Imperial College London

Professor Andy Purvis

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Research Investigator
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7942 5686a.purvis Website

 
 
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Location

 

Silwood ParkSilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

231 results found

Tudge SJ, Purvis A, De Palma A, 2021, The impacts of biofuel crops on local biodiversity: a global synthesis, BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION, Vol: 30, Pages: 2863-2883, ISSN: 0960-3115

Journal article

Turnhout E, Purvis A, 2021, Biodiversity and species extinction: categorisation, calculation, and communication, GRIFFITH LAW REVIEW, Vol: 29, Pages: 669-685, ISSN: 1038-3441

Journal article

Tudge SJ, Purvis A, De Palma A, 2020, The impacts of biofuel crops on local biodiversity: a global synthesis

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Concerns about the environmental impacts of climate change have led to increased targets for biofuel in the global energy market. First-generation biofuel crops contain oil, sugar or starch and are usually also grown for food, whereas second-generation biofuel is derived from non-food sources, including lignocellulosic crops, fast-growing trees, crop residues and waste. Increasing biofuel production drives land-use change, a major cause of biodiversity loss, but there is limited knowledge of how different first- and second-generation biofuel crops affect local biodiversity. A more detailed understanding could support better decisions about the net environmental impacts of biofuels. We synthesised data from 116 sources where a potential biofuel crop was grown and estimated how two measures of local biodiversity, species richness and total abundance, responded to different crops. Local species richness and abundance were 37% and 49% lower at sites planted with first-generation biofuel crops than in sites with primary vegetation. Soybean, wheat, maize and oil palm had the worst effects; the worst affected regions were Asia and Central and South America; and plant species richness and vertebrate abundance were the worst affected biodiversity measures. Second-generation biofuels had significantly smaller effects: species richness and abundance were 19% and 25%, respectively, lower in such sites than in primary vegetation. Our models suggest that land clearance to generate biofuel results in negative impacts on local biodiversity. However, the geographic and taxonomic variation in effects, and the variation in yields among different crops, are all relevant for making the most sustainable land-use decisions.</jats:p>

Journal article

Sanchez-Ortiz K, Taylor KJM, De Palma A, Essl F, Dawson W, Kreft H, Pergl J, Pysek P, van Kleunen M, Weigelt P, Purvis Aet al., 2020, Effects of land-use change and related pressures on alien and native subsets of island communities, PLOS ONE, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Purvis A, Jones KE, 2020, Georgina Mace (1953-2020) Pioneering conservation biologist and sustainability scientist, SCIENCE, Vol: 370, Pages: 915-915, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Cornford R, Deinet S, De Palma A, Hill SLL, McRae L, Pettit B, Marconi V, Purvis A, Freeman Ret al., 2020, Fast, scalable, and automated identification of articles for biodiversity and macroecological datasets, GLOBAL ECOLOGY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY, Vol: 30, Pages: 339-347, ISSN: 1466-822X

Journal article

Prudhomme R, De Palma A, Dumas P, Gonzalez R, Leadley P, Levrel H, Purvis A, Brunelle Tet al., 2020, Combining mitigation strategies to increase co-benefits for biodiversity and food security, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1748-9326

Journal article

Diaz S, Zafra-Calvo N, Purvis A, Verburg PH, Obura D, Leadley P, Chaplin-Kramer R, De Meester L, Dulloo E, Martin-Lopez B, Rebecca Shaw M, Visconti P, Broadgate W, Bruford MW, Burgess ND, Cavender-Bares J, DeClerck F, Maria Fernandez-Palacios J, Garibaldi LA, Hill SLL, Isbell F, Khoury CK, Krug CB, Liu J, Maron M, McGowan PJK, Pereira HM, Reyes-Garcia V, Rocha J, Rondinini C, Shannon L, Shin Y-J, Snelgrove PVR, Spehn EM, Strassburg B, Subramanian SM, Tewksbury JJ, Watson JEM, Zanne AEet al., 2020, Set ambitious goals for biodiversity and sustainability, SCIENCE, Vol: 370, Pages: 411-413, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Hoskins AJ, Harwood TD, Ware C, Williams KJ, Perry JJ, Ota N, Croft JR, Yeates DK, Jetz W, Golebiewski M, Purvis A, Robertson T, Ferrier Set al., 2020, BILBI: Supporting global biodiversity assessment through high-resolution macroecological modelling, ENVIRONMENTAL MODELLING & SOFTWARE, Vol: 132, ISSN: 1364-8152

