 Nm internal–external rotation, and the tibial displacements were measured in the intact knee. The ACL and individual medial structures—retinaculum, superficial and deep medial collateral ligament (sMCL and dMCL), and posteromedial capsule with oblique ligament (POL + PMC)—were sectioned sequentially. The tibial displacements were reapplied after each cut and the reduced loads required allowed the contribution of each structure to be calculated.ResultsFor anterior translation, the ACL was the primary restraint, resisting 63–77% of the drawer force across 0° to 90°, the sMCL contributing 4–7%. For posterior translation, the POL + PMC contributed 10% of the restraint in extension; other structures were not significant. For valgus load, the sMCL was the primary restraint (40–54%) across 0° to 90°, the dMCL 12%, and POL + PMC 16% in extension. For external rotation, the dMCL resisted 23–13% across 0° to 90°, the sMCL 13–22%, and the ACL 6–9%.ConclusionThe dMCL is the largest medial restraint to tibial external rotation in extension. Therefore, following a combined ACL + MCL injury, AMRI may persist if there is inadequate healing of both the sMCL and dMCL, and MCL deficiency increases the risk of ACL graft failure.

Journal article

Amis A, Willinger L, Shinohara S, Athwal K, Ball S, Williams Aet al., 2020, Length change patterns of the medial collateral ligament and posterior oblique ligament in relation to their function and surgery, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, ISSN: 0942-2056

PurposeTo define the length-change patterns of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL), deep MCL (dMCL), and posterior oblique ligament (POL) across knee flexion and with applied anterior and rotational loads, and to relate these findings to their functions in knee stability and to surgical repair or reconstruction.MethodsTen cadaveric knees were mounted in a kinematics rig with loaded quadriceps, ITB, and hamstrings. Length changes of the anterior and posterior fibres of the sMCL, dMCL, and POL were recorded from 0° to 100° flexion by use of a linear displacement transducer and normalised to lengths at 0° flexion. Measurements were repeated with no external load, 90 N anterior draw force, and 5 Nm internal and 5 Nm external rotation torque applied.ResultsThe anterior sMCL lengthened with flexion (p < 0.01) and further lengthened by external rotation (p < 0.001). The posterior sMCL slackened with flexion (p < 0.001), but was lengthened by internal rotation (p < 0.05). External rotation lengthened the anterior dMCL fibres by 10% throughout flexion (p < 0.001). sMCL release allowed the dMCL to become taut with valgus rotation (p < 0.001). The anterior and posterior POL fibres slackened with flexion (p < 0.001), but were elongated by internal rotation (p < 0.001).ConclusionThe structures of the medial ligament complex react differently to knee flexion and applied loads. Structures attaching posterior to the medial epicondyle are taut in extension, whereas the anterior sMCL, attaching anterior to the epicondyle, is tensioned during flexion. The anterior dMCL is elongated by external rotation. These data offer the basis for MCL repair and reconstruction techniques regarding graft positioning and tensioning.

Journal article

Amis A, Joseph M, Carmont M, Stephen J, Tailor Het al., 2020, Total knee arthroplasty reduces knee extension torque in-vitro and patellofemoral arthroplasty does not, Journal of Biomechanics, Vol: 104, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 0021-9290

Patients often have difficulty recovering knee extension strength post total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and that may reflect alteration of the mechanics including geometry and rollback kinematics, so the purpose of this work was to explore this by comparing the knee extension torque (KET) of the native knee, TKA and patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) in response to quadriceps tension. Eight fresh-frozen knees were mounted in a knee extension rig with quadriceps loading and tibial extension torque measurement. Each knee was subject to four conditions: native knee, PFA, cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA. The KET was measured from 120° to 0° knee flexion. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. The native KET was lowest in terminal extension and 70–100° flexion, and maximal at 20–30° flexion. PFA produced the greatest KET (p < 0.008) compared with native, CR- and PS-TKA, at 30–40° flexion. CR- and PS-TKA had lower KET across 0–50° flexion (p < 0.001 across 0–30°), falling to 25% of the native knee KET or the PFA at full extension. PFA had the highest KET in early flexion possibly due to increased trochlear offset and/or preservation of the cruciate mechanism, so PFA may be more beneficial during the functional range of motion. The claimed benefits of PS- over CR-TKA in deep flexion were not detected. Both CR- and PS-TKAs led to lower KET than the native and PFA knee states across 0–50° flexion. This mechanical effect may help to explain clinical findings of knee extension weakness post-TKA.

Journal article

Athwal KK, Willinger L, Manning W, Deehan D, Amis AAet al., 2020, A constrained-condylar fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty is stabilised by the medial soft tissues, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, ISSN: 0942-2056

