Imperial College London

Dr Ajay K Gupta

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3437a.k.gupta Website

 
 
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Location

 

ICCH59/61 North Wharf RoadSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

119 results found

Magavern EF, Kapil V, Saxena M, Gupta A, Caulfield MJet al., 2024, Use of Genomics to Develop Novel Therapeutics and Personalize Hypertension Therapy, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, ISSN: 1079-5642

<jats:p>Hypertension is a prevalent public health problem, contributing to &gt;10 million deaths annually. Though multiple therapeutics exist, many patients suffer from treatment-resistant hypertension or try several medications before achieving blood pressure control. Genomic advances offer mechanistic understanding of blood pressure variability, therapeutic targets, therapeutic response, and promise a stratified approach to treatment of primary hypertension. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate augmentation, aldosterone synthase inhibitors, and angiotensinogen blockade with silencing RNA and antisense therapies are among the promising novel approaches. Pharmacogenomic studies have also been done to explore the genetic bases underpinning interindividual variability in response to existing therapeutics. A polygenic approach using risk scores is likely to be the next frontier in stratifying responses to existing therapeutics.</jats:p>

Journal article

Gupta A, Whiteley WN, Godec T, Rostamian S, Ariti C, Mackay J, Whitehouse A, Janani L, Poulter NR, Sever PS, ASCOT-10 Investigatorset al., 2024, Legacy benefits of blood pressure treatment on cardiovascular events are primarily mediated by improved blood pressure variability: the ASCOT trial, European Heart Journal, ISSN: 0195-668X

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure variability (BPV) is an important predictor of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. The long-term effect of a period of blood pressure (BP) control, but with differential BPV, is uncertain. Morbidity and mortality follow-up of UK participants in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Blood Pressure-Lowering Arm has been extended for up to 21 years to determine the CV impact of mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) control and BPV during the trial, and amongst those allocated to amlodipine- and atenolol-based treatment. METHODS: Eight thousand five hundred and eighty hypertensive participants (4305 assigned to amlodipine ± perindopril-based and 4275 to atenolol ± diuretic-based treatment during the in-trial period (median 5.5 years) were followed for up to 21 years (median 17.4 years), using linked hospital and mortality records. A subgroup of participants (n = 2156) was followed up 6 years after the trial closure with a self-administered questionnaire and a clinic visit. In-trial mean SBP and standard deviation of visit-to-visit SBP as a measure of BPV, were measured using >100 000 BP measurements. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk [hazard ratios (HRs)], associated with (i) mean with SBP and BPV during the in-trial period, for the CV endpoints occurring after the end of the trial and (ii) randomly assigned treatment to events following randomization, for the first occurrence of pre-specified CV outcomes. RESULTS: Using BP data from the in-trial period, in the post-trial period, although mean SBP was a predictor of CV outcomes {HR per 10 mmHg, 1.14 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.17], P < .001}, systolic BPV independent of mean SBP was a strong predictor of CV events [HR per 5 mmHg 1.22 (95% CI 1.18-1.26), P < .001] and predicted events even in participants with well-controlled BP. During 21-year follow-up, those on amlodipine-based compared with atenolol-

Journal article

Bidel Z, Nazarzadeh M, Canoy D, Copland E, Gerdts E, Woodward M, Gupta AK, Reid CM, Cushman WC, Wachtell K, Teo K, Davis BR, Chalmers J, Pepine CJ, Rahimi K, Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment Trialists Collaborationet al., 2023, Sex-Specific Effects of Blood Pressure Lowering Pharmacotherapy for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: An Individual Participant-Level Data Meta-Analysis., Hypertension, Vol: 80, Pages: 2293-2302

