Imperial College London

DrAndrewInnes

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Immunology and Inflammation

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 4017a.innes

 
 
//

Location

 

Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

52 results found

Innes AJ, Mullish BH, Ghani R, Szydlo RM, Apperley JF, Olavarria E, Palanicawandar R, Kanfer EJ, Milojkovic D, McDonald JAK, Brannigan ET, Thursz MR, Williams HRT, Davies FJ, Marchesi JR, Pavlu Jet al., 2021, Fecal microbiota transplant mitigates adverse outcomes in patients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, ISSN: 2235-2988

The gut microbiome can be adversely affected by chemotherapy and antibiotics prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).This affects graft success and increases susceptibility to multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) colonization and infection. Weperformed an initial retrospective analysis of our use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy donors as therapy forMDRO-colonized patients with hematological malignancy. FMT was performed on eight MDRO-colonized patients pre-HCT (FMT-MDROgroup), and outcomes compared with 11 MDRO colonized HCT patients from the same period. At 12 months, survival wassignificantly higher in the FMT-MDRO group (70% versus 36% p = 0.044). Post-HCT, fewer FMT-MDRO patients required intensivecare (0% versus 46%, P = 0.045) or experienced fever (0.29 versus 0.11 days, P = 0.027). Intestinal MDRO decolonization occurred in25% of FMT-MDRO patients versus 11% non-FMT MDRO patients. Despite the significant difference and statistically comparablepatient/transplant characteristics, as the sample size was small, a matched-pair analysis to non-MDRO colonized control cohorts(2:1 matching) was performed. At 12 months, the MDRO group who did not have an FMT had significantly lower survival (36.4%versus 61.9% respectively, p=0.012), and higher non relapse mortality (NRM; 60.2% versus 16.7% respectively, p=0.009) than theirpaired non-colonized cohort. There was no difference in survival (70% versus 43.4%, p=0.14) or NRM (12.5% versus 31.2%respectively, p=0.24) between the FMT-MDRO group and their paired cohort. Negative outcomes, including mortality associatedwith MDRO colonization, may be ameliorated by pre-HCT FMT, despite lack of intestinal decolonization. Further work is needed toexplore the observed benefit.

Journal article

Mullish BH, Innes AJ, Ghani R, Szydlo R, Williams HR, Thursz MR, Marchesi J, Davies F, Pavlu Jet al., 2021, FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANT PRIOR TO ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANT IN PATIENTS COLONIZED WITH MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT ORGANISMS IS ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVED SURVIVAL, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S168-S169, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Ghani R, Mullish BH, McDonald JAK, Ghazy A, Williams HRT, Brannigan ET, Mookerjee S, Satta G, Gilchrist M, Duncan N, Corbett R, Innes AJ, Pavlu J, Thursz MR, Davies F, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, Disease prevention not decolonization – a model for fecal microbiota transplantation in patients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol: 72, Pages: 1444-1447, ISSN: 1058-4838

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) yields variable intestinal decolonization results for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). This study showed significant reductions in antibiotic duration, bacteremia and length of stay in 20 patients colonized/ infected with MDRO receiving FMT (compared to pre-FMT history, and a matched group not receiving FMT), despite modest decolonization rates.

Journal article

Vergis N, Phillips R, Cornelius V, Katsarou A, Youngstein T, Cook L, Willicombe M, Pilay C, Shturova T, Almonte M, Charania A, Turner R, Kon OM, Cooke G, Thursz M, Cherlin S, Wason J, Milojkovic D, Innes AJ, Cooper Net al., 2021, Multi-arm Trial of Inflammatory Signal Inhibitors (MATIS) for hospitalised patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 pneumonia: a structured summary of a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, Trials, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1745-6215