PurposeRevision constrained-condylar total knee arthroplasty (CCK-TKA) is often used to provide additional mechanical constraint after failure of a primary TKA. However, it is unknown how much this translates to a reliance on soft-tissue support. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the laxity of a native knee to the CCK-TKA implanted state and quantify how medial soft-tissues stabilise the knee following CCK-TKA.MethodsTen intact cadaveric knees were tested in a robotic system at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° flexion with ± 90 N anterior–posterior force, ± 8 Nm varus-valgus and ± 5 Nm internal–external torques. A fixed-bearing CCK-TKA was implanted and the laxity tests were repeated with the soft tissues intact and after sequential cutting. The deep and superficial medial collateral ligaments (dMCL, sMCL) and posteromedial capsule (PMC) were sequentially transected and the percentage contributions of each structure to restraining the applied loads were calculated.ResultsImplanting a CCK-TKA did not alter anterior–posterior laxity from that of the original native knee, but it significantly decreased internal–external and varus-valgus rotational laxity (p < 0.05). Post CCK-TKA, the sMCL restrained 34% of the tibial displacing load in anterior drawer, 16% in internal rotation, 17% in external rotation and 53% in valgus, across the flexion angles tested. The dMCL restrained 11% of the valgus rotation moment.ConclusionsWith a fully-competent sMCL in-vitro, a fixed-bearing CCK-TKA knee provided more rotational constraint than the native knee. The robotic test data showed that both the soft-tissues and the semi-constrained implant restrained rotational knee laxity. Therefore, in clinical practice, a fixed-bearing CCK-TKA knee could be indicated for use in a knee with lax, less-competent medial soft tissues.

Journal article

Athwal KK, Lord BR, Milner PE, Gutteridge A, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2020, Redesigning metal interference screws can improve ease of insertion while maintaining fixation of soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction grafts, Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Rehabilitation, Vol: 2, Pages: e137-e144, ISSN: 2666-061X

Purpose: To compare the fixation strength and loads on insertion of a titanium alloy interference screw with a modified tip against a conventional titanium interference screw. Methods: Slippage of bovine digital extensor tendons (as substitutes for human tendon grafts) under cyclic loading and interference fixation strength under a pullout test were recorded in 10 cadaveric knees, with 2 tunnels drilled in each femur and tibia to provide pair-wise comparisons between the modified-tip screw (MS) and conventional screw (CS). To analyze screw insertion, 10 surgeons blindly inserted pairs of the MS and CS into bone-substitute blocks (with polyester shoelaces as graft substitutes), with insertion loads measured using a force/torque sensor. Results: No differences were found between the MS and CS either in graft slippage from the femur (P = .661) or tibia (P = .950) or in ultimate load to failure from the femur (P = .952) or tibia (P = .126). On insertion, the MS required less axial force application (78 ± 38 N, P = .001) and fewer attempted turns (2 ± 1, P < .001) to engage with the bone tunnel than the CS (99 ± 43 N and 4 ± 4, respectively). In 90% of the paired insertion tests, the screw identified by the surgeon as being easier to initially insert was the MS. Conclusions: The MS was found to be easier to engage with the bone tunnel and initially insert than the CS while still achieving similar immediate postsurgical fixation strength. Clinical Relevance: The study shows that screw designs can be improved to ease insertion into a bone tunnel, which should reduce any likelihood of ligament reconstruction graft damage.

Journal article

Lagae KC, Robberecht J, Athwal KK, Verdonk PCM, Amis AAet al., 2020, ACL reconstruction combined with lateral monoloop tenodesis can restore intact knee laxity, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, Vol: 28, Pages: 1159-1168, ISSN: 0942-2056

PurposeAn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is often combined with injury to the lateral extra-articular structures, which may cause a combined anterior and rotational laxity. It was hypothesised that addition of a ‘monoloop’ lateral extra-articular tenodesis (mLET) to an ACL reconstruction would restore anteroposterior, internal rotation and pivot-shift laxities better than isolated ACL reconstruction in combined injuries.MethodTwelve cadaveric knees were tested, using an optical tracking system to record the kinematics through 0°–100° of knee flexion with no load, anterior and posterior translational forces (90 N), internal and external rotational torques (5 Nm), and a combination of an anterior translational (90 N) plus internal rotational load (5 Nm). They were tested intact, after sectioning the ACL, sectioning anterolateral ligament (ALL), iliotibial band (ITB) graft harvest, releasing deep ITB fibres, hamstrings tendon ACL reconstruction, mLET combined with ACL reconstruction, and isolated mLET. Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA compared laxity data across knee states and flexion angles. When differences were found, paired t tests with Bonferroni correction were performed.ResultsIn the ACL-deficient knee, cutting the ALL significantly increased anterior laxity only at 20°–30°, and only significantly increased internal rotation at 50°. Additional deep ITB release significantly increased anterior laxity at 40°–90° and caused a large increase of internal rotation at 20°–100°. Isolated ACL reconstruction restored anterior drawer, but significant differences remained in internal rotation at 30°–100°. After adding an mLET there were no remaining differences with anterior translation or internal rotation compared to the intact knee. With the combined injury, isolated mLET allowed abnormal anterior translation and rotation to persist.ConclusionsCutting the deep fibres of the ITB

Journal article

Huber C, Zhang Q, Taylor WR, Amis AA, Smith C, Hosseini Nasab SHet al., 2020, Properties and function of the medial patellofemoral ligament: A systematic review, American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol: 48, Pages: 754-766, ISSN: 0363-5465