BACKGROUND: Whether the relative effects of blood pressure (BP)-lowering treatment on cardiovascular outcomes differ by sex, particularly when BP is not substantially elevated, has been uncertain. METHODS: We conducted an individual participant-level data meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of pharmacological BP lowering. We pooled the data and categorized participants by sex, systolic BP categories in 10-mm Hg increments from <120 to ≥170 mm Hg, and age categories spanning from <55 to ≥85 years. We used fixed-effect one-stage individual participant-level data meta-analyses and applied Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by trial, to analyze the data. RESULTS: We included data from 51 randomized controlled trials involving 358 636 (42% women) participants. Over 4.2 years of median follow-up, a 5-mm Hg reduction in systolic BP decreased the risk of major cardiovascular events both in women and men (hazard ratio [95% CI], 0.92 [0.89-0.95] for women and 0.90 [0.88-0.93] for men; P for interaction, 1). There was no evidence for heterogeneity of relative treatment effects by sex for the major cardiovascular disease, its components, or across the different baseline BP categories (all P for interaction, ≥0.57). The effects in women and men were consistent across age categories and the types of antihypertensive medications (all P for interaction, ≥0.14). CONCLUSIONS: The effects of BP reduction were similar in women and men across all BP and age categories at randomization and with no evidence to suggest that drug classes had differing effects by sex. This study does not substantiate sex-based differences in BP-lowering treatment.

Journal article

Maniero C, Ng SM, Collett G, Godec T, Siddiqui I, Antoniou S, Kumar A, Janmohamed A, Nair S, Kotecha A, Khan R, Khanji MY, Kapil V, Gupta J, Gupta AKet al., 2023, Differential impact of COVID-19 on mental health and burnout, OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE-OXFORD, ISSN: 0962-7480

Journal article

Khanji MY, Collett G, Godec T, Maniero C, Ng SM, Siddiqui I, Gupta J, Kapil V, Gupta Aet al., 2023, Improved lifestyle is associated with improved depression, anxiety and well-being over time in UK healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic: insights from the CoPE-HCP cohort study, GENERAL PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 36, ISSN: 2096-5923

Journal article

Maniero C, Lopuszko A, Papalois KB, Gupta A, Kapil V, Khanji MYet al., 2023, Non-pharmacological factors for hypertension management: a systematic review of international guidelines, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 30, Pages: 17-33, ISSN: 2047-4873

Journal article

Sever P, Gupta A, Whiteley W, Godec T, Rostamian S, Mackay J, Poulter N, Whitehouse Aet al., 2023, The ASCOT legacy cohort: the long-term effects of blood pressure and blood pressure variability on cardiovascular and renal outcomes, 29th Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH), Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, Pages: E67-E68, ISSN: 0263-6352

Conference paper

Gee LC, Massimo G, Lau C, Primus C, Fernandes D, Chen J, Rathod KS, Hamers AJP, Filomena F, Nuredini G, Ibrahim AS, Khambata RS, Gupta AK, Moon JC, Kapil V, Ahluwalia Aet al., 2022, Inorganic nitrate attenuates cardiac dysfunction: roles for xanthine oxidoreductase and nitric oxide, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 179, Pages: 4757-4777, ISSN: 0007-1188

Journal article

Kapil V, Collett G, Godec T, Gupta J, Maniero C, Ng SM, McIntosh I, Kumar A, Nair S, Kotecha A, Janmohamed A, Antoniou S, Khan R, Khanji MY, Siddiqui I, Gupta Aet al., 2022, Longitudinal comparisons of mental health, burnout and well-being in patient-facing, non-patient-facing, healthcare professionals and non-healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic: findings from the CoPE-HCP study, BJPSYCH OPEN, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2056-4724

Journal article

Collaborat CTTC, Reith C, Baigent C, Blackwell L, Emberson J, Spata E, Davies K, Halls H, Holland L, Wilson K, Armitage J, Harper C, Preiss D, Roddick A, Keech A, Simes J, Collins R, Fulcher J, Herrington WG, Kirby A, Mihaylova B, O'Connell R, Banks E, Blastland M, Evans S, Temple R, Weissberg P, Wittes J, Blazing M, Braunwald E, de Lemos J, Murphy S, Pedersen TR, Pfeffer M, White H, Wiviott S, Clearfield M, Downs JR, Gotto A, Weis S, Fellstroem B, Holdaas H, Jardine A, Gordon D, Davis B, Furberg C, Grimm R, Pressel S, Probstfield J, Rahman M, Simpson Let al., 2022, Effect of statin therapy on muscle symptoms: an individual participant data meta-analysis of large-scale, randomised, double-blind trials, The Lancet, Vol: 400, Pages: 832-845, ISSN: 0140-6736

