Imperial College London

ProfessorAndreasEisingerich

Business School

Professor of Marketing
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9763a.eisingerich

 
 
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Location

 

386DBusiness School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

157 results found

Anto A, Asif R, Basu A, Kanapathipillai D, Salam H, Selim R, Zaman J, Eisingerich Aet al., 2024, Exploring the facilitators and barriers to addressing social media’s impact on anxiety within primary care: a qualitative study, BJGP Open, ISSN: 2398-3795

Background: Several researchers and policymakers have acknowledged the alarming association between social media usage and anxiety symptoms in young adults. While primary care holds a crucial role in the improvement of health outcomes for those presenting with anxiety, there has been no research on GPs’ perceptions of the impact of social media on anxiety. Furthermore, there has been little discussion of social media as a risk factor in anxiety-related consultations. This study is the first to use empirical research to inform how primary care can adapt to address social media’s impact on anxiety within young adults.Aim: To identify the facilitators and barriers within primary care to addressing social media’s impact on anxiety among young adults.Design & setting: A qualitative study of general practitioners in the United Kingdom.Method: Following an exploratory pilot interview, semi-structured interviews with GPs (n=7) were transcribed and thematically analysed following an inductive approach.Results: Six facilitators were identified: a framework to facilitate discussion, open GP attitudes, GP training, alternative support, larger stakeholder influence, and young adult education of social media’s impact on anxiety. Three barriers were identified: a lack of GP awareness of social media’s impact on anxiety, cautious GP attitudes, and increased pressure on the health service.Conclusion: This qualitative study revealed a diversity of perceptions, and these novel findings are instructive in the adaptation of primary care services to meet the current mental health needs of young adults, as well as better assisting GPs in engaging in these conversations, especially within university practice.

Journal article

Eisingerich AB, MacInnis DJ, Park CW, 2023, Do CSR efforts that focus on helping the environment influence brand purchase more than other forms of CSR?, Journal of Business Research, Vol: 168, ISSN: 0148-2963

Much has been written about corporate social responsibility (CSR). However, different types of CSR efforts may differentially influence consumer responses. We posit that CSR efforts that emphasize helping the environment affirm the moral values of universalism and benevolence. We advance a novel theory and provide empirical evidence regarding the unique emotional and behavioral effects of environment-based CSR relative to other CSR efforts, such as employee/fair labor practices and philanthropy/cause CSR. Specifically, we theorize and find that environment-based CSR has a stronger impact on brand purchase than these other types of CSR efforts, given its strong influence on consumers’ feelings of elevation and brand-self connections. The current study holds important implications for CSR theory, managers, and future research.

Journal article

Kerschbaumer RH, Foscht T, Eisingerich A, 2023, Is ownership of brands passe? A new model of temporary usage for durable goods, Journal of Business Strategy, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0164-5382

PurposeThe trend toward subscription economy accelerated the rise of access-based consumption models for durable consumer goods, replacing individual ownership with subscription contracts. At the same time, disruptive platform businesses have arisen in several consumer markets, bypassing traditional value chains while growing through network effects. In a conceptual approach, the authors address the future market for durable consumer goods in light of developments toward access-based consumption, subscription models and platform business models.Design/methodology/approachIn a conceptual approach, the authors apply a scenario analysis following the Framework Foresight method and address trends, constants, plans and projections shaping the future market of subscriptions for durable goods. The authors create a baseline scenario and two alternative scenarios for the future of consumer durables and thereby discuss platform growth stages and implications for manufacturer brands.FindingsThe rising market power of platform companies leads to a baseline scenario where these platforms enter the market of subscriptions for durable goods. Alternative scenario 1 addresses the successful market entry of new platform businesses. In contrast, alternative scenario 2 describes the rise of manufacturer brand platforms.Originality/valueThis conceptual research enriches the discussion of access-based business models by creating scenarios depicting possible future developments. Moreover, it adds to the increasing focus on platform business models and thereby addresses the role of traditional manufacturer brands in markets for durable consumer goods subscriptions.