BACKGROUND: As the main passive structure preventing patellar lateral subluxation, accurate knowledge of the anatomy, material properties, and functional behavior of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is critical for improving its reconstruction. PURPOSE: To provide a state-of-the-art understanding of the properties and function of the MPFL by undertaking a systematic review and statistical analysis of the literature. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: On June 26, 2018, data for this systematic review were obtained by searching PubMed and Scopus. Articles containing numerical information regarding the anatomy, mechanical properties, and/or functional behavior of the MPFL that met the inclusion criteria were reviewed, recorded, and statistically evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 55 articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. The MPFL presented as a fanlike structure spanning from the medial femoral epicondyle to the medial border of the patella. The reported data indicated ultimate failure loads from 72 N to 208 N, ultimate failure elongation from 8.4 mm to 26 mm, and stiffness values from 8.0 N/mm to 42.5 N/mm. In both cadaveric and in vivo studies, the average elongation pattern demonstrated close to isometric behavior of the ligament in the first 50° to 60° of knee flexion, followed by progressive shortening into deep flexion. Kinematic data suggested clear lateralization of the patella in the MPFL-deficient knee during early knee flexion under simulated muscle forces. CONCLUSION: A lack of knowledge regarding the morphology and attachment sites of the MPFL remains. The reported mechanical properties also lack consistency, thus requiring further investigations. However, the results regarding patellar tracking confirm that the lack of an MPFL leads to lateralization of the patella, followed by delayed engagement of the trochlear groove, plausibly leading to an increased risk of patellar dislocations. The observed isometric behavior up to

Journal article

Hoogeslag RAG, Brouwer RW, Huis In 't Veld R, Amis AAet al., 2020, Letter to the Editor on "Anterior cruciate ligament repair versus reconstruction: A kinematic analysis"., Knee, Vol: 27, Pages: 609-610, ISSN: 0968-0160

Journal article

Eljaja SB, Konradsen L, Siersma VD, Athwal K, Amis AA, Krogsgaard MRet al., 2020, Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate- and anterolateral ligament deficient knee with a modified iliotibial graft reduces instability more than with an intra-articular hamstring graft, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, Vol: 28, Pages: 2526-2534, ISSN: 0942-2056

PURPOSE: To compare knee kinematics before and after anterior cruciate ligament ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) using hamstring graft (HG) and a double-stranded iliotibial tract graft attached to Gerdy's tubercle (providing an extra-articular anterolateral tenodesis) (named the modified iliotibial tract graft = MIT). METHOD: Eighteen cadaveric knees were tested in a 6 degree of freedom kinematics rig. An optical tracking system recorded kinematics of the knee from 0 to 80 degrees of flexion applying no load, internal/external rotation (IR/ER), valgus/varus rotation (VGR/VRR), simulated pivot shift (SPS), anterior translation (AT) and posterior translation loads. The knee was tested before and after resection of the ACL and the anterolateral ligament (ALL), respectively; then after HG-ACL-R and MIT-ACL-R. Grafts were fixed at 20° of flexion. Results were compared to the intact knee. RESULTS: ACL resection resulted in a significant increase in AT (p < 0.05) over the entire range of motion, peaking at 20° of flexion, mean difference 6.6 ± 2.25 mm (p = 0.0007). ACL-R with HG-ACL and MIT-ACL restored AT. Resection of the ALL increased IR in the fully extended knee, mean difference 2.4 ± 2.1° (p = 0.024). When compared to the intact knee and the knee after HG-ACL-R, MIT-ACL-R knee reduced IR/SPS significantly (p < 0.05) in deep flexion angles (60°-80°), peaking at 80° of flexion. The MIT-ACL-R caused significantly less VRR at 80° flexion (p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: MIT-ACL-R restored AT equally to the HG-ACL-R. The MIT-ACL-R reduced IR and SPS in deep flexion, resulting in overconstraint. MIT-ACL-R can be used as an alternative to standard reconstruction methods.

Journal article

Hoogeslag RAG, Brouwer RW, Huis In 't Veld R, Amis AAet al., 2020, Isometric placement of the augmentation braid is not attained reliably in contemporary ACL suture repair, Knee, Vol: 27, Pages: 111-123, ISSN: 0968-0160

BACKGROUND: To assess if during arthroscopic braid-augmented ACL suture repair (ACLSR), the actual positions of the augmentation braids' tunnels corresponded with the positions of their intended and targeted isometric points, and to test the hypothesis that there would be no dispersion in actual positions of the augmentation braids' tunnels compared to their intended and targeted isometric points. METHODS: In 12 human cadaveric knees, the positions of the augmentation braids' tunnels and their intended and targeted isometric points relative to a femoral and tibial grid were analysed. Furthermore, vector length between these positions was calculated to assess the accuracy and precision of the augmentation braids' tunnel placement. RESULTS: There was dispersion for all of the augmentation braids' tunnel positions compared to their intended isometric points. The femoral and tibial vector lengths (mean ± SD (range)) were 2.9 ± 1.0 (1.1-4.1) and 7.1 ± 2.0 (3.2-9.8) mm respectively. CONCLUSION: In augmented ACLSR, with the ruptured ACL in situ, there was dispersion of the positions of the actual small diameter femoral and tibial augmentation braids' tunnels away from their desired isometric points. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The extent of dispersion of the position of both the femoral and tibial tunnels away from their intended isometric positions may cause cyclic length changes with knee motion. An ACLSR with static braid augmentation will thus be vulnerable to cyclic stretching-out. The difficulty of obtaining an isometric tunnel combination for the small diameter augmentation braid may influence the clinician's choice between non-, static or dynamic augmented ACLSR techniques.