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of MATIS is to determine the efficacy of ruxolitinib (RUX) or fostamatinib (FOS) compared to standard of care (SOC) with respect to reducing the proportion of hospitalised patients progressing from mild or moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Secondary objectives, at 14 and 28 days, are to: Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce mortality Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for invasive ventilation or ECMO Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for non-invasive ventilation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the proportion of participants suffering significant oxygen desaturation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for renal replacement therapy Determine the efficacy of RUX and FOS to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism Determine the efficacy of RUX and FOS to reduce the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia [graded by a 9-point modified WHO Ordinal Scale* Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce systemic inflammation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to the incidence of renal impairment Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce duration of hospital stay Evaluate the safety of RUX and FOS for treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia. TRIAL DESIGN: A multi-arm, multi-stage (3-arm parallel-group, 2-stage) randomised controlled trial that allocates participants 1:1:1 and tests for superiority in experimental arms versus standard of care. PARTICIPANTS: Patients will be recruited while inpatients during hospitalisation for COVID-19 in multiple centres throughout the UK including Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. INCLUSION: Patients age ≥ 18 years at screening Patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 pneumonia, defined as Grade 3 or 4 severity by the WHO COVID-19 Ordinal Scale Patients meeting criteria: Hospitalization AND SARS-CoV2 infection (clinically suspected or laboratory confirmed) AND Radiological change consistent with COVID-19 disease C

Journal article

Maynard S, Ros-Soto J, Chaidos A, Innes A, Paleja K, Mirvis E, Buti N, Sharp H, Palanicawandar R, Milojkovic Det al., 2021, The role of ibrutinib in COVID-19 hyperinflammation: a case report, International Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol: 105, Pages: 274-276, ISSN: 1201-9712

Continuing ibrutinib in patients with COVID-19 may be advantageous given its immunomodulatory properties and withdrawal of ibrutinib therapy may be detrimental. Further evidence is required to explore the potential therapeutic impact of BTKis and other immunomodulatory agents on the clinical course of COVID-19 as is currently being carried out in a number of clinical trials.

Journal article

Ghani R, Mullish B, Innes A, Szydlo RM, Apperley JF, Olavarria E, Palanicawandar R, Kanfer E, Milojkovic D, McDonald JAK, Brannigan E, Thursz MR, Williams HRT, Davies FJ, Pavlu J, Marchesi Jet al., 2021, Faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) prior to allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients colonised with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) results in improved survival, ECCMID

Conference paper

Innes A, Sun B, Wagner V, Brookes S, McHugh D, Pombo J, Porreca RM, Dharmalingam G, Vernia S, Zuber J, Vannier J-B, García-Escudero R, Gil Jet al., 2021, XPO7 is a tumor suppressor regulating p21CIP1-dependent senescence, Genes and Development, Vol: 35, Pages: 379-391, ISSN: 0890-9369

Senescence is a key barrier to neoplastic transformation. To identify senescence regulators relevant to cancer, we screened a genome-wide shRNA library. Here, we describe exportin 7 (XPO7) as a novel regulator of senescence and validate its function in telomere-induced, replicative and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). XPO7 is a bidirectional transporter that regulates the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of a broad range of substrates. Depletion of XPO7 results in reduced levels of TCF3 and an impaired induction of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21CIP1 during OIS. Deletion of XPO7 correlates with poorer overall survival in several cancer types. Moreover, depletion of XPO7 alleviated OIS and increased tumor formation in a mouse model of liver cancer. Our results suggest that XPO7 is a novel tumor suppressor that regulates p21CIP1 expression to control senescence and tumorigenesis.

Journal article

Salisbury RA, Curto-Garcia N, OSullivan J, Chen F, Polzella P, Godfrey AL, Russell J, Knapper S, Willan J, Frewin R, Joshi S, Arami S, Burns S, Teh CH, Wadelin F, Dhanapal J, Neelakantan P, Milojkovic D, Psaila B, Szydlo R, Francis S, Cargo C, Jain M, McGregor A, Wallis L, Duncombe A, Hussein H, Dyer P, Munro L, Bond L, McMullin MF, Somervaille TCP, Garg M, Sekhar M, Harrison C, Mead AJ, Innes AJet al., 2021, Results of a national UK physician reported survey of COVID-19 infection in patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, Leukemia, Vol: 35, Pages: 2424-2430, ISSN: 0887-6924

Journal article

Claudiani S, Apperley JF, Szydlo R, Khan A, Nesr G, Hayden C, J Innes A, Dominy K, Foskett P, Foroni L, Khorashad J, Milojkovic Det al., 2020, TKI dose reduction can effectively maintain major molecular remission in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Vol: 193, Pages: 346-355, ISSN: 0007-1048