Journal article

Astvansh V, Duffek B, Eisingerich A, 2023, How can companies recover from liability-invoking failures? exploring the role of uncertainty avoidance in facilitating consumer compliance across national cultures, Journal of International Marketing, Vol: 31, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 1069-031X

A company often faces incidents in which its offerings cause bodily (e.g., product safety defects) or psychological (e.g., data breach) harm to its consumers. Such incidents may invoke product liability lawsuits against the company. The company may seek to recover from the liability-invoking failure by notifying the affected consumers, offering a remedy, and persuading them to comply with the company message. The authors theorize and experimentally demonstrate that, on average, a prevention-focused message receives greater compliance than a promotion-focused message. Further, a prevention-focused message is more effective with consumers from high uncertainty avoidance cultures, whereas a promotion-focused message is more effective in low uncertainty avoidance cultures. Perceived compatibility of prevention or promotion goals with low or high values of uncertainty avoidance mediates the interaction effect on compliance. The findings help companies overcome consumer apathy to product recall or data breach notices and offer managers ways to promote consumer safety and protection.

Journal article

Jun M, Han J, Zhou Z, Eisingerich Aet al., 2023, When is celebrity endorsement effective? Exploring the role of celebrity endorsers in enhancing key brand associations, Journal of Business Research, Vol: 164, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 0148-2963

This study examines how a celebrity endorser’s key associations can complement and help improve a brand’s low corresponding associations. By conducting three studies, we find that when consumers have no prior knowledge about the benefits of a brand, a celebrity’s enabling, enticing, and enriching (3E) associations get transferred to the brand. However, when consumers know that a brand has low 3E benefits, only the celebrity endorsers’ enriching associations are transferred to the brand. Thus, from the current study the importance of a celebrity’s enriching benefits is emphasized for both unknown and well-known brands. Furthermore, we theorize and demonstrate consumer elevation as the underlying mechanism whereby the enriching benefits of a celebrity endorser are transferred to a brand. The current findings extend the extant literature on celebrity endorsement management and provide valuable managerial insights for developing effective celebrity endorsement strategies.

Journal article

Liu Y, Heinberg M, Huang X, Eisingerich Aet al., 2023, Building a competitive advantage based on transparency: when and why does transparency matter for corporate social responsibility?, Business Horizons, Vol: 66, Pages: 517-527, ISSN: 0007-6813

Customers today are increasingly demanding transparency from firms. This article discusses the concept of performance transparency and explores when and why transparency plays a key role for a firm’s CSR effectiveness. In doing so, it addresses consumer skepticism as the logic of the transparency-CSR interaction and presents empirical evidence of the effect. It also discusses key principles for managing performance transparency effectively. Companies should monitor and track performance transparency regularly, initiate consistent transparency practices along with CSR activities, pay attention to the types of information made available, and adapt the transparency practices to the involvement level.

Journal article

Anto A, Asif RO, Basu A, Kanapathipillai D, Salam H, Selim R, Zaman J, Eisingerich Aet al., 2023, Exploring the impact of social media on anxiety among university students in the United Kingdom: qualitative study, JMIR Formative Research, Vol: 7, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 2561-326X

Background:The rapid surge in social media platforms has significant implications for users’ mental health, particularly anxiety. In the case of social media, the impact on mental well-being has been highlighted by multiple stakeholders as a cause for concern. However, there has been limited research into how the association between social media and anxiety arises, specifically among university students—the generation that has seen the introduction and evolution of social media, and currently lives through the medium. Extant systematic literature reviews within this area of research have not yet focused on university students or anxiety, rather predominantly investigating adolescents or generalized mental health symptoms and disorders. Furthermore, there is little to no qualitative data exploring the association between social media and anxiety among university students.Objective:The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic literature review of the existing literature and a qualitative study that aims to develop foundational knowledge around the association of social media and anxiety among university students and enhance extant knowledge and theory.Methods:A total of 29 semistructured interviews were conducted, comprising 19 male students (65.5%) and 10 female students (34.5%) with a mean age of 21.5 years. All students were undergraduates from 6 universities across the United Kingdom, with most students studying in London (89.7%). Participants were enrolled through a homogenous purposive sampling technique via social media channels, word of mouth, and university faculties. Recruitment was suspended at the point of data saturation. Participants were eligible for the study if they were university students in the United Kingdom and users of social media.Results:Thematic analysis resulted in 8 second-order themes: 3 mediating factors that decrease anxiety levels and 5 factors that increase anxiety levels. Social media decreased anxiety through posi