Journal article

Marsland D, Stephen JM, Calder T, Amis AA, Calder JDFet al., 2020, Flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer to the navicular: tendon-to-tendon repair is stronger compared with interference screw fixation, Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, Vol: 28, Pages: 320-325, ISSN: 0942-2056

PURPOSE: To assess whether early rehabilitation could be safe after flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer, the current biomechanical study aimed to measure tendon displacement under cyclic loading and load to failure, comparing a traditional tendon-to-tendon (TT) repair with interference screw fixation (ISF). METHODS: 24 fresh-frozen cadaveric below knee specimens underwent FDL tendon transfer. In 12 specimens a TT repair was performed via a navicular bone tunnel. In a further 12 specimens ISF was performed. Using a materials testing machine, the FDL tendon was cycled 1000 times to 150 N and tendon displacement at the insertion site measured. A final load to failure test was then performed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and an independent t test, with a significance level of p < 0.05. RESULT: No significant difference in tendon displacement occurred after cyclic loading, with mean tendon displacements of 1.9 ± 1.2 mm (mean ± SD) in the TT group and 1.8 ± 1.5 mm in the ISF group (n.s.). Two early failures occurred in the ISF group, none in the TT group. Mean load to failure was significantly greater following TT repair (459 ± 96 N), compared with ISF (327 ± 76 N), p = 0.002. CONCLUSION: Minimal tendon displacement of less than 2 mm occurred during cyclic testing in both groups. The two premature failures and significantly reduced load to failure observed in the ISF group, however, indicate that the traditional TT technique is more robust. Regarding clinical relevance, this study suggests that early active range of motion and protected weight bearing may be safe following FDL tendon transfer for stage 2 tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction.

Journal article

Amis AA, 2019, The end of sports surgery, The Future of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: What Should We Be Worried About?, Pages: 55-56, ISBN: 9783030289751

Book chapter

Lord BR, El-Daou H, Zdanowicz U, Smigielski R, Amis AAet al., 2019, The role of fibers within the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament in restraining tibial displacement, ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY, Vol: 35, Pages: 2101-2111, ISSN: 0749-8063

PurposeTo evaluate the load-bearing functions of the fibers of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial attachment in restraining tibial anterior translation, internal rotation, and combined anterior and internal rotation laxities in a simulated pivot-shift test.MethodsTwelve knees were tested using a robot. Laxities tested were: anterior tibial translation (ATT), internal rotation (IR), and coupled translations and rotations during a simulated pivot-shift. The kinematics of the intact knee was replayed after sequentially transecting 9 segments of the ACL attachment and fibers entering the lateral gutter, measuring their contributions to restraining laxity. The center of effort (COE) of the ACL force transmitted to the tibia was calculated. A blinded anatomic analysis identified the densest fiber area in the attachment of the ACL and thus its centroid (center of area). This centroid was compared with the biomechanical COE.ResultsThe anteromedial tibial fibers were the primary restraint of ATT (84% across 0° to 90° flexion) and IR (61%) during isolated and coupled displacements, except for the pivot-shift and ATT in extension. The lateral gutter resisted 28% of IR at 90° flexion. The anteromedial fibers showed significantly greater restraint of simulated pivot-shift rotations than the central and posterior fibers (P < .05). No significant differences (all <2 mm) were found between the anatomic centroid of the C-shaped attachment and the COE under most loadings.ConclusionsThe peripheral anteromedial fibers were the most important area of the ACL tibial attachment in the restraint of tibial anterior translation and internal rotation during isolated and coupled displacements. These mechanical results matched the C-shaped anteromedial attachment of the dense collagen fibers of the ACL.Clinical RelevanceThe most important fibers in restraining tibial displacements attach to the C-shaped anteromedial area of the native ACL tibial attachment. This findi

Journal article

Devitt BM, Lord BR, Williams A, Amis AA, Feller JAet al., 2019, Biomechanical assessment of a distally fixed lateral extra-articular augmentation procedure in the treatment of anterolateral rotational laxity of the knee, American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol: 47, Pages: 2102-2109, ISSN: 0363-5465

Background:Most lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) procedures rely on passing a strip of the iliotibial band (ITB) under the fibular (lateral) collateral ligament and fixing it proximally to the femur. The Ellison procedure is a distally fixed lateral extra-articular augmentation procedure with no proximal fixation of the ITB. It has the potential advantages of maintaining a dynamic element of control of knee rotation and avoiding the possibility of overconstraint.Hypothesis:The modified Ellison procedure would restore native knee kinematics after sectioning of the anterolateral capsule, and closure of the ITB defect would decrease rotational laxity of the knee.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Twelve fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were tested in a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system through 0° to 90° of knee flexion to assess anteroposterior, internal rotation (IR), and external rotation laxities. A simulated pivot shift (SPS) was performed at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45° of flexion. Kinematic testing was performed in the intact knee and anterolateral capsule–injured knee and after the modified Ellison procedure, with and without closure of the ITB defect. A novel pulley system was used to load the ITB at 30 N for all testing states. Statistical analysis used repeated measures analyses of variance and paired t tests with Bonferroni adjustments.Results:Sectioning of the anterolateral capsule increased anterior drawer and IR during isolated displacement and with the SPS (mean increase, 2° of IR; P < .05). The modified Ellison procedure reduced both isolated and coupled IR as compared with the sectioned state (P < .05). During isolated testing, IR was reduced close to that of the intact state with the modified Ellison procedure, except at 30° of knee flexion, when it was slightly overconstrained. During the SPS, IR with the closed modified Ellison was less than that in the intact state at 15° and 30° of fl

Journal article

Athwal K, Milner P, Bellier G, Amis AAet al., 2019, Posterior capsular release is a biomechanically safe procedure to perform in total knee arthroplasty, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, Vol: 27, Pages: 1587-1594, ISSN: 0942-2056

