Imperial College London

Anna Pinto

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Research Associate
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9725a.pinto

 
 
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Location

 

503Wright Fleming WingSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

22 results found

Archer SA, Pinto A, Vuik S, Bicknell C, Faiz O, Byrne B, Johnston M, Skapinakis P, Athanasiou T, Vincent C, Darzi Aet al., 2019, Surgery, complications and quality of life: a longitudinal cohort study exploring the role of psychosocial factors, Annals of Surgery, Vol: 270, Pages: 95-101, ISSN: 0003-4932

Objective:To determine if psychosocial factors moderate the relationship between surgical complications and quality of life (QoL).Summary Background:Patients who experience surgical complications have significantly worse post-operative QoL than patients with an uncomplicated recovery. Psychosocial factors, such as coping style and level of social support influence how people deal with stressful events, but it is unclear if they impact on QoL following a surgical complication. These findings can inform the development of appropriate interventions that support patients post-operatively. Methods:This is a longitudinal cohort study; data were collected at pre-op, 1 month post-op, 4 months post-op and 12 months post-op. A total of 785 patients undergoing major elective gastro-intestinal, vascular or cardio-thoracic surgery were recruited from 28 National Health Service (NHS) sites in England and Scotland took part in the study.Results:Patients who experience major surgical complications report significantly reduced levels of physical and mental QoL (p<0.05) but they make a full recovery over time. Findings indicate that a range of psychosocial factors such as the use of humor as a coping style and the level of health care professional support may moderate the impact of surgical complications on QoL.Conclusion:Surgical complications alongside other socio-demographic and psychosocial factors contribute to changes in QoL; the results from this exploratory study suggest that interventions that increase the availability of healthcare professional support and promote more effective coping strategies prior to surgery may be useful, particularly in the earlier stages of recovery where QoL is most severely compromised. However, these relationships should be further explored in longitudinal studies that include other types of surgery and employ rigorous recruitment and follow up procedures.

Journal article

Pinto A, faiz O, davis R, almoudaris A, vincent Cet al., 2016, Surgical complications and their impact on patients’ psychosocial wellbeing: A systematic review and meta-analysis, BMJ Open, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objective Surgical complications may affect patients psychologically due to challenges such as prolonged recovery or long-lasting disability. Psychological distress could further delay patients’ recovery as stress delays wound healing and compromises immunity. This review investigates whether surgical complications adversely affect patients’ postoperative well-being and the duration of this impact.Methods The primary data sources were ‘PsychINFO’, ‘EMBASE’ and ‘MEDLINE’ through OvidSP (year 2000 to May 2012). The reference lists of eligible articles were also reviewed. Studies were eligible if they measured the association of complications after major surgery from 4 surgical specialties (ie, cardiac, thoracic, gastrointestinal and vascular) with adult patients’ postoperative psychosocial outcomes using validated tools or psychological assessment. 13 605 articles were identified. 2 researchers independently extracted information from the included articles on study aims, participants’ characteristics, study design, surgical procedures, surgical complications, psychosocial outcomes and findings. The studies were synthesised narratively (ie, using text). Supplementary meta-analyses of the impact of surgical complications on psychosocial outcomes were also conducted.Results 50 studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Two-thirds of the studies found that patients who suffered surgical complications had significantly worse postoperative psychosocial outcomes even after controlling for preoperative psychosocial outcomes, clinical and demographic factors. Half of the studies with significant findings reported significant adverse effects of complications on patient psychosocial outcomes at 12 months (or more) postsurgery. 3 supplementary meta-analyses were completed, 1 on anxiety (including 2 studies) and 2 on physical and mental quality of life (including 3 studies). The latter indicated statistically signi

Journal article

Byrne BE, Pinto A, Aylin P, Bottle A, Faiz OD, Vincent CAet al., 2015, Understanding how colorectal units achieve short length of stay: an interview survey among representative hospitals in England, Patient Safety in Surgery, Vol: 9

Journal article

Pinto A, Faiz O, Bicknell C, Vincent Cet al., 2014, Acute traumatic stress among surgeons after major surgical complications, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 208, Pages: 642-647, ISSN: 0002-9610

Journal article

Pinto A, Faiz O, Bicknell C, Vincent Cet al., 2013, Surgical complications and their implications for surgeons' well-being, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 100, Pages: 1748-1755, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Pinto A, Faiz O, Vincent C, 2013, Managing the after effects of serious patient safety incidents in the NHS: an online survey study (vol 89, pg 266, 2013), POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 89, Pages: 369-369, ISSN: 0032-5473

Journal article

Pinto A, Faiz O, Vincent C, 2013, Managing the after effects of serious patient safety incidents in the NHS: an online survey study (vol 21, pg 1001, 2012), BMJ QUALITY & SAFETY, Vol: 22, Pages: 520-520, ISSN: 2044-5415

Journal article

Pinto A, Faiz O, Vincent C, 2013, Managing the after effects of serious patient safety incidents in the NHS: an online survey study, POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 89, Pages: 266-273, ISSN: 0032-5473

Journal article

Pinto A, Vincent C, Darzi A, Davis Ret al., 2013, A qualitative exploration of patients' attitudes towards the 'Participate Inform Notice Know' (PINK) patient safety video, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 25, Pages: 29-34, ISSN: 1353-4505

Journal article

Pinto A, Faiz O, Vincent C, 2012, Managing the after effects of serious patient safety incidents in the NHS: an online survey study, BMJ QUALITY & SAFETY, Vol: 21, Pages: 1001-1008, ISSN: 2044-5415