Journal article

Duffek B, Eisingerich AB, Merlo O, 2023, Why so toxic? A framework for exploring customer toxicity, Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) Review, Vol: 13, Pages: 122-143, ISSN: 1526-1794

Customers are increasingly empowered in their interactions with firms. Sometimes they help firms but, unfortunately, they can also become “toxic” and hurt them. Customers are toxic when they engage in deliberate and potentially harmful acts towards a firm driven either by a reparatory or damaging mental state following a transgression. Whilst the existing literature has studied customers’ negative actions against organizations, critical questions remain as to how and why customers become toxic. We structure a fragmented field of research on customer toxicity and explore customers’ mental state before they decide to do nothing (non-complainers), avoid the brand, act against firms with either a reparatory mental state—and, thus, often constructive in nature (e.g., to initiate change)—or with a toxic mental state and destructive objectives (e.g., to harm and punish a firm). We highlight that the impact of these actions on a firm can still be “toxic” even without intention of harming and punishing. Furthermore, we outline the conceptual domain of customer toxicity and shift the focus from negative behavior to customers’ mental state, by integrating the marketing, aggression, and psychology literatures. We discuss the theoretical implications of our study and explore how future work may further examine organizations’ interactions with toxic customers. Finally, we provide managerial recovery techniques depending on customers’ mental state at a particular time.

Journal article

Eisingerich A, Lin Y-T, Foscht T, 2023, A time for heroes? Conceptualization, development, and validation of the brand hero scale, European Journal of Marketing, Vol: 57, Pages: 1-26, ISSN: 0309-0566

PurposePrior work underscores the important role of customer advocacy for brands. The purpose of this study is to explore the critical role customers can play as brand heroes. The authors developed and validated a measurement scale composed of properties that are derived from distinct brand hero motivational mechanisms.Design/methodology/approachThe authors conducted one exploratory pilot, using semi-structured interviews, with industry and academic experts, and employed three main studies across varying brands and market settings.FindingsThis study explores and empirically demonstrates how the brand hero scale (BHS) is related to, yet distinct from, existing scales of opinion leaders, market mavens, attachment and customer advocacy. The six-item BHS demonstrates convergent, discriminant, nomological and predictive validity across several different brand contexts.Research limitations/implicationsThis research extends the extant body of work by identifying and defining brand heroes, developing and validating a parsimonious BHS, and demonstrating how its predictive validity extends both to a range of key advocacy and loyalty customer behaviors.Practical implicationsThe study provides provocative insights for marketing researchers and brand managers and ascertains the important role heroes may play for brands in terms of strong customer advocacy and loyalty behaviors.Originality/valueBuilding on the theory of meaning, this study shows that identifying and working with brand heroes is of great managerial importance and offers critical avenues for future research.

Journal article

Merlo O, Eisingerich AB, Hoyer WD, 2023, Immunizing customers against negative brand-related information, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Pages: 1-24, ISSN: 0092-0703

In today’s connected market, brands are more likely than ever to face negative press that can put their customers relationships to the test. Building and fortifying positive aspects of the brand-customer relationship (such as brand commitment, brand love and self-brand connections) may ward off some of the impact of negative information on customers, but this does not always provide full protection. Even customers who love a brand can turn against it when negative information enters the picture. Considering this, the current study provides an exploratory investigation into a new way to build up customer resilience that would otherwise not be formed simply by strengthening positive attributes of the customer-brand relationship. It argues that brands can strengthen their customers’ immunity to negative brand-related information by using an immunity metric (i.e., merely asking customers to reflect on their immunity makes them more resilient to actual negative information in the future). The construct of immunity has the dual benefit of being diagnostic of relationship strength, as well as acting as an immunizing agent. We test this effect and the process underlying it using three pilot studies, three multi-method studies, and interviews with customers and managers across different contexts. By doing so, the study establishes the theoretical and practical value of customer immunity to negative information and makes critical conceptual and pragmatic contributions to the existing body of customer research.