PurposeSurgeons may attempt to strip the posterior capsule from its femoral attachment to overcome flexion contracture in total knee arthroplasty (TKA); however, it is unclear if this impacts anterior–posterior (AP) laxity of the implanted knee. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of posterior capsular release on AP laxity in TKA, and compare this to the restraint from the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL).MethodsEight cadaveric knees were mounted in a six degree of freedom testing rig and tested at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° flexion with ± 150 N AP force, with and without a 710 N axial compressive load. After the native knee was tested, a deep dished cruciate-retaining TKA was implanted and the tests were repeated. The PCL was then cut, followed by releasing the posterior capsule using a curved osteotome.ResultsWith 0 N axial load applied, cutting the PCL as well as releasing the posterior capsule significantly increased posterior laxity compared to the native knee at all flexion angles, and CR TKA states at 30°, 60° and 90° (p < 0.05). However, no significant increase in laxity was found between cutting the PCL and subsequent PostCap release (n.s.). In anterior drawer, there was a significant increase of 1.4 mm between cutting the PCL and PostCap release at 0°, but not at any other flexion angles (p = 0.021). When a 710 N axial load was applied, there was no significant difference in anterior or posterior translation across the different knee states (n.s.).ConclusionsPosterior capsular release only caused a small change in AP laxity compared to cutting the PCL and, therefore, may not be considered detrimental to overall AP stability if performed during TKA surgery.Level of evidenceControlled laboratory study.

Journal article

Amis AA, 2019, Editorial commentary: taking a wider view during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? the case for doing more than just reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament itself, ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY, Vol: 35, Pages: 1484-1485, ISSN: 0749-8063

Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may leave a residual instability. If other pathology is identified, the surgeon should consider doing more than the isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to address peripheral lesions to the menisci, ligaments, and capsule in selected cases.

Journal article

Kedroff L, Galea Holmes MN, Amis A, Newham DJet al., 2019, Effect of patellofemoral pain on foot posture and walking kinematics, Gait and Posture, Vol: 70, Pages: 361-369, ISSN: 0966-6362

Background Excessive pronation has been implicated in patellofemoral pain (PFP) aetiology and foot orthoses are commonly prescribed for PFP patients. Pronation can be assessed using foot posture tests, however, the utility of such tests depends on their association with foot and lower-limb kinematics. Research questions Do PFP participants compared with healthy participants (1) have a more pronated foot measured with static foot tests and a kinematic multi-segmental foot model and (2) is there an association between static foot posture and foot and lower limb kinematics during walking? Methods A case-control study including 22 participants (n = 11 PFP, 5 females per group, aged 24 ± 3 (mean ± SD) years) was conducted. Foot posture measures included Arch Height Ratio, Navicular Drop (ND), and Foot Posture Index. Between-group comparisons of foot posture, segment and joint angle magnitudes, and associations between foot posture and kinematic data during gait were evaluated. Results There were no group differences in foot posture tests and mean joint angles. PFP participants had greater internal rotation of the shank and rearfoot segments, and adduction of the mid- and forefoot in the transverse plane (all p < 0.05). Greater ND was associated with increased forefoot abduction (rho=-0.68, p = 0.02) in healthy participants but no relationships were found between foot posture and kinematics in PFP participants. Significance Foot posture and kinematic data did not indicate excessive pronation in PFP participants questioning the use of orthoses to correct pronation. Larger studies are needed to determine the utility of foot posture tests as indicators of gait abnormalities in PFP.

Journal article

Getgood A, Brown C, Lording T, Amis AA, Claes S, Geeslin A, Musahl Vet al., 2019, The anterolateral complex of the knee: results from the international ALC consensus group meeting, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, Vol: 27, Pages: 166-176, ISSN: 0942-2056

The structure and function of the anterolateral complex (ALC) of the knee has created much controversy since the ‘re-discovery’ of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and its proposed role in aiding control of anterolateral rotatory laxity in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee. A group of surgeons and researchers prominent in the field gathered to produce consensus as to the anatomy and biomechanical properties of the ALC. The evidence for and against utilisation of ALC reconstruction was also discussed, generating a number of consensus statements by following a modified Delphi process. Key points include that the ALC consists of the superficial and deep aspects of the iliotibial tract with its Kaplan fibre attachments on the distal femur, along with the ALL, a capsular structure within the anterolateral capsule. A number of structures attach to the area of the Segond fracture including the capsule-osseous layer of the iliotibial band, the ALL and the anterior arm of the short head of biceps, and hence it is not clear which is responsible for this lesion. The ALC functions to provide anterolateral rotatory stability as a secondary stabiliser to the ACL. Whilst biomechanical studies have shown that these structures play an important role in controlling stability at the time of ACL reconstruction, the optimal surgical procedure has not yet been defined clinically. Concern remains that these procedures may cause constraint of motion, yet no clinical studies have demonstrated an increased risk of osteoarthritis development. Furthermore, clinical evidence is currently lacking to support clear indications for lateral extra-articular procedures as an augmentation to ACL reconstruction. The resulting statements and scientific rationale aim to inform readers on the most current thinking and identify areas of needed basic science and clinical research to help improve patient outcomes following ACL injury and subsequent reconstruction.

