Imperial College London

DrAnamParand

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9726a.parand

 
 
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Location

 

507Medical SchoolSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

53 results found

Kirwan B, Reader T, Parand A, 2018, The safety culture stack – the next evolution of safety culture?, Safety and Reliability, Vol: 38, Pages: 200-217, ISSN: 0961-7353

Journal article

Parand A, Faiella G, Franklin BD, Johnston M, Clemente F, Stanton NA, Sevdalis Net al., 2018, A prospective risk assessment of informal carers' medication administration errors within the domiciliary setting, ERGONOMICS, Vol: 61, Pages: 104-121, ISSN: 0014-0139

Journal article

Parand A, Garfield S, Vincent C, Franklin Bet al., 2016, Carers’ medication administration errors in the domiciliary setting: a systematic review, PLOS One, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1932-6203

PURPOSE Medications are mostly taken in patients’ own homes, increasingly administered by carers, yet studies of medication safety have been largely conducted in the hospital setting. We aimed to review studies of how carers cause and/or prevent medication administration errors (MAEs) within the patient’s home; to identify types, prevalence and causes of these MAEs and any interventions to prevent them. METHODS A narrative systematic review of literature published between 1 Jan 1946 and 23 Sep 2013 was carried out across the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, COCHRANE and CINAHL. Empirical studies were included where carers were responsible for preventing/causing MAEs in the home and standardised tools used for data extraction and quality assessment.RESULTS Thirty-six papers met the criteria for narrative review, 33 of which included parents caring for children, two predominantly comprised adult children and spouses caring for older parents/partners, and one focused on paid carers mostly looking after older adults. The carer administration error rate ranged from 1.9 to 33% of medications administered and from 12 to 92.7% of carers administering medication. These included dosage errors, omitted administration, wrong medication and wrong time or route of administration. Contributory factors included individual carer factors (e.g. carer age), environmental factors (e.g. storage), medication factors (e.g. number of medicines), prescription communication factors (e.g. comprehensibility of instructions), psychosocial factors (e.g. carer-to-carer communication), and care-recipient factors (e.g. recipient age). The few interventions effective in preventing MAEs involved carer training and tailored equipment. CONCLUSION This review shows that home medication administration errors made by carers are a potentially serious patient safety issue. Carers made similar errors to those made by professionals in other contexts and a wide variety of contributory factors w

Journal article

Kapur N, Parand A, Soukup T, Reader T, Sevdalis Net al., 2016, Aviation and healthcare: a comparative review with implications for patient safety., JRSM Open, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2054-2704

Safety in aviation has often been compared with safety in healthcare. Following a recent article in this journal, the UK government set up an Independent Patient Safety Investigation Service, to emulate a similar well-established body in aviation. On the basis of a detailed review of relevant publications that examine patient safety in the context of aviation practice, we have drawn up a table of comparative features and a conceptual framework for patient safety. Convergence and divergence of safety-related behaviours across aviation and healthcare were derived and documented. Key safety-related domains that emerged included Checklists, Training, Crew Resource Management, Sterile Cockpit, Investigation and Reporting of Incidents and Organisational Culture. We conclude that whilst healthcare has much to learn from aviation in certain key domains, the transfer of lessons from aviation to healthcare needs to be nuanced, with the specific characteristics and needs of healthcare borne in mind. On the basis of this review, it is recommended that healthcare should emulate aviation in its resourcing of staff who specialise in human factors and related psychological aspects of patient safety and staff wellbeing. Professional and post-qualification staff training could specifically include Cognitive Bias Avoidance Training, as this appears to play a key part in many errors relating to patient safety and staff wellbeing.

Journal article

Wheelock A, Parand A, Rigole B, Thomson A, Miraldo M, Vincent C, Sevdalis Net al., 2015, Socio-Psychological Factors Driving Adult Vaccination: A Qualitative Study (vol 9, e113503, 2014), PLOS ONE, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Davis R, Parand A, Pinto A, Buetow Set al., 2015, Systematic review of the effectiveness of strategies to encourage patients to remind healthcare professionals about their hand hygiene, JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL INFECTION, Vol: 89, Pages: 141-162, ISSN: 0195-6701

Journal article

Subashini M, Caris J, Parand A, Vlaev I, Darzi Aet al., 2015, Impact of PROMs on Clinician Behaviour Study, International Surgical Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland (ASGBI), Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 148-148, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Miraldo M, Wheelock A, Parand A, Rigole B, Thomson A, Vincent C, Sevdalis Net al., 2014, Socio-psychological factors driving adult vaccination: a qualitative study, PLoS ONE, Vol: 9, ISSN: 1932-6203