Journal article

Eisingerich A, MacInnis DJ, Park CW, 2023, A theoretical framework exploring three foundational benefits of brand attachment, A Research Agenda for Brand Management in a New Era of Consumerism, Editors: King, Murillo, Publisher: Edgar Elgar, Pages: 161-175

Book chapter

Kerschbaumer RH, Kreimer D, Foscht T, Eisingerich ABet al., 2023, Subscription commerce: an attachment theory perspective, INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF RETAIL DISTRIBUTION AND CONSUMER RESEARCH, Vol: 33, Pages: 92-115, ISSN: 0959-3969

Journal article

Webb J, Lin Y-T, Ang A, Michero D, Majeed A, Eisingerich A, Glasner Set al., 2023, Feasibility and preliminary outcomes of a mobile intervention combining cognitive behavioral therapy, virtual coaching, and nicotine replacement therapy for nicotine vaping cessation, Telemedicine Reports, Vol: 4, Pages: 48-52, ISSN: 2692-4366

BACKGROUND: Despite research demonstrating that those who use e-cigarettes, also known as vaping, express an interest in quitting, evidence-based vaping cessation interventions are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of an mHealth vaping cessation intervention. METHODS: Adults (N = 51) who were vaping nicotine were recruited online and enrolled in a 6-week mHealth intervention combining nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), self-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and coaching support through telephone and asynchronous messaging. Feasibility and self-reported 7- and 30-day abstinence were assessed at baseline and 1-month postquit date. RESULTS: The majority of participants completed treatment (45/51) and found the intervention helpful in supporting their vaping behavior change objectives. At 1-month postquit date, 48.9% (22/45) of study completers reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence and 28.8% (13/45) reported continuous 30-day abstinence. CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide preliminary support for an mHealth intervention approach to vaping cessation combining remote CBT-based coaching with NRT.

Journal article

Merlo O, Eisingerich AB, Gillingwater R, Cao JJet al., 2022, Exploring the changing role of brand archetypes in customer-brand relationships: Why try to be a hero when your brand can be more?, Business Horizons, ISSN: 0007-6813

For over two decades, managers have been encouraged to leverage archetypal meaning to strengthen their brands. Prior research has studied archetypes as universal patterns present in the collective unconscious that trigger an instinctive response in customers, and has argued that brands should evoke one archetype at a time. However, recent evidence seems to suggest that the single archetype view proposed in previous work may have lost its relevance in the marketplace. This study responds to calls for further research into brand archetypes by analyzing more than 2,400 brands and the archetypes they evoke in their marketing communications. The current findings provide support for the continuing relevance and importance of brand archetypes in marketing, showing that brands do connect with customers by evoking specific archetypes consistently. Critically, however, the study demonstrates that strong brands tend to leverage multiple archetypes at the same time, rather than just one. We explore key implications of our findings for theory and management. Avenues for future research and actionable guidelines for managers wishing to leverage archetypal meaning to build strong brands are discussed.

Journal article

Sun X, Rene K, Foscht T, Eisingerich Aet al., 2022, Pulling back the curtain: Company tours as a customer education tool and effects on pro-brand behaviors, Journal of Consumer Behaviour

Journal article

Sun X, Eisingerich A, Foscht T, Cui X, Schloffer Jet al., 2022, Why do customers want to learn? antecedents and outcomes of customer learning, European Journal of Marketing, Vol: 56, Pages: 677-703, ISSN: 0309-0566