Journal article

Correa T, Pal B, van Arkel R, Vanacore F, Amis AAet al., 2018, Reduced tibial strain-shielding with extraosseous total knee arthroplasty revision system, Medical Engineering and Physics, Vol: 62, Pages: 22-28, ISSN: 1350-4533

BackgroundRevision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) has poorer results than primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and the prostheses are invasive and cause strain-shielding of the bones near the knee. This paper describes an RTKA system with extracortical fixation. It was hypothesised that this would reduce strain-shielding compared with intramedullary fixation.MethodsTwelve replica tibiae were prepared for full-field optical surface strain analysis. They were either left intact, implanted with RTKA components with cemented intramedullary fixation stems, or implanted with a novel design with a tibial tray subframe supported by two extracortical fixation plates and screw fixation. They were loaded to simulate peak walking and stair climbing loads and the surface strains were measured using digital image correlation. The measurements were validated with strain gauge rosettes.ResultsCompared to the intact bone model, extracortical fixation reduced surface strain-shielding by half versus intramedullary fixation. For all load cases and bone regions examined, the extracortical implant shielded 8–27% of bone strain, whereas the intramedullary component shielded 37–56%.ConclusionsThe new fixation design, which offers less bone destruction than conventional RTKA, also reduced strain-shielding. Clinically, this design may allow greater rebuilding of bone loss, and should increase long-term fixation.

Journal article

Stephen JM, Sopher R, Tullie S, Amis AA, Ball S, Williams Aet al., 2018, The infrapatellar fat pad is a dynamic and mobile structure, which deforms during knee motion, and has proximal extensions which wrap around the patella, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, Vol: 26, Pages: 3515-3524, ISSN: 0942-2056

PURPOSE: The infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) is a common cause of knee pain and loss of knee flexion and extension. However, its anatomy and behavior are not consistently defined. METHODS: Thirty-six unpaired fresh frozen knees (median age 34 years, range 21-68) were dissected, and IFP attachments and volume measured. The rectus femoris was elevated, suprapatellar pouch opened and videos recorded looking inferiorly along the femoral shaft at the IFP as the knee was flexed. The patellar retinacula were incised and the patella reflected distally. The attachment of the ligamentum mucosum (LMuc) to the intercondylar notch was released from the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), both menisci and to the tibia via meniscotibial ligaments. IFP strands projecting along both sides of the patella were elevated and the IFP dissected from the inferior patellar pole. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of one knee at ten flexion angles was performed and the IFP, patella, tibia and femur segmented. RESULTS: In all specimens the IFP attached to the inferior patellar pole, femoral intercondylar notch (via the LMuc), proximal patellar tendon, intermeniscal ligament, both menisci and the anterior tibia via the meniscotibial ligaments. In 30 specimens the IFP attached to the anterior ACL fibers via the LMuc, and in 29 specimens it attached directly to the central anterior tibia. Proximal IFP extensions were identified alongside the patella in all specimens and visible on MRI [medially (100% of specimens), mean length 56.2 ± 8.9 mm, laterally (83%), mean length 23.9 ± 6.2 mm]. Mean IFP volume was 29.2 ± 6.1 ml. The LMuc, attached near the base of the middle IFP lobe, acting as a 'tether' drawing it superiorly during knee extension. The medial lobe consistently had a pedicle superomedially, positioned between the patella and medial trochlea. MRI scans demonstrated how the space between the anterior tibia and patellar t

Journal article

Hoogeslag RAG, Brouwer RW, Huis In 't Veld R, Stephen JM, Amis AAet al., 2018, Dynamic augmentation restores anterior tibial translation in ACL suture repair: a biomechanical comparison of non-, static and dynamic augmentation techniques, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, Vol: 26, Pages: 2986-2996, ISSN: 0942-2056

PURPOSE: There is a lack of objective evidence investigating how previous non-augmented ACL suture repair techniques and contemporary augmentation techniques in ACL suture repair restrain anterior tibial translation (ATT) across the arc of flexion, and after cyclic loading of the knee. The purpose of this work was to test the null hypotheses that there would be no statistically significant difference in ATT after non-, static- and dynamic-augmented ACL suture repair, and they will not restore ATT to normal values across the arc of flexion of the knee after cyclic loading. METHODS: Eleven human cadaveric knees were mounted in a test rig, and knee kinematics from 0° to 90° of flexion were recorded by use of an optical tracking system. Measurements were recorded without load and with 89-N tibial anterior force. The knees were tested in the following states: ACL-intact, ACL-deficient, non-augmented suture repair, static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation after 10 and 300 loading cycles. RESULTS: Only static tape augmentation and dynamic augmentation restored ATT to values similar to the ACL-intact state directly postoperation, and maintained this after cyclic loading. However, contrary to dynamic augmentation, the ATT after static tape augmentation failed to remain statistically less than for the ACL-deficient state after cyclic loading. Moreover, after cyclic loading, ATT was significantly less with dynamic augmentation when compared to static tape augmentation. CONCLUSION: In contrast to non-augmented ACL suture repair and static tape augmentation, only dynamic augmentation resulted in restoration of ATT values similar to the ACL-intact knee and decreased ATT values when compared to the ACL-deficient knee immediately post-operation and also after cyclic loading, across the arc of flexion, thus allowing the null hypotheses to be rejected. This may assist healing of the ruptured ACL. Therefore, this study would support further clinical evaluation of dyna

Journal article

Inderhaug E, Stephen JM, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2018, Effect of anterolateral complex sectioning and tenodesis on patellar kinematics and patellofemoral joint contact pressures, American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol: 46, Pages: 2922-2928, ISSN: 0363-5465