Journal article

Innes AJ, Ghani R, Mullish BH, Szydlo R, Palanicawandar R, Olavarria E, Apperley JF, Thursz MR, Williams HR, Marchesi JR, Davies F, Pavlu Jet al., 2020, O105. Faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) can reduce the high NRM associated with multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO) colonisation prior to allogeneic HCT., The 46th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Publisher: Springer Nature [academic journals on nature.com], Pages: 122-122, ISSN: 0268-3369

Conference paper

Ellington MJ, Davies F, Jauneikaite E, Hopkins KL, Turton JF, Adams G, Pavlu J, Innes AJ, Eades C, Brannigan ET, Findlay J, White L, Bolt F, Kadhani T, Chow Y, Patel B, Mookerjee S, Otter JA, Sriskandan S, Woodford N, Holmes Aet al., 2020, A multi-species cluster of GES-5 carbapenemase producing Enterobacterales linked by a geographically disseminated plasmid, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol: 71, Pages: 2553-2560, ISSN: 1058-4838

BACKGROUND: Early and accurate treatment of infections due to carbapenem-resistant organisms is facilitated by rapid diagnostics but rare resistance mechanisms can compromise detection. One year after a GES-5 carbapenemase-positive Klebsiella oxytoca infection was identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS) (later found to be part of a cluster of three cases), a cluster of 11 patients with GES-5-positive K. oxytoca was identified over 18 weeks in the same hospital.METHODS: Bacteria were identified by MALDI-TOF, antimicrobial susceptibility testing followed EUCAST guidelines. Ertapenem-resistant isolates were referred to Public Health England for characterization using PCR detection of GES, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and WGS for the second cluster.RESULTS: The identification of the first GES-5 K. oxytoca isolate was delayed, being identified on WGS. A GES-gene PCR informed the occurrence of the second cluster in real-time. In contrast to PFGE, WGS phylogenetic analysis refuted an epidemiological link between the two clusters; it also suggested a cascade of patient-to-patient transmission in the later cluster. A novel GES-5-encoding plasmid was present in K. oxytoca,E. coli and E. cloacae isolates from unlinked patients within the same hospital group and in human and wastewater isolates from three hospitals elsewhere in the UK.CONCLUSIONS: Genomic sequencing revolutionized the epidemiological understanding of the clusters, it also underlined the risk of covert plasmid propagation in healthcare settings and revealed the national distribution of the resistance-encoding plasmid. Sequencing results also informed and led to the ongoing use of enhanced diagnostic tests for detecting carbapenemases locally and nationally.

Journal article

Claudiani S, Rosadas C, McClure M, Khan M, Tedder RS, Innes AJ, Milojkovic D, Apperley Jet al., 2020, Prevalence of Sars-Cov-2 Infection in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Publisher: AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY, ISSN: 0006-4971

Conference paper

Innes AJ, Cook LB, Marks S, Bataillard E, Crossette-Thambiah C, Sivasubramaniam G, Apperley J, Milojkovic Det al., 2020, Ruxolitinib for tocilizumab-refractory severe COVID-19 infection., British Journal of Haematology, Vol: 190, Pages: e198-e200, ISSN: 0007-1048

Whilst the majority of patients with COVID-19 infection have mild self-limiting symptoms, for some the SARS-CoV2 virus can trigger a severe hyperinflammatory syndrome which is life threatening. Anti-IL6 therapy has shown promise in restraining the hyperinflammatory syndrome and while IL-6 is a pleiotropic mediatory of the inflammatory response, redundancy within inflammatory pathways means that the use of such targeted monoclonal therapy may have too restricted a repertoire in some patients. We present the case of a 53-year-old haematopoetic stem cell transplant recipient who developed a severe COVID-19 that was refractory to anti-IL6 therapy, but responded to Jak-Stat inhibition with ruxolitinib, demonstrating its safety and efficacy in this setting.