Background: While immunization is one of the most effective and successfulpublic health interventions, there are still up to 30,000 deaths in major developedeconomies each year due to vaccine-preventable diseases, almost all in adults. Inthe UK, despite comparatively high vaccination rates among§65 s (73%) and, to alesser extent, at-risk #65 s (52%) in 2013/2014, over 10,000 excess deaths werereported the previous influenza season. Adult tetanus vaccines are not routinelyrecommended in the UK, but may be overly administered. Social influences andrisk-perceptions of diseases and vaccines are known to affect vaccine uptake. Weaimed to explore the socio-psychological factors that drive adult vaccination in theUK, specifically influenza and tetanus, and to evaluate whether these factors arecomparable between vaccines.Methods: 20 in-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with members of theUK public who represented a range of socio-demographic characteristicsassociated with vaccination uptake. We employed qualitative interviewingapproaches to reach a comprehensive understanding of the factors influencingadult vaccination decisions. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.Results: Participants were classified according to their vaccination status asregular, intermittent and non-vaccinators for influenza, and preventative, injury-led,mixed (both preventative and injury-led) and as non-vaccinators for tetanus. Wepresent our finding around five overarching themes: 1) perceived health and healthbehaviors; 2) knowledge; 3) vaccination influences; 4) disease appraisal; and 5)vaccination appraisal.Conclusion: The uptake of influenza and tetanus vaccines was largely driven byparticipants’ risk perception of these diseases. The tetanus vaccine is perceived assafe and sufficiently tested, whereas the changing composition of the influenzavaccine is a cause of uncertainty and distrust. To maximize the public health impact of adult vaccines, policy should be b

Journal article

Wheelock A, Miraldo M, Parand A, Vincent C, Sevdalis Net al., 2014, Journey to vaccination: a protocol for a multinational qualitative study, BMJ Open, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2044-6055

Introduction In the past two decades, childhood vaccination coverage has increased dramatically, averting an estimated 2–3 million deaths per year. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains inconsistently recorded and substandard. Although structural barriers are known to limit coverage, social and psychological factors can also affect vaccine uptake. Previous qualitative studies have explored beliefs, attitudes and preferences associated with seasonal influenza (flu) vaccination uptake, yet little research has investigated how participants’ context and experiences influence their vaccination decision-making process over time. This paper aims to provide a detailed account of a mixed methods approach designed to understand the wider constellation of social and psychological factors likely to influence adult vaccination decisions, as well as the context in which these decisions take place, in the USA, the UK, France, India, China and Brazil.Methods and analysis We employ a combination of qualitative interviewing approaches to reach a comprehensive understanding of the factors influencing vaccination decisions, specifically seasonal flu and tetanus. To elicit these factors, we developed the journey to vaccination, a new qualitative approach anchored on the heuristics and biases tradition and the customer journey mapping approach. A purposive sampling strategy is used to select participants who represent a range of key sociodemographic characteristics. Thematic analysis will be used to analyse the data. Typical journeys to vaccination will be proposed.Ethics and dissemination Vaccination uptake is significantly influenced by social and psychological factors, some of which are under-reported and poorly understood. This research will provide a deeper understanding of the barriers and drivers to adult vaccination. Our findings will be published in relevant peer-reviewed journals and presented at academic conferences. They will also be presented as practical

Journal article

Parand A, Dopson S, Renz A, Vincent Cet al., 2014, The role of hospital managers in quality and patient safety: a systematic review, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2014, The power and work of acute care managers in quality and safety: A quantitative study, The power and work of acute care managers in quality and safety: A quantitative study at the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology Annual Conference

Conference paper

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2013, A questionnaire study on the work and power of acute care managers in quality of care, PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH, Vol: 28, Pages: 135-135, ISSN: 0887-0446

Journal article

Parand A, 2013, The Role of Acute Care Managers in Quality of Care and Patient Safety

Thesis dissertation

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2013, A questionnaire study on the work and power of acute care managers in quality of care, The European Health Psychology Society Conference

Conference paper

Wyles S, Parand A, Ni M, Jenkins JT, Hanna GBet al., 2013, What lies beneath? Determining the personality of advanced laparoscopic surgeons: can a difference impact the quality of training?, SAGES

Conference paper

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2013, The role of chief executive officers in a quality improvement initiative: a qualitative study, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Parand A, Benn J, Burnett S, Pinto A, Vincent Cet al., 2012, Strategies for sustaining a quality improvement collaborative and its patient safety gains, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 24, Pages: 380-390, ISSN: 1353-4505