Background:Anterolateral complex injuries are becoming more recognized. While these are known to affect tibiofemoral mechanics, it is not known how they affect patellofemoral joint behavior.Purpose:To determine the effect of (1) sectioning the anterolateral complex and (2) performing a MacIntosh tenodesis under various conditions on patellofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were tested in a customized rig, with the femur fixed and tibia free to move, with optical tracking to record patellar kinematics and with thin pressure sensors to record patellofemoral contact pressures at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The quadriceps and iliotibial tract were loaded with 205 N throughout testing. Intact and anterolateral complex–sectioned states were tested, followed by 4 randomized tenodeses applying 20- and 80-N graft tension, each with the tibia in its neutral intact alignment or left free to rotate. Statistical analyses were undertaken with repeated measures analysis of variance, Bonferroni post hoc analysis, and paired samples t tests.Results:Patellar kinematics and contact pressures were not significantly altered after sectioning of the anterolateral complex (all: P > .05). Similarly, they were not significantly different from the intact knee in tenodeses performed when fixed tibial rotation was combined with 20- or 80-N graft tension (all: P > .05). However, grafts tensioned with 20 N and 80 N while the tibia was free hanging resulted in significant increases in lateral patellar tilt (P < .05), and significantly elevated lateral peak patellofemoral pressures (P < .05) were observed for 80 N.Conclusion:This work did not find that an anterolateral injury altered patellofemoral mechanics or kinematics, but adding a lateral tenodesis can elevate lateral contact pressures and induce lateral patellar tilting if the tibia is pulled into external ro

Journal article

Stephen J, Alva A, Lumpaopong P, Williams A, Amis AAet al., 2018, A cadaveric model to evaluate the effect of unloading the medial quadriceps on patellar tracking and patellofemoral joint pressure and stability, Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2197-1153

BackgroundVastus Medialis Muscles (VMM) damage has been widely identified following patellar dislocation. Rehabilitation programmes have been suggested to strengthen the VMM and reduce clinical symptoms of pain and instability. This controlled laboratory study investigated the hypothesis that reduced Vastus Medialis Obliquus (VMO) and Vastus Medialis Longus (VML) muscle tension would alter patellar tracking, stability and PFJ contact pressures.MethodsNine fresh-frozen dissected cadaveric knees were mounted in a rig with the quadriceps and iliotibial band loaded to 205 N. An optical tracking system measured joint kinematics and pressure sensitive film between the patella and trochlea measured PFJ contact pressures. Measurements were repeated for three conditions: 1. With all quadriceps heads and iliotibial band (ITB) loaded; 2. as 1, but with the VMO muscle unloaded and 3. as 1, but with the VMO and VML unloaded. Measurements were also repeated for the three conditions with a 10 N lateral displacement force applied to the patella.ResultsReduction of VMM tension resulted in significant increases in lateral patellar tilt (2.8°) and translation (4 mm), with elevated lateral and reduced medial joint contact pressures from 0.48 to 0.14 MPa, and reduced patellar stability (all p < 0.05).ConclusionsThese findings provide basic scientific rationale to support the role of quadriceps strengthening to resist patellar lateral maltracking and rebalance the articular contact pressure away from the lateral facet in patients with normal patellofemoral joint anatomy.

Journal article

Junaid S, Gregory T, Fetherston S, Emery R, Amis AA, Hansen Uet al., 2018, Cadaveric study validating in vitro monitoring techniques to measure the failure mechanism of glenoid implants against clinical CT, Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol: 36, Pages: 2524-2532, ISSN: 0736-0266

Definite glenoid implant loosening is identifiable on radiographs, however, identifying early loosening still eludes clinicians. Methods to monitor glenoid loosening in vitro have not been validated to clinical imaging. This study investigates the correlation between in vitro measures and CT images. Ten cadaveric scapulae were implanted with a pegged glenoid implant and fatigue tested to failure. Each scapulae were cyclically loaded superiorly and CT scanned every 20,000 cycles until failure to monitor progressive radiolucent lines. Superior and inferior rim displacements were also measured. A finite element (FE) model of one scapula was used to analyze the interfacial stresses at the implant/cement and cement/bone interfaces. All ten implants failed inferiorly at the implant-cement interface, two also failed at the cement-bone interface inferiorly, and three showed superior failure. Failure occurred at of 80,966 ± 53,729 (mean ± SD) cycles. CT scans confirmed failure of the fixation, and in most cases, was observed either before or with visual failure. Significant correlations were found between inferior rim displacement, vertical head displacement and failure of the glenoid implant. The FE model showed peak tensile stresses inferiorly and high compressive stresses superiorly, corroborating experimental findings. In vitro monitoring methods correlated to failure progression in clinical CT images possibly indicating its capacity to detect loosening earlier for earlier clinical intervention if needed. Its use in detecting failure non-destructively for implant development and testing is also valuable. The study highlights failure at the implant-cement interface and early signs of failure are identifiable in CT images. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research® Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 9999:XX-XX, 2018.