Journal article

Nesr G, Laffan M, Claudiani S, Innes A, Apperley J, Milojkovic Det al., 2020, Platelet function in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with asciminib, Leukemia & Lymphoma, Vol: 61, Pages: 3021-3023, ISSN: 1042-8194

Journal article

Gupta RK, Peppa D, Hill AL, Galvez C, Salgado M, Pace M, McCoy LE, Griffith SA, Thornhill J, Alrubayyi A, Huyveneers LEP, Nastouli E, Grant P, Edwards SG, Innes AJ, Frater J, Nijhuis M, Wensing AMJ, Martinez-Picado J, Olavarria Eet al., 2020, Evidence for HIV-1 cure after CCR5 Delta 32/Delta 32 allogeneic haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation 30 months post analytical treatment interruption: a case report, LANCET HIV, Vol: 7, Pages: E340-E347, ISSN: 2352-3018

Journal article

Ghani R, Mullish BH, McDonald JA, Ghazy A, Williams HR, Brannigan E, Satta G, Gilchrist M, Duncan N, Corbett R, Pavlu J, Innes AJ, Thursz MR, Davies F, Marchesi Jet al., 2020, 1144 FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANT FOR MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT ORGANISMS: IMPROVED CLINICAL OUTCOMES BEYOND INTESTINAL DECOLONISATION, Publisher: Elsevier BV, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Ghani R, Mullish BH, McDonald J, Ghazy A, Williams H, Satta G, Eimear B, Gilchrist M, Duncan N, Corbett R, Pavlu J, Innes A, Thursz M, Marchesi J, Davies Fet al., 2020, Disease prevention not decolonisation: a cohort study for faecal microbiota transplantation for patients colonised with multidrug-resistant organisms, ECCMID 2020

Conference paper

Guerrero A, Herranz N, Sun B, Wagner V, Gallage S, Guiho R, Wolter K, Pombo J, Irvine EE, Innes AJ, Birch J, Glegola J, Manshaei S, Heide D, Dharmalingam G, Harbig J, Olona A, Behmoaras J, Dauch D, Uren AG, Zender L, Vernia S, Martínez-Barbera JP, Heikenwalder M, Withers DJ, Gil Jet al., 2019, Cardiac glycosides are broad-spectrum senolytics, Nature Metabolism, Vol: 1, Pages: 1074-1088, ISSN: 2522-5812

Senescence is a cellular stress response that results in the stable arrest of old, damaged or pre-neoplastic cells. Oncogene-induced senescence is tumour suppressive but can also exacerbate tumorigenesis through the secretion of proinflammatory factors from senescent cells. Drugs that selectively kill senescent cells, termed ‘senolytics’, have proved beneficial in animal models of many age-associated diseases. In the present study, we show that the cardiac glycoside ouabain is a senolytic agent with broad activity. Senescent cells are sensitized to ouabain-induced apoptosis, a process mediated in part by induction of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein NOXA. We demonstrate that cardiac glycosides synergize with anti-cancer drugs to kill tumour cells and eliminate senescent cells that accumulate after irradiation or in old mice. Ouabain also eliminates senescent pre-neoplastic cells. The findings of the present study suggest that cardiac glycosides may be effective anti-cancer drugs by acting through multiple mechanisms. Given the broad range of senescent cells targeted by cardiac glycosides, their use against age-related diseases warrants further exploration.

Journal article

Cuartero S, Innes AJ, Merkenschlager M, 2019, Towards a better understanding of cohesin mutations in AML, Frontiers in Oncology, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2234-943X

Classical driver mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) typically affect regulatorsof cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The selective advantage of increasedproliferation, improved survival, and reduced differentiation on leukemia progression isimmediately obvious. Recent large-scale sequencing efforts have uncovered numerousnovel AML-associated mutations. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the mostfrequently mutated genes encode general regulators of transcription and chromatinstate. Understanding the selective advantage conferred by these mutations remains amajor challenge. A striking example are mutations in genes of the cohesin complex,a major regulator of three-dimensional genome organization. Several landmark studieshave shown that cohesin mutations perturb the balance between self-renewal anddifferentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Emerging data nowbegin to uncover the molecular mechanisms that underpin this phenotype. Amongthese mechanisms is a role for cohesin in the control of inflammatory responses inHSPCs and myeloid cells. Inflammatory signals limit HSPC self-renewal and driveHSPC differentiation. Consistent with this, cohesin mutations promote resistance toinflammatory signals, and may provide a selective advantage for AML progression.In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding cohesin mutations inAML, and speculate whether vulnerabilities associated with these mutations could beexploited therapeutically

Journal article

Innes A, Wooley P, Szydlo R, Lozano S, Fernando F, Bansal D, Palanicawandar R, Milojkovic D, May P, Nadal-Melsio E, Yebra-Fernandez E, Olavarria E, Apperley J, Pavlu Jet al., 2019, Complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi) prior to allogeneic HCT for acute myeloid leukaemia is associated with a high non-relapse mortality., Leukemia, Vol: 34, Pages: 667-670, ISSN: 1476-5551