Journal article

Leclere D, Obersteiner M, Barrett M, Butchart SHM, Chaudhary A, De Palma A, DeClerck FAJ, Di Marco M, Doelman JC, Duerauer M, Freeman R, Harfoot M, Hasegawa T, Hellweg S, Hilbers JP, Hill SLL, Humpenoeder F, Jennings N, Krisztin T, Mace GM, Ohashi H, Popp A, Purvis A, Schipper AM, Tabeau A, Valin H, van Meijl H, Van Zeist W-J, Visconti P, Alkemade R, Almond R, Bunting G, Burgess ND, Cornell SE, Di Fulvio F, Ferrier S, Fritz S, Fujimori S, Grooten M, Harwood T, Havlik P, Herrero M, Hoskins AJ, Jung M, Kram T, Lotze-Campen H, Matsui T, Meyer C, Nel D, Newbold T, Schmidt-Traub G, Stehfest E, Strassburg BBN, van Vuuren DP, Ware C, Watson JEM, Wu W, Young Let al., 2020, Bending the curve of terrestrial biodiversity needs an integrated strategy, NATURE, Vol: 585, Pages: 551-+, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

Mace GM, Barrett M, Burgess ND, Cornell SE, Freeman R, Grooten M, Purvis Aet al., 2020, Aiming higher to bend the curve of biodiversity loss (vol 52, pg 891, 2020), NATURE SUSTAINABILITY, Vol: 3, Pages: 885-885, ISSN: 2398-9629

Journal article

Bayley DT, Purvis A, Nellas AC, Arias M, Koldewey HJet al., 2020, Measuring the long-term success of small-scale marine protected areas in a Philippine reef fishery, CORAL REEFS, Vol: 39, Pages: 1591-1604, ISSN: 0722-4028

Journal article

Waldock CA, De Palma A, Borges PA, Purvis Aet al., 2020, Insect occurrence in agricultural land-uses depends on realized niche and geographic range properties, ECOGRAPHY, Vol: 43, Pages: 1717-1728, ISSN: 0906-7590

Journal article

Echeverria-Londono S, Sarkinen T, Fenton IS, Purvis A, Knapp Set al., 2020, Dynamism and context-dependency in diversification of the megadiverse plant genusSolanum(Solanaceae), JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 58, Pages: 767-782, ISSN: 1674-4918

Journal article

Rosa IMD, Purvis A, Alkemade R, Chaplin-Kramer R, Ferrier S, Guerra CA, Hurtt G, Kim H, Leadley P, Martins IS, Popp A, Schipper AM, van Vuuren D, Pereira HMet al., 2020, Challenges in producing policy-relevant global scenarios of biodiversity and ecosystem services, GLOBAL ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION, Vol: 22, ISSN: 2351-9894

Journal article

Diaz S, Settele J, Brondizio E, Ngo HT, Pfaff A, Polasky S, Agard J, Arneth A, Balvanera P, Brauman KA, Butchart SHM, Chan KMA, Garibaldi LA, Ichii K, Liu J, Subramanian SM, Midgley GF, Miloslavich P, Molnar Z, Obura D, Purvis A, Razzaque J, Reyers B, Chowdhury RR, Shin Y-J, Visseren-Hamakers I, Willis KJ, Zayas CNet al., 2020, Investments' role in ecosystem degradation Response, SCIENCE, Vol: 368, Pages: 377-377, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Pereira HM, Rosa IMD, Martins IS, Kim H, Leadley P, Popp A, van Vuuren DP, Hurtt G, Anthoni P, Arneth A, Baisero D, Chaplin-Kramer R, Chini L, Di Fulvio F, Di Marco M, Ferrier S, Fujimori S, Guerra CA, Harfoot M, Harwood TD, Hasegawa T, Haverd V, Havlík P, Hellweg S, Hilbers JP, Hill SLL, Hirata A, Hoskins AJ, Humpenöder F, Janse JH, Jetz W, Johnson JA, Krause A, Leclère D, Matsui T, Meijer JR, Merow C, Obsersteiner M, Ohashi H, Poulter B, Purvis A, Quesada B, Rondinini C, Schipper AM, Settele J, Sharp R, Stehfest E, Strassburg BBN, Takahashi K, Talluto MV, Thuiller W, Titeux N, Visconti P, Ware C, Wolf F, Alkemade Ret al., 2020, Global trends in biodiversity and ecosystem services from 1900 to 2050