BackgroundStatin therapy is effective for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and is widely prescribed, but there are persisting concerns that statin therapy might frequently cause muscle pain or weakness. We aimed to address these through an individual participant data meta-analysis of all recorded adverse muscle events in large, long-term, randomised, double-blind trials of statin therapy.MethodsRandomised trials of statin therapy were eligible if they aimed to recruit at least 1000 participants with a scheduled treatment duration of at least 2 years, and involved a double-blind comparison of statin versus placebo or of a more intensive versus a less intensive statin regimen. We analysed individual participant data from 19 double-blind trials of statin versus placebo (n=123 940) and four double-blind trials of a more intensive versus a less intensive statin regimen (n=30 724). Standard inverse-variance-weighted meta-analyses of the effects on muscle outcomes were conducted according to a prespecified protocol.FindingsAmong 19 placebo-controlled trials (mean age 63 years [SD 8], with 34 533 [27·9%] women, 59 610 [48·1%] participants with previous vascular disease, and 22 925 [18·5%] participants with diabetes), during a weighted average median follow-up of 4·3 years, 16 835 (27·1%) allocated statin versus 16 446 (26·6%) allocated placebo reported muscle pain or weakness (rate ratio [RR] 1·03; 95% CI 1·01–1·06). During year 1, statin therapy produced a 7% relative increase in muscle pain or weakness (1·07; 1·04–1·10), corresponding to an absolute excess rate of 11 (6–16) events per 1000 person-years, which indicates that only one in 15 ([1·07–1·00]/1·07) of these muscle-related reports by participants allocated to statin therapy were actually due to the statin. After year 1, there was no significant excess in first rep

Journal article

Nazarzadeh M, Bidel Z, Canoy D, Copland E, Bennett DA, Dehghan A, Davey Smith G, Holman RR, Woodward M, Gupta A, Adler AI, Wamil M, Sattar N, Cushman WC, McManus RJ, Teo K, Davis BR, Chalmers J, Pepine CJ, Rahimi K, Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment Trialists' Collaborationet al., 2022, Blood pressure-lowering treatment for prevention of major cardiovascular diseases in people with and without type 2 diabetes: an individual participant-level data meta-analysis, The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vol: 10, Pages: 645-654, ISSN: 2213-8595

BACKGROUND: Controversy exists as to whether the threshold for blood pressure-lowering treatment should differ between people with and without type 2 diabetes. We aimed to investigate the effects of blood pressure-lowering treatment on the risk of major cardiovascular events by type 2 diabetes status, as well as by baseline levels of systolic blood pressure. METHODS: We conducted a one-stage individual participant-level data meta-analysis of major randomised controlled trials using the Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment Trialists' Collaboration dataset. Trials with information on type 2 diabetes status at baseline were eligible if they compared blood pressure-lowering medications versus placebo or other classes of blood pressure-lowering medications, or an intensive versus a standard blood pressure-lowering strategy, and reported at least 1000 persons-years of follow-up in each group. Trials exclusively on participants with heart failure or with short-term therapies and acute myocardial infarction or other acute settings were excluded. We expressed treatment effect per 5 mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure on the risk of developing a major cardiovascular event as the primary outcome, defined as the first occurrence of fatal or non-fatal stroke or cerebrovascular disease, fatal or non-fatal ischaemic heart disease, or heart failure causing death or requiring hospitalisation. Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by trial, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) separately by type 2 diabetes status at baseline, with further stratification by baseline categories of systolic blood pressure (in 10 mm Hg increments from <120 mm Hg to ≥170 mm Hg). To estimate absolute risk reductions, we used a Poisson regression model over the follow-up duration. The effect of each of the five major blood pressure-lowering drug classes, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, β blockers, calcium channel blockers, and th

Journal article

Rostamian S, Godec T, Gupta A, Whiteley WN, Mackay J, Whitehouse A, Sever Pet al., 2022, Systolic blood pressure variability is a major risk factor for renal outcomes in hypertensive patients: Evidence from the 20-year follow-up of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT), Publisher: SPRINGERNATURE, Pages: 21-21, ISSN: 0950-9240

Conference paper

Canoy D, Copland E, Nazarzadeh M, Ramakrishnan R, Pinho-Gomes A-C, Salam A, Dwyer JP, Farzadfar F, Sundstrom J, Woodward M, Davis BR, Rahimi Ket al., 2022, Antihypertensive drug effects on long-term blood pressure: an individual-level data meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials, HEART, Vol: 108, Pages: 1281-1289, ISSN: 1355-6037