Purpose – Customers often want to learn about a product/service, and companies can benefitfrom such a learning desire. While prior research has shed light on firm-beneficial outcomesof individual customer learning and explored the motivational factors of business partners’learning behavior, less is known about the critical antecedents of individual customers’learning behavior. This study explored the key drivers of customers’ learning desires in abusiness-to-consumer (B2C) context and identified customers with a stronger learning desire.Design/methodology/approach – This research employed both a lab experiment (Study 1, N= 148) and surveys (Study 2, N = 553; Study 3, N = 703) across different participantpopulations and product contexts.Findings – This study indicated that both involvement and knowledge-sharing intentiondrove customer learning desire. Customer expertise further strengthened these main effects.Moreover, a stronger learning desire led to greater customer satisfaction.Research limitations/implications – This study identified key factors involved in customerlearning desire and its potential benefits for companies. Additional research to investigatecustomer learning in specific environments and forms and regarding specific brands iswarranted.Practical implications – This study emphasizes the importance of supporting customerlearning and encourages businesses to manage customer learning proactively. It also providessuggestions for effective learning support for targeted customer groups.Originality/value – This study contributes to the customer learning literature by exploringkey influencing factors of individual customer learning desire, based on self-determinationtheory. It also identified the role of customer expertise in shaping customers’ learning 2processes. Moreover, this study examined customer learning as a novel way to enhancecustomer satisfaction.

Journal article

Eisingerich A, MacInnis DJ, Fleischmann M, 2022, Managing More Than Trust: Brand Love and Respect for a Brand, Harvard Business Review, ISSN: 0210-900X

Journal article

Sharif V, Eisingerich A, 2022, A road to preserving biodiversity: understanding psychological demand drivers of illegal wildlife products, Handbook on the Sustainability of Business

Journal article

Eisingerich A, MacInnis D, Fleischmann M, 2021, Moving beyond trust, MIT Sloan Management Review: MIT's journal of management research and ideas, ISSN: 0019-848X

Journal article

Sun X, Foscht T, Eisingerich AB, 2021, Does educating customers create positive word of mouth?, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Vol: 62, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0969-6989

This research theorizes and empirically examines whether and how educating customers—a brand's efforts to enhance customers' product-related knowledge—affects customer word of mouth (WOM). In two lab experiments across service and retailing contexts, we find that educating customers enhances customers' positive WOM for a brand. Customer satisfaction and perceived expertise mediate this effect. Critically, the positive impact on WOM is stronger for customers who have less prior knowledge regarding the educational topic and are more amenable to knowledge sharing. The current findings add to the literature on customer education and WOM and offer managerial insights for improving brands' WOM campaigns.

Journal article

Heinberg M, Liu Y, Huang X, Eisingerich ABet al., 2021, A Bad Job of Doing Good: Does Corporate Transparency on a Country and Company Level Moderate Corporate Social Responsibility Effectiveness?, JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MARKETING, Vol: 29, Pages: 45-61, ISSN: 1069-031X

Journal article

Lin Y-T, Doong H-S, Eisingerich A, 2021, Avatar design of virtual salespeople: mitigation of recommendation conflicts, Journal of Service Research, Vol: 24, Pages: 141-159, ISSN: 1094-6705

The role of virtual salesperson (VS) and the importance of customer reviews in facilitating online purchase decisions and sales have recently received much attention from technology companies, marketing practice professionals, and academics. However, customers’willingness to follow the purchase advice of the VS when there is a conflict between these recommendations and those of other online customer is less understood. Thisresearchtheorizes and investigates the extent to which customers’ relationship satisfaction with, and trust in,the VS helps explain customer willingness to follow VS advice in the context of recommendation conflict. Using four studies, our research explores how and when the VS’s avatar design mitigates the negative influence of conflict. An important theoretical and managerial implication of this research is that VS avatar designs that are high in automated social presence (ASP)help reduce the negative impact of conflict. However, we find that ASP mitigates the negative effects of conflict only for avatars that score low (versus high) on cuteness.

