Imperial College London

Angela Kedgley

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Bioengineering

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0747a.kedgley Website

 
 
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Location

 

514BBuilding E - Sir Michael UrenWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Amabile:2016:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.03.035,
author = {Amabile, C and Bull, A and Kedgley, A},
doi = {10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.03.035},
journal = {Journal of Biomechanics},
pages = {1938--1943},
title = {The centre of rotation of the shoulder complex and the effect of normalisation},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.03.035},
volume = {49},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Shoulder motions consist of a composite movement of three joints and one pseudo-joint, which together dictate the humerothoracic motion. The purpose of this work was to quantify the location of the centre of rotation (CoR) of the shoulder complex as a whole. Dynamic motion of 12 participants was recorded using optical motion tracking during coronal, scapular and sagittal plane elevation. The instantaneous CoR was found for each angle of elevation using helical axes projected onto the three planes of motion. The location of an average CoR for each plane was evaluated using digitised and anthropometric measures for normalisation. When conducting motion in the coronal, scapular, and sagittal planes respectively, the coefficients for locating the CoRs of the shoulder complex are −61%, −61%, and −65% of the anterior-posterior dimension – the vector between the midpoint of the incisura jugularis and the xiphoid process and the midpoint of the seventh cervical vertebra and the eighth thoracic vertebra; 0%, −1%, and −2% of the superior-inferior dimension – the vector between the midpoint of the acromioclavicular joints and the midpoint of the anterior superior iliac spines; and 57%, 57%, and 78% of the medial-lateral dimension −0.129 times the height of the participant. Knowing the location of the CoR of the shoulder complex as a whole enables improved participant positioning for evaluation and rehabilitation activities that involve movement of the hand with a fixed radius, such as those that employ isokinetic dynamometers.
AU - Amabile,C
AU - Bull,A
AU - Kedgley,A
DO - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.03.035
EP - 1943
PY - 2016///
SN - 1873-2380
SP - 1938
TI - The centre of rotation of the shoulder complex and the effect of normalisation
T2 - Journal of Biomechanics
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.03.035
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/30432
VL - 49
ER -