Journal article

Kottke TE, Gupta AK, Thomas RJ, 2022, Failing Cardiovascular Health A Population Code Blue, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 80, Pages: 152-154, ISSN: 0735-1097

Journal article

Oggero S, Godec T, van Gorp R, Pinto AL, Schurgers LJ, Reutelingsperger C, Sever P, Norling LV, Perretti M, Gupta Aet al., 2022, Role of plasma extracellular vesicles in prediction of cardiovascular risk and alterations in response to statin therapy in hypertensive patients., Journal of Hypertension, Vol: 40, ISSN: 0263-6352

BACKGROUND: Rapid and accurate new biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are essential. The utility of extracellular vesicles in predicting the CVD risk is postulated, yet it remains unknown whether their expression is altered in response to statin therapy. METHODS: We performed in-vitro studies with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC), and conducted a nested case-control study (nCCS) in hypertensive patients (n = 40) randomized to either atorvastatin or placebo in the ASCOT-LLA. Cases had a major adverse cardiovascular event or death (MACE) during 3.5 years of follow-up (median) from the time of extracellular vesicle characterization while controls, matched for age and duration of treatment, remained event-free. Conditional logistic regression models determined the risk of MACE. Additionally, the relationship of extracellular vesicle levels with statin therapy was assessed. RESULTS: Added to HUVEC, extracellular vesicles increased neutrophil recruitment, and to hVSMC, aggravated calcification and proliferation. In the nCCS, compared with controls, cases (i.e. with MACE) had preceding higher levels of CD14+ and CD14+/CD41+ extracellular vesicles (P = 0.009 and P = 0.012, respectively) and a significant reduction in the median size of the vesicles (P = 0.037). On matched analysis, higher CD14+ extracellular vesicles were associated with a 3.7-fold increased risk of MACE (P = 0.032). Patients treated with atorvastatin (vs. placebo) had both reduced size of extracellular vesicles and the proportion of CD146+ extracellular vesicles (P = 0.034 and P = 0.020, respectively). CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: These pilot analyses suggest a mechanistic role for extracellular vesicles in the development of CVD, with significant and differential changes in extracellular vesicles amongst those at risk of MACE, and those on atorvastatin therapy.

Journal article

Ng SM, Pan J, Gupta AK, 2022, Poor achievement of lipid targets after acute coronary syndrome: what can we improve?, MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, Vol: 216, Pages: 458-459, ISSN: 0025-729X

Journal article

Ng SM, Pan J, Mouyis K, Kondapally Seshasai SR, Kapil V, Rice KM, Gupta AKet al., 2022, Quantifying the excess risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes in unvaccinated individuals with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischaemic heart disease or myocardial injury: a meta-analysis, Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2297-055X

Background: More than 80% of individuals in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are unvaccinated against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In contrast, the greatest burden of cardiovascular disease is seen in LMIC populations. Hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial injury have been variably associated with adverse COVID-19 outcomes. A systematic comparison of their impact on specific COVID-19 outcomes is lacking. We quantified the impact of DM, HTN, IHD and myocardial injury on six adverse COVID-19 outcomes: death, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), admission to intensive care (ITUadm), acute kidney injury (AKI) and severe COVID-19 disease (SCov), in an unvaccinated population.Methodology: We included studies published between 1st December 2019 and 16th July 2020 with extractable data on patients ≥18 years of age with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. Odds ratios (OR) for the association between DM, HTN, IHD and myocardial injury with each of six COVID-19 outcomes were measured.Results: We included 110 studies comprising 48,809 COVID-19 patients. Myocardial injury had the strongest association for all six adverse COVID-19 outcomes [death: OR 8.85 95% CI (8.08–9.68), ARDS: 5.70 (4.48–7.24), IMV: 3.42 (2.92–4.01), ITUadm: 4.85 (3.94–6.05), AKI: 10.49 (6.55–16.78), SCov: 5.10 (4.26–6.05)]. HTN and DM were also significantly associated with death, ARDS, ITUadm, AKI and SCov. There was substantial heterogeneity in the results, partly explained by differences in age, gender, geographical region and recruitment period.Conclusion: COVID-19 patients with myocardial injury are at substantially greater risk of death, severe disease and other adverse outcomes. Weaker, yet significant associations are present in patients with HTN, DM and IHD. Quantifying these associations is important for risk stratification, resource allocat