Journal article

Lin Y-T, MacInnis D, Eisingerich A, 2020, Strong anxiety boosts new product adoption when hope is also strong, Journal of Marketing, Vol: 84, Pages: 60-78, ISSN: 0022-2429

New products can evoke anticipatory emotions such as hope and anxiety. On the one hand, consumers might hope that innovative offerings will produce goal-congruent outcomes; on the other hand, they might also be anxious about possible outcomes that are goal-incongruent. The authors demonstrate the provocative and counterintuitive finding that strong anxiety about potentially goal-incongruent outcomes from a new product actually enhances (vs. weakens) consequential adoption intentions (Study 1) and actual adoption (Studies 2 and 3) when hope is also strong. The authors test action planning (a form of elaboration) and perceived control over outcomes as serial mediators to explain this effect. They find that the proposed mechanism holds even after they consider alternative explanations, including pain/gain inferences, confidence in achieving goal-congruent outcomes, global elaboration, affective forecasts, and motivated reasoning. Managerially, the findings suggest that when bringing a new product to market, new product adoption may be greatest when hope and anxiety are both strong. The findings also point to ways in which marketers might enhance hope and/or anxiety, and they suggest that the use of potentially anxiety-inducing tactics such as disclaimers in ads and on packages might not deter adoption when hope is also strong.

Journal article

Fritze M, Marchand A, Eisingerich A, Benkenstein Met al., 2020, Access-based services as substitutes for material possessions: the role of psychological ownership, Journal of Service Research, Vol: 23, Pages: 368-385, ISSN: 1094-6705

Access-based services—in which consumers do not physically own material goods but gainaccess to services by registering with the provider—have risenin popularityas an alternative to individual ownership and conventional consumption.Yet,companies still face key challenges in promoting theseservices. Prior research indicates that consumersassign significant importance to their material possessions; the current study investigates how psychological ownership, or the mental state of perceiving something as one’s own, attainedthrough access-based services might lead customers toincrease their service useand forgomaterial ownershipand consumption. With four studies,using cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental data, as well as combined self-reportswith usage data,we theorize and demonstrate this effect. Firms that offer access-based services can increase customers’ service psychologicalownership, which acts as a psychological substitute for physical ownership and increases access-based service use. The results suggest ways managers can leverage the psychological power of ownershipfeelings,rather than try to fight the lackof actual ownership,in access-based consumptioncontexts.

Journal article

Borah A, Banerjee S, Lin Y-T, Jain A, Eisingerich Aet al., 2020, Improvised marketing interventions in social media, Journal of Marketing, Vol: 84, Pages: 69-91, ISSN: 0022-2429

Online virality has attracted the attention of academics and marketers who seek to identify the characteristics of online content that promote sharing. This article adds to this body of research by examining the phenomenon of improvised marketing interventions (IMIs)—social media actions that are composed and executed in real-time proximal to an external event. Using the concept of quick wit and theorizing that the effect of IMIs is furthered by humor and timeliness or unanticipation, the authors find evidence of this effect on both virality and firm value across five multi-method studies, including quasi-experiments, experiments, and archival data analysis. These findings point to the potential of improvised marketing actions in social media and to the features that firms should proactively focus on managing in order to reap the observed online sharing and firm value benefits.

Journal article

Liu Y, Hultman M, Eisingerich AB, Wei Xet al., 2020, How does brand loyalty interact with tourism destination? Exploring the effect of brand loyalty on place attachment, ANNALS OF TOURISM RESEARCH, Vol: 81, ISSN: 0160-7383

Journal article

Ren J, Tsai H, Eisingerich A, 2020, The effect of Inter- and Intra- regional geographic diversification strategies on firm performance in China, Management Decision, Vol: 58, Pages: 16-38, ISSN: 0025-1747

