Imperial College London

ProfessorAnneDell

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences

Head of the Department of Life Sciences
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5219a.dell

 
 
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Assistant

 

Mrs Geetika Masters +44 (0)20 7594 7621

 
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Location

 

101BSir Ernst Chain BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Medical Glycobiology - LIFE96021

Aims

The aim of this course is to give undergraduate students in-depth knowledge of the field of glycobiology, with an emphasis in on biomedically related topics. The goal is to develop a molecular understanding of carbohydrate-receptor interactions in cell-cell, cell-matrix and cell-pathogen interactions. Students will also be introduced to therapeutic applications and techniques used for the characterisation of glycosylation.

Role

Lecturer

Topics in Biotechnology - LIFE95016

Aims

Topics in Biotechnology provides a theoretical and practical grounding in modern biotechnology. Biotechnology is introduced in a historical context, and by comparison with synthetic chemistry as the main ‘competing technology’. Although biotechnology is an applied discipline, it depends upon the underpinning sciences of biochemistry and molecular biology. This principle is apparent in the 'Exploiting Metabolism' lecture series, which through several examples links fundamental understanding of metabolic systems to their exploitation in applications. In biotechnology, the design and troubleshooting of studies and experiments is arguably more open-ended than in other biological sciences, and more similar to engineering, as biotechnology principally involves the development and optimisation of non-natural biological systems rather than elucidating the function of natural biological systems. The course introduces this style of research, and provides students with the opportunity to experience it first-hand through a mini-project including laboratory practicals and associated workshops.

Role

Lecturer

Enzymes and Metabolism - LIFE40003

Aims

This course, which runs throughout the second half of the first year, builds on the fundamental concepts covered in Biological Chemistry to give more detailed insights into the molecular processes occurring in living systems. We intend that by the end of the year students will have a good understanding of biochemical reactions and be able to recognise functionally significant parts of complex molecular machinery. They should have an appreciation of molecular recognition and some understanding of the exquisite degree of control over chemical reactivity that must be exercised in living systems.

Role

Lecturer