Journal article

Boulestreau R, van den Born B-JH, Lip GYH, Gupta Aet al., 2022, Malignant Hypertension: Current Perspectives and Challenges, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, Vol: 11

Journal article

Whiteley WN, Gupta AK, Godec T, Rostamian S, Whitehouse A, Mackay J, Sever PSet al., 2021, Long-Term Incidence of Stroke and Dementia in ASCOT, STROKE, Vol: 52, Pages: 3088-3096, ISSN: 0039-2499

Journal article

Rahimi K, Bidel Z, Nazarzadeh M, Copland E, Canoy D, Wamil M, Majert J, McManus RJ, Chalmers J, Davis BR, Pepine CJ, Teo KKet al., 2021, Age-stratified and blood-pressure-stratified effects of blood-pressure-lowering pharmacotherapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and death: an individual participant-level data meta-analysis, The Lancet, Vol: 398, Pages: 1053-1064, ISSN: 0140-6736

BackgroundThe effects of pharmacological blood-pressure-lowering on cardiovascular outcomes in individuals aged 70 years and older, particularly when blood pressure is not substantially increased, is uncertain. We compared the effects of blood-pressure-lowering treatment on the risk of major cardiovascular events in groups of patients stratified by age and blood pressure at baseline.MethodsWe did a meta-analysis using individual participant-level data from randomised controlled trials of pharmacological blood-pressure-lowering versus placebo or other classes of blood-pressure-lowering medications, or between more versus less intensive treatment strategies, which had at least 1000 persons-years of follow-up in each treatment group. Participants with previous history of heart failure were excluded. Data were obtained from the Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment Triallists' Collaboration. We pooled the data and categorised participants into baseline age groups (<55 years, 55–64 years, 65–74 years, 75–84 years, and ≥85 years) and blood pressure categories (in 10 mm Hg increments from <120 mm Hg to ≥170 mm Hg systolic blood pressure and from <70 mm Hg to ≥110 mm Hg diastolic). We used a fixed effects one-stage approach and applied Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by trial, to analyse the data. The primary outcome was defined as either a composite of fatal or non-fatal stroke, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction or ischaemic heart disease, or heart failure causing death or requiring hospital admission.FindingsWe included data from 358 707 participants from 51 randomised clinical trials. The age of participants at randomisation ranged from 21 years to 105 years (median 65 years [IQR 59–75]), with 42 960 (12·0%) participants younger than 55 years, 128 437 (35·8%) aged 55–64 years, 128 506 (35·8%) 65–74 years, 54 016 (15·1%) 75–84 years, and

Journal article

Chong JH, Chahal CAA, Gupta A, Ricci F, Westwood M, Pugliese F, Petersen SE, Khanji MYet al., 2021, COVID-19 and the Digitalisation of Cardiovascular Training and Education-A Review of Guiding Themes for Equitable and Effective Post-graduate Telelearning, FRONTIERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2297-055X

Journal article

Gupta AK, 2021, <i>JAHA</i> Spotlight on Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Disease: A Call for Urgent Action, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2047-9980

Journal article

Rahimi K, 2021, Pharmacological blood pressure lowering for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease across different levels of blood pressure: an individual participant-level data meta-analysis, The Lancet, Vol: 397, Pages: 1625-1636, ISSN: 0140-6736

BackgroundThe effects of pharmacological blood pressure lowering at normal or high-normal blood pressure ranges in people with or without pre-existing cardiovascular disease remains uncertain. We analysed individual participant data from randomised trials to investigate the effects of blood pressure lowering treatment on the risk of major cardiovascular events by baseline levels of systolic blood pressure.MethodsWe did a meta-analysis of individual participant-level data from 48 randomised trials of pharmacological blood pressure lowering medications versus placebo or other classes of blood pressure-lowering medications, or between more versus less intensive treatment regimens, which had at least 1000 persons-years of follow-up in each group. Trials exclusively done with participants with heart failure or short-term interventions in participants with acute myocardial infarction or other acute settings were excluded. Data from 51 studies published between 1972 and 2013 were obtained by the Blood Pressure Lowering Treatment Trialists' Collaboration (Oxford University, Oxford, UK). We pooled the data to investigate the stratified effects of blood pressure-lowering treatment in participants with and without prevalent cardiovascular disease (ie, any reports of stroke, myocardial infarction, or ischaemic heart disease before randomisation), overall and across seven systolic blood pressure categories (ranging from <120 to ≥170 mm Hg). The primary outcome was a major cardiovascular event (defined as a composite of fatal and non-fatal stroke, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction or ischaemic heart disease, or heart failure causing death or requiring admission to hospital), analysed as per intention to treat.FindingsData for 344 716 participants from 48 randomised clinical trials were available for this analysis. Pre-randomisation mean systolic/diastolic blood pressures were 146/84 mm Hg in participants with previous cardiovascular disease (n=157 728) and 157/89 mm