PurposeThis study theorizes and empirically examines the effects of intra- and inter-regional geographic diversification on firm performance in China. Furthermore, it investigates the key firm capabilities, which moderate the relationships between intra- and inter-regional geographic diversification and firm performance.Design/methodology/approach In this research, we studied 366 listed companies that invest in mainland China. We used the Taiwan Economy Journal database to construct a panel dataset from 2005 to 2014 and employed panel regression estimations as part of our empirical analyses.Findings We find that the effect of regional diversification on firm performance is significantly influenced by the contexts of the expansion. More specifically, the results show that the effect of intra-regional geographic diversification on firm performance takes the form of a U-shape relationship. In contrast, we find that inter-regional geographic diversification has a negative effect on firm performance. Firm marketing, R&D, and managerial capabilities moderate these relationships.Research limitations/implications First, the companies studied in this research are mainly Taiwanese manufacturers with investments in mainland China. Second, the current model can be expanded by exploring additional process explanations and moderators in future research. Practical implicationsAn important practical implication of this research is that when firms choose an intra-regional expansion strategy in China, they should adopt a moderate provincial diversification strategy in the invested region and reinforce its marketing capability to enhance firm performance. A careful consideration of a firm’s marketing, R&D and managerial capabilities is needed for successful regional diversification strategies in the China market.Originality/valueThe findings of this study contribute significantly to the existing literature on firms’ regional diversification. First, we explore and e

Journal article

Ang D, Liu Y, Eisingerich AB, 2019, Difference in new product adoption among at-risk members of society: A critical analysis of males, females, and transgender individuals, Personality and Individual Differences, Vol: 151, ISSN: 0191-8869

The study examines how fear and embarrassment associated with the usage of a new product influence product adoption. The extant body of work on individual differences is largely based on educated, relatively wealthy individuals in industrialized countries. This study extended prior work by exploring the uptake of a new product among 1823 at-risk individuals including sex workers and drug users from countries with high HIV prevalence. The findings show that fear of contracting HIV encouraged new product adoption while embarrassment associated with taking the new product hindered it. It is noteworthy that embarrassment is a better predictor than fear. Critically, the effect of embarrassment differed across genders. Specifically, embarrassment plays a more important role for transgender and female individuals compared to males. The effects are driven by public and private embarrassment in sub-Saharan and non-sub-Saharan countries, respectively. This study thus contributes to the important work on sexuality, gender differences, fear, embarrassment, and the uptake of new products for high-risk or stigmatized members of marginalized communities. The findings also offer practical implications for communication strategies to facilitate the uptake of new products such as a new medicine among members of stigmatized communities, less wealthy, and less educated members of society.

Journal article

Fritze M, Eisingerich AB, Benkenstein M, 2019, Digital transformation and possession attachment: examining the endowment effect for consumers' relationships with hedonic and utilitarian digital service technologies, Electronic Commerce Research, Vol: 19, Pages: 311-337, ISSN: 1389-5753

A significant body of research has examined the importance of material possession attachment and its influence on consumer behavior. Critical questions, however, remain with regard to the extent to which, and if at all, consumers form instantaneous possession attachment in electronic commerce. In this research, we conducted one quasi-experimental field study and one scenario-based online experiment to examine the endowment effect (EE) for digital services. The current findings demonstrate that consumers become instantaneously attached to and are reluctant to give up digital services once they have obtained them. Two main explanations of the EE in electronic commerce are investigated. Critically, the results show that the psychological processes underlying the effect differ between utilitarian and hedonic digital services. Proprietary feelings towards utilitarian digital services occur due to loss aversion, whereas proprietary feelings towards hedonic digital services reflect the consumer’s conscious self-relatedness to the digital service.

Journal article

Eisingerich A, Marchand A, Fritze M, Dong Let al., 2019, Hook vs. hope: how to enhance customer engagement through gamification, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol: 36, Pages: 200-215, ISSN: 0167-8116

Many digital service providers have adopted gamification to promote customer engagement. Critical questions, however, remain about the most effective way to enhance customer engagement and increase sales by applying gamification. With a research design that combines qualitative and quantitative methods, including the use of objective sales data from a large field study and replication of the findings across different contexts, this study explores how gamification fosters customer engagement. Both field study results and a simulation study reveal gamification principles (i.e., social interaction, sense of control, goals, progress tracking, rewards, and prompts) that promote hope and consequently increase customer engagement and digital sales. Furthermore, we find that hope is more strongly associated with customer engagement than the psychological condition of compulsion, which even exerts a negative impact. This research thus explores how gamification creates value for customers and provides actionable insights for managers to foster hope through gamification as opposed to get customers hooked.

Journal article

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