Journal article

Lord BR, Colaco HB, Gupte CM, Wilson AJ, Amis AAet al., 2018, ACL graft compression: a method to allow reduced tunnel sizes in ACL reconstruction, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, Vol: 26, Pages: 2430-2437, ISSN: 0942-2056

PURPOSE: A common problem during ACL reconstruction is asymmetry of proximal-distal graft diameter leading to tunnel upsizing and graft-tunnel mismatch. Compression downsizing provides a graft of uniform size, allowing easy passage into a smaller tunnel. The purpose of this study was to quantify the graft compression technique and its effects on graft biomechanics and stability. It was hypothesised that compression downsizing would significantly reduce cross-sectional area (CSA); that no significant changes in graft biomechanics would occur; graft fixation stability would be improved. METHOD: Sixty-eight non-irradiated peroneus longus (PL) tendons were investigated. Twenty were halved and paired into ten four-strand grafts, 20 strands were compressed by 0.5-1 mm diameter and changes in CSA recorded using an alginate mould technique. The following properties were compared with 20 control strands: cyclic strain when loaded 70-220 N for 1000 cycles; stiffness; ultimate tensile load and stress; Young's modulus. 24 PL tendons were quadrupled into grafts, 12 were compressed and all 24 were submerged in Ringer's solution at 37 °C and the CSA recorded over 12 h. Twelve compressed and 12 control quadrupled grafts were mounted in porcine femurs, placed in Ringer's solution for 12 h at 37 °C and graft displacement at the bone tunnel aperture recorded under cyclic loading. RESULTS: Mean decreases in CSA of 31% under a stress of 471 kPa and 21% under a stress of 447 kPa were observed for doubled and quadrupled grafts, respectively. Compressed grafts re-expanded by 19% over 12 h compared to 2% for controls. No significant differences were observed between compressed and control grafts in the biomechanical properties and graft stability; mean cyclic displacements were 0.3 mm for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: No detrimental biomechanical effects of graft compression on allograft PL tendons were observed. Following compression, t

Journal article

Heilpern G, Stephen J, Ball S, Amis A, Williams Aet al., 2018, It is safe and effective to use all inside meniscal repair devices for posteromedial meniscal 'ramp' lesions, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, Vol: 26, Pages: 2310-2316, ISSN: 0942-2056

PURPOSE: Recently, it has been recognized that meniscocapsular ('ramp') lesions of the posterior one-third of the medial meniscus frequently occur during injuries causing ACL rupture, and that these lesions are easily missed at arthroscopy. Furthermore, it is clear that these lesions are biomechanically significant, adding to the deficits caused by ACL rupture, and that their repair can reverse this. The efficacy of an all inside repair technique has been questioned by some authors and by those who advocate a suture shuttle technique via an accessory posteromedial portal. The use of Ultra FastFix and FastFix 360 meniscal repair devices to repair posteromedial meniscocapsular separations was investigated in terms of safe deployment and the effectiveness. Author: Affiliations: Journal instruction requires a country for affiliations; however, these are missing in affiliations [1, 2]. Please verify if the provided country is correct and amend if necessary. METHODS: Twenty cadaveric fresh frozen knees were used-ten in each of two groups. A ramp lesion was created using a Beaver knife. The lesion was then repaired with either 4 Ultra FastFix (Smith and Nephew) or 4 FastFix 360 (Smith and Nephew) meniscal repair devices. The knees were put through a standardized loading cycle consisting of 10 Lachman's tests and ten maximum loading manual anterior drawer tests at 90° of flexion. Each knee was then flexed and extended fully ten times. The specimens were sectioned just proximal to the menisci and each suture anchor identified and its position recorded and photographed. Author: Author details: Kindly check and confirm whether the corresponding author mail id is correctly identified and amend if necessary. RESULTS: In the Ultra FastFix group, a single anchor was found to be in an intra-articular position-a failure rate of 2.5%. In the FastFix 360 group, 5 anchors failed-a 12.5% failure rate. In all cases, the anchors were attached to their suture and so not truly loose wit

Journal article

Marsland D, Stephen JM, Calder T, Amis AA, Calder JDFet al., 2018, Strength of Interference Screw Fixation to Cuboid vs Pulvertaft Weave to Peroneus Brevis for Tibialis Posterior Tendon Transfer for Foot Drop., Foot and Ankle International, Vol: 39, Pages: 858-864, ISSN: 1071-1007

BACKGROUND: Tibialis posterior (TP) tendon transfer is an effective treatment for foot drop. Currently, standard practice is to immobilize the ankle in a cast for 6 weeks nonweightbearing, risking postoperative stiffness. To assess whether early active dorsiflexion and protected weightbearing could be safe, the current study assessed tendon displacement under cyclic loading and load to failure, comparing the Pulvertaft weave (PW) to interference screw fixation (ISF) in a cadaveric foot model. METHODS: Twenty-four cadaveric ankles had TP tendon transfer performed, 12 with the PW technique and 12 with ISF to the cuboid. The TP tendon was cycled 1000 times at 50 to 150 N and then loaded to failure in a materials testing machine. Tendon displacement at the insertion site was recorded every 100 cycles. An independent t test and 2-way analysis of variance were performed to compare techniques, with a significance level of P < .05. RESULTS: Mean tendon displacement was similar in the PW group (2.9 ± 2.5 mm [mean ± SD]) compared with the ISF group (2.4 ± 1.1 mm), P = .35. One specimen in the ISF group failed early by tendon pullout. None of the PW group failed early, although displacement of 8.9 mm was observed in 1 specimen. Mean load to failure was 419.1 ± 82.6 N in the PW group in comparison to 499.4 ± 109.6 N in the ISF group, P = .06. CONCLUSION: For TP tendon transfer, ISF and PW techniques were comparable, with no differences in tendon displacement after cyclical loading or load to failure. Greater variability was observed in the PW group, suggesting it may be a less reliable technique. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The results indicate that early active dorsiflexion and protected weightbearing may be safe for clinical evaluation, with potential benefits for the patient compared with cast immobilization.

Journal article

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