Journal article

Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Pinto A, Vincent Cet al., 2012, Factors predicting change in hospital safety climate and capability in a multi-site patient safety collaborative: a longitudinal survey study, BMJ QUALITY & SAFETY, Vol: 21, Pages: 559-568, ISSN: 2044-5415

Journal article

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2012, The self-reported role of chief executives in an organisation-wide quality and safety improvement collaborative, 8th International Organisational Behaviour in Healthcare Conference

Conference paper

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2012, The managerial work of middle management in quality of health care and patient safety, British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology Annual Conference

Conference paper

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2012, The managerial work of middle management in quality of health care and patient safety, British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology Annual Conference

Conference paper

Parand A, Burnett S, Benn J, Pinto A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2011, The disparity of frontline clinical staff and managers' perceptions of a quality and patient safety initiative, JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Vol: 17, Pages: 1184-1190, ISSN: 1356-1294

Journal article

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2011, The self-reported role of chief executives and medical directors in an organisation-wide quality and safety improvement collaborative, ISQUA

Conference paper

Parand A, Dopson S, Pellett J, Vincent Cet al., 2011, What is the role of middle managers in quality and safety, ISQUA

Conference paper

Parand A, Dopson S, Vincent C, 2011, How do managers make health care safer?, Making Health Care Safer: Learning from Social and Organisational Research

Conference paper

Pinto A, Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Vincent Cet al., 2011, Predictors of the perceived impact of a patient safety collaborative: an exploratory study, International Journal for Quality in Health Care, Vol: 23, Pages: 173-181

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of various factors on the perceived impact of a patient safety improvement collaborative in the UK, the Safer Patients Initiative (SPI).Study design A cross-sectional survey design was used.Study setting Twenty National Health Service organizations from the UK that participated in the main phase of the SPI programme, which ran from September 2007 to 2008.Participants Senior executive leads, clinical operational leads in the four clinical areas targeted by the programme, programme coordinators and any other staff involved in the SPI (n= 635).Intervention The SPI is a patient safety improvement intervention based on the Breakthrough Series Collaborative model (Institute of Healthcare Improvement, 2004) aimed at improving patient safety in four clinical areas (general ward care, intensive care, perioperative care and pharmacy) through implementing a number of evidence-based clinical practices and a focus on organizational leadership.Outcome measures Participant perceptions of the impact of the programme on their organizations.Results Exploratory regression analysis showed that programme management, the value assigned to programme methodology and length of data collection contributed the largest variance in perceived impact of the SPI followed by perceived support from junior doctors, inter-professional collaboration, difference of the programme from existing safety improvement practices and organizational readiness.Conclusions The resulting model suggests hierarchical importance for a range of variables to support future research concerning the mechanisms by which large-scale organizational programmes, such as the SPI, impact on the care systems they are designed to influence.

Journal article

Shebl N, Franklin B, Barber N, Burnett S, Parand Aet al., 2011, Failure Mode and Effects Analysis: views of hospital staff in the UK, Journal of health services research & policy

OBJECTIVE: To explore health care professionals' experiences and perceptions of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), a team-based, prospective risk analysis technique. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 operational leads (20 pharmacists, one nurse) in medicines management teams of hospitals participating in a national quality improvement programme. Interviews were transcribed, coded and emergent themes identified using framework analysis. RESULTS: Themes identified included perceptions and experiences of participants with FMEA, validity and reliability issues, and FMEA's use in practice. FMEA was considered to be a structured but subjective process that helps health care professionals get together to identify high risk areas of care. Both positive and negative opinions were expressed, with the majority of interviewees expressing positive views towards FMEA in relation to its structured nature and the use of a multidisciplinary team. Other participants criticised FMEA for being subjective and lacking validity. Most likely to restrict its widespread use were its time consuming nature and its perceived lack of validity and reliability. CONCLUSION: FMEA is a subjective but systematic tool that helps identify high risk areas, but its time consuming nature, difficulty with the scores and perceived lack of validity and reliability may limit its widespread use.

Journal article

Pinto A, Burnett S, Benn J, Brett S, Parand A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2011, Improving reliability of clinical care practices for ventilated patients in the context of a patient safety improvement initiative, Journal of evaluation in clinical practice, Vol: 17, Pages: 180-187, ISSN: 1365-2753

Journal article

Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Pinto A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2011, The journey to safety: A report of 24 NHS organisations undertaking the Safer Patients Initiative, Report for the Health Foundation

Report

Parand A, Burnett S, Benn J, Iskander S, Pinto A, Vincent Cet al., 2010, Medical engagement in organisation-wide safety and quality-improvement programmes: experience in the UK Safer Patients Initiative, QUALITY & SAFETY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1475-3898

Journal article

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