Journal article

Copland E, Canoy D, Nazarzadeh M, Bidel Z, Ramakrishnan R, Woodward M, Chalmers J, Teo KK, Pepine CJ, Davis BR, Kjeldsen S, Sundstrom J, Rahimi Ket al., 2021, Antihypertensive treatment and risk of cancer: an individual participant data meta-analysis, The Lancet Oncology, Vol: 22, Pages: 558-570, ISSN: 1213-9432

BackgroundSome studies have suggested a link between antihypertensive medication and cancer, but the evidence is so far inconclusive. Thus, we aimed to investigate this association in a large individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials.MethodsWe searched PubMed, MEDLINE, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov from Jan 1, 1966, to Sept 1, 2019, to identify potentially eligible randomised controlled trials. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials comparing one blood pressure lowering drug class with a placebo, inactive control, or other blood pressure lowering drug. We also required that trials had at least 1000 participant years of follow-up in each treatment group. Trials without cancer event information were excluded. We requested individual participant data from the authors of eligible trials. We pooled individual participant-level data from eligible trials and assessed the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), β blockers, calcium channel blockers, and thiazide diuretics on cancer risk in one-stage individual participant data and network meta-analyses. Cause-specific fixed-effects Cox regression models, stratified by trial, were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). The primary outcome was any cancer event, defined as the first occurrence of any cancer diagnosed after randomisation. This study is registered with PROSPERO (CRD42018099283).Findings33 trials met the inclusion criteria, and included 260 447 participants with 15 012 cancer events. Median follow-up of included participants was 4·2 years (IQR 3·0–5·0). In the individual participant data meta-analysis comparing each drug class with all other comparators, no associations were identified between any antihypertensive drug class and risk of any cancer (HR 0·99 [95% CI 0·95–1·04] for ACEIs; 0·96 [0·92&nda

Journal article

Gupta A, Godec T, Mackay J, Whitehouse A, Rostamian S, Collier T, Poulter N, Sever Pet al., 2021, INFLUENCE OF AGE, SEX AND AN OCCURRENCE OF CARDIOVASCULAR EVENT ON SEASONAL VARIATIONS IN BLOOD PRESSURES IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS: INSIGHTS FROM THE ASCOT COHORT, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, Pages: E145-E146, ISSN: 0263-6352

Conference paper

Gupta A, Whiteley W, Godec T, Rostamian S, Whitehouse A, Mackay J, Sever Pet al., 2021, LONG TERM BENEFITS OF BLOOD PRESSURE TREATMENT ON THE INCIDENCE OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, HEART FAILURE AND CARDIOVASCULAR MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY: 20-YEARS FOLLOW-UP OF ASCOT-LEGACY, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, Pages: E8-E8, ISSN: 0263-6352

Conference paper

Gupta A, Rostamian S, Mackay J, Godec T, Whitehouse A, Poulter N, Sever Pet al., 2021, THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESISTANT HYPERTENSION INDEPENDENT OF THE PRECEDING PERIOD OF THE BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL IS ASSOCIATED WITH THE INCREASED RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS AND DEATH, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, Pages: E358-E358, ISSN: 0263-6352

Conference paper

Warren H, Traylor M, Garofalidou T, Ng FL, Gupta A, Sever P, Caulfield M, Munroe Pet al., 2021, HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH GREATER GENETIC RISK RESPOND LESS EFFECTIVELY TO TREATMENT AND ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE TREATMENT RESISTANT, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, Pages: E359-E359, ISSN: 0263-6352

Conference paper

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