Journal article

Beckerson J, Szydlo RM, Hickson M, Mactier CE, Innes AJ, Gabriel IH, Palanicawandar R, Kanfer EJ, Macdonald DH, Milojkovic D, Rahemtulla A, Chaidos A, Karadimitris A, Olavarria E, Apperley JF, Pavlu Jet al., 2019, Impact of route and adequacy of nutritional intake on outcomes of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation for haematologic malignancies, Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 38, Pages: 738-744, ISSN: 0261-5614

BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is often associated with poor oral intake due to painful mucositis and gastrointestinal sequalae that occur following a preparative regimen of intensive chemotherapy and/or total body radiation. Although attractive to assume that optimal nutrition improves HCT outcomes, there are limited data to support this. It is also unclear whether artificial nutrition support should be provided as enteral tube feeding or parenteral nutrition (PN). METHODS: We analysed day-100 non-relapse mortality (NRM), incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), acute gastrointestinal GvHD, 5-year survival and GvHD-free/relapse-free survival (GRFS) according to both route and adequacy of nutritional intake prior to neutrophil engraftment, together with other known prognostic factors, in a retrospective cohort of 484 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT for haematologic malignancy between 2000 and 2014. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses showed increased NRM with inadequate nutrition (hazard ratio (HR) 4.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-7.2) and adequate PN (HR 2.9; 95% CI 1.6-5.4) compared to adequate enteral nutrition (EN) both P < .001. There were increased incidences of gastrointestinal GvHD of any stage and all GvHD ≥ grade 2 in patients who received PN (odds ratio (OR) 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.3; P = .006, and OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1-3.0; P = .018, respectively), compared to adequate EN. Patients who received adequate PN and inadequate nutrition also had reduced probabilities of survival and GRFS at 5 years. CONCLUSION: Adequate EN during the early transplantation course is associated with reduced NRM, improved survival and GRFS at 5 years. Furthermore, adequate EN is associated with lower incidence of overall and gut acute GvHD than PN, perhaps because of its ability to maintain mucosal integrity, modulate the immune response to intensive chemo/radiotherapy and support the gastroi

Journal article

Gupta RK, Abdul-Jawad S, McCoy LE, Mok HP, Peppa D, Salgado M, Martinez-Picado J, Nijhuis M, Wensing AMJ, Lee H, Grant P, Nastouli E, Lambert J, Pace M, Salasc F, Monit C, Innes AJ, Muir L, Waters L, Frater J, Lever AML, Edwards SG, Gabriel IH, Olavarria Eet al., 2019, HIV-1 remission following CCR5Δ32/Δ32 haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, Nature, Vol: 568, Pages: 244-248, ISSN: 0028-0836

A cure for HIV-1 remains unattainable as only one case has been reported, a decade ago1,2. The individual-who is known as the 'Berlin patient'-underwent two allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) procedures using a donor with a homozygous mutation in the HIV coreceptor CCR5 (CCR5Δ32/Δ32) to treat his acute myeloid leukaemia. Total body irradiation was given with each HSCT. Notably, it is unclear which treatment or patient parameters contributed to this case of long-term HIV remission. Here we show that HIV-1 remission may be possible with a less aggressive and toxic approach. An adult infected with HIV-1 underwent allogeneic HSCT for Hodgkin's lymphoma using cells from a CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donor. He experienced mild gut graft-versus-host disease. Antiretroviral therapy was interrupted 16 months after transplantation. HIV-1 remission has been maintained over a further 18 months. Plasma HIV-1 RNA has been undetectable at less than one copy per millilitre along with undetectable HIV-1 DNA in peripheral CD4 T lymphocytes. Quantitative viral outgrowth assays from peripheral CD4 T lymphocytes show no reactivatable virus using a total of 24 million resting CD4 T cells. CCR5-tropic, but not CXCR4-tropic, viruses were identified in HIV-1 DNA from CD4 T cells of the patient before the transplant. CD4 T cells isolated from peripheral blood after transplantation did not express CCR5 and were susceptible only to CXCR4-tropic virus ex vivo. HIV-1 Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses were lost after transplantation, whereas cytomegalovirus-specific responses were detectable. Similarly, HIV-1-specific antibodies and avidities fell to levels comparable to those in the Berlin patient following transplantation. Although at 18 months after the interruption of treatment it is premature to conclude that this patient has been cured, these data suggest that a single allogeneic HSCT with homozygous CCR5Δ32 donor cells may b