Journal article

Parand A, Benn J, Burnett S, Pinto A, Vincent Cet al., 2012, Strategies for sustaining a quality improvement collaborative and its patient safety gains, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 24, Pages: 380-390, ISSN: 1353-4505

Journal article

Davis RE, Pinto A, Sevdalis N, Vincent C, Massey R, Darzi Aet al., 2012, Patients' and health care professionals' attitudes towards the PINK patient safety video., J Eval Clin Pract, Vol: 18, Pages: 848-853

RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Patients can play an important role in reducing health care harm. Finding strategies to encourage patients to take on an active role in issues related to the quality and safety of their care is therefore essential. The aim of this study was to examine patients' and health care professionals' attitudes towards a video aimed at promoting patient involvement in safety-related behaviours. METHOD: A within-subjects design was used where participants were required to complete a questionnaire pre and post screening of a patient safety video. Participants are 201 patients aged 19-103 years (mean 52) and 95 health care professionals aged 23-48 years (mean 32). Main outcome measures include (i) patients' willingness to participate and perceived importance in participating in safety-related behaviours; and (ii) health care professionals' willingness to support patient involvement. RESULTS: After watching the video patients elicited more positive attitudes towards asking doctors and nurses if they had washed their hands and notifying them about issues to do with personal hygiene. No significant effects were observed in relation to patients notifying staff if they have not received their medication or if they were in pain or feeling unwell. In relation to health care professionals, doctors and nurses were more willing to support patient involvement in asking about hand hygiene after they had watched the video. CONCLUSION: Video may be effective at changing patients' and health care professionals' attitudes towards patient involvement in some, but not all safety-related behaviours. Our findings suggest video may be most effective at encouraging involvement in behaviours patients are less inclined to participate in and health care professionals are less willing to support.

Journal article

Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Pinto A, Vincent Cet al., 2012, Factors predicting change in hospital safety climate and capability in a multi-site patient safety collaborative: a longitudinal survey study, BMJ QUALITY & SAFETY, Vol: 21, Pages: 559-568, ISSN: 2044-5415

Journal article

Parand A, Burnett S, Benn J, Pinto A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2011, The disparity of frontline clinical staff and managers' perceptions of a quality and patient safety initiative, JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Vol: 17, Pages: 1184-1190, ISSN: 1356-1294

Journal article

Lamb BW, Sevdalis S, Arora S, Pinto A, Vincent C, Green JSAet al., 2011, Teamwork and Team Decision-making at Multidisciplinary Cancer Conferences: Barriers, Facilitators, and Opportunities for Improvement, WORLD J SURG, Vol: 35, Pages: 1970-1976

Journal article

Pinto A, Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Vincent Cet al., 2011, Predictors of the perceived impact of a patient safety collaborative: an exploratory study, International Journal for Quality in Health Care, Vol: 23, Pages: 173-181

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of various factors on the perceived impact of a patient safety improvement collaborative in the UK, the Safer Patients Initiative (SPI).Study design A cross-sectional survey design was used.Study setting Twenty National Health Service organizations from the UK that participated in the main phase of the SPI programme, which ran from September 2007 to 2008.Participants Senior executive leads, clinical operational leads in the four clinical areas targeted by the programme, programme coordinators and any other staff involved in the SPI (n= 635).Intervention The SPI is a patient safety improvement intervention based on the Breakthrough Series Collaborative model (Institute of Healthcare Improvement, 2004) aimed at improving patient safety in four clinical areas (general ward care, intensive care, perioperative care and pharmacy) through implementing a number of evidence-based clinical practices and a focus on organizational leadership.Outcome measures Participant perceptions of the impact of the programme on their organizations.Results Exploratory regression analysis showed that programme management, the value assigned to programme methodology and length of data collection contributed the largest variance in perceived impact of the SPI followed by perceived support from junior doctors, inter-professional collaboration, difference of the programme from existing safety improvement practices and organizational readiness.Conclusions The resulting model suggests hierarchical importance for a range of variables to support future research concerning the mechanisms by which large-scale organizational programmes, such as the SPI, impact on the care systems they are designed to influence.

Journal article

Pinto A, Burnett S, Benn J, Brett S, Parand A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2011, Improving reliability of clinical care practices for ventilated patients in the context of a patient safety improvement initiative, Journal of evaluation in clinical practice, Vol: 17, Pages: 180-187, ISSN: 1365-2753

Journal article

Davis R, Sevdalis N, Pinto A, Darzi A, Vincent Cet al., 2011, Patients’ attitudes towards patient safety interventions: Results of two exploratory studies, Health Expectations

Journal article

Parand A, Burnett S, Benn J, Iskander S, Pinto A, Vincent Cet al., 2010, Medical engagement in organisation-wide safety and quality-improvement programmes: experience in the UK Safer Patients Initiative, QUALITY & SAFETY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1475-3898

Journal article

Burnett S, Benn J, Pinto A, Parand A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2010, Organisational readiness: exploring the preconditions for success in organisation-wide patient safety improvement programmes, QUALITY & SAFETY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 19, Pages: 313-317, ISSN: 1475-3898

Journal article

Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Pinto A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2009, Studying large-scale programmes to improve patient safety in whole care systems: Challenges for research, SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE, Vol: 69, Pages: 1767-1776, ISSN: 0277-9536

Journal article

Benn J, Burnett S, Parand A, Pinto A, Iskander S, Vincent Cet al., 2009, Perceptions of the impact of a large-scale collaborative improvement programme: Experience in the UK Safer Patients Initiative., Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, Vol: 15, Pages: 524-540

Journal article

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