Journal article

Innes AJ, Gil J, 2019, IMR90 ER:RAS: A cell model of oncogene-induced senescence, Methods in Molecular Biology, Vol: 1896, Pages: 83-92, ISSN: 1940-6029

Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a cellular response that limits the replication of cells expressing oncogenes. As a result, OIS is a potent tumor suppressor mechanism limiting cancer progression. Here we describe IMR90 ER:RAS, a widely used model to study OIS in cell culture. This model takes advantage of IMR90 human primary fibroblast infected with a 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT) inducible ER:RAS construct. RAS activation upon 4-OHT treatment results in a coordinated induction of senescence, recapitulating different aspects of the phenotype such as the growth arrest and the establishment of a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP).

Journal article

Innes AJ, Woolley P, Szydlo R, Lozano S, Fernando F, Bansal D, Palanicawandar R, Nadal-Melsio E, Yebra-Fernandez E, Apperley J, Olavarria E, Pavlu Jet al., 2018, Complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi) prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a high non-relapse mortality without increased relapse risk, 60th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Hematology (ASH), Publisher: American Society of Hematology, ISSN: 1528-0020

Conference paper

González-Meljem JM, Hasting S, Gallage S, Innes Aet al., 2018, Biomedical research in aging., Aging Research - Methodological Issues, Editors: García-Peña, Gutiérrez-Robledo, Pérez-Zepeda, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 25-54, ISBN: 9783319953861

Biomedical research has been instrumental in identifying key molecular and cellular changes that occur throughout the aging process, also known as the Hallmarks of Aging. Notably, these are shared between humans and several other species that have served as models for the study of aging in the laboratory. In this chapter, we discuss current knowledge regarding the significance of hallmarks such as: decay of stem cell function, acquisition of genomic instability, DNA damage, telomere attrition, deregulated nutrient sensing, chronic inflammation and cellular senescence. We further describe current methodological issues, experimental techniques and best practices for the study of each hallmark across different in vivo and in vitro systems, while also pointing at their limitations. Finally, we provide future perspectives for the improvement of experimental designs in biomedical research of aging.

Book chapter

Innes AJ, Matthey F, 2017, Red cell fragments can mask severe thrombocytopenia, BLOOD, Vol: 130, Pages: 1484-1484, ISSN: 0006-4971

Journal article

Innes AJ, Mullish BH, Fernando F, Adams G, Marchesi JR, Apperley JF, Brannigan E, Davies F, Pavlů Jet al., 2017, Faecal microbiota transplant: a novel biological approach to extensively drug-resistant organism-related non-relapse mortality., Bone Marrow Transplantation, Vol: 52, Pages: 1452-1454, ISSN: 1476-5365

Journal article

Innes AJ, Lee M, Francis N, Olavarria Eet al., 2017, Immunosuppression-associated Kaposi sarcoma following stem cell transplantation, BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Vol: 178, Pages: 9-9, ISSN: 0007-1048

Journal article

Khoder A, Sever M, Palanicawandar R, Pello O, Loaiza S, Bray E, Bradshaw A, Uddin S, Atta M, Selvaratnam V, Sevillano B, Monsalvo S, Altaf S, Innes A, Lozano S, Pavlu J, Auner H, Apperley J, Olavarria E, Kanfer Eet al., 2017, PLERIXAFOR EFFECTIVELY RESCUES BIOSIMILAR G-CSFALONE-BASED STEM CELL MOBILISATION FAILURES, Publisher: ELSEVIER SCI LTD, Pages: S55-S55, ISSN: 1465-3249

Conference paper

Chapman MS, Innes A, Milojkovic, Hing S, Claudiani S, Palanicawandar R, Apperley J, Khorashad Jet al., 2017, A retrospective analysis of patients testing positive for the JAK2 V617F mutation: correlation between mutant allele burden and disease phenotype, 57th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Society for Haematology, ISSN: 0007-1048

Conference paper

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00578710&limit=30&person=true