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Despite the scientific consensus on the extinction crisis and its anthropogenic origin, the quantification of historical trends and of future scenarios of biodiversity and ecosystem services has been limited, due to the lack of inter-model comparisons and harmonized scenarios. Here, we present a multi-model analysis to assess the impacts of land-use and climate change from 1900 to 2050. During the 20th century provisioning services increased, but biodiversity and regulating services decreased. Similar trade-offs are projected for the coming decades, but they may be attenuated in a sustainability scenario. Future biodiversity loss from land-use change is projected to keep up with historical rates or reduce slightly, whereas losses due to climate change are projected to increase greatly. Renewed efforts are needed by governments to meet the 2050 vision of the Convention on Biological Diversity.</jats:p><jats:sec><jats:title>One Sentence Summary</jats:title><jats:p>Development pathways exist that allow for a reduction of the rates of biodiversity loss from land-use change and improvement in regulating services but climate change poses an increasing challenge.</jats:p></jats:sec>

Journal article

Purvis A, 2020, A single apex target for biodiversity would be bad news for both nature and people, NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 4, Pages: 768-769, ISSN: 2397-334X

Journal article

Newbold T, Bentley LF, Hill SLL, Edgar MJ, Horton M, Su G, Sekercioglu CH, Collen B, Purvis Aet al., 2020, Global effects of land use on biodiversity differ among functional groups, FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 34, Pages: 684-693, ISSN: 0269-8463

Journal article

Sánchez-Ortiz K, Taylor KJM, De Palma A, Essl F, Dawson W, Kreft H, Pergl J, Pyšek P, van Kleunen M, Weigelt P, Purvis Aet al., 2019, Effects of land-use change and related pressures on alien and native subsets of island communities

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Island species and habitats are particularly vulnerable to human disturbances, and anthropogenic changes are increasingly overwriting natural island biogeographic patterns. However, quantitative comparisons of how native and alien assemblages respond to human disturbances are scarce. Using data from 6,242 species of vertebrates, invertebrates and plants, from 7,718 sites on 81 islands, we model how land-use change, human population density and distance to the nearest road affect local assemblages of alien and native species on islands. We found that land-use change reduces both richness and abundance of native species, whereas the number and abundance of alien species are high in plantation forests and agricultural or urban sites. In contrast to the long-established pattern for native species (i.e., decline in species number with island isolation), more isolated islands have more alien species across most land uses than do less isolated islands. We show that alien species play a major role in the turnover of island assemblages: our models show that aliens outnumber natives among the species present at disturbed sites but absent from minimally-disturbed primary vegetation. Finally, we found a homogenization pattern for both native and alien assemblages across sites within most land uses. The declines of native species on islands in the face of human pressures, and the particular proneness to invasions of the more remote islands, highlight the need to reduce the intensity of human pressures on islands and to prevent the introduction and establishment of alien species.</jats:p>

Journal article

Diaz S, Settele J, Brondizio ES, Ngo HT, Agard J, Arneth A, Balvanera P, Brauman KA, Butchart SHM, Chan KMA, Garibaldi LA, Ichii K, Liu J, Subramanian SM, Midgley GF, Miloslavich P, Molnar Z, Obura D, Pfaff A, Polasky S, Purvis A, Razzaque J, Reyers B, Chowdhury RR, Shin Y-J, Visseren-Hamakers I, Willis KJ, Zayas CNet al., 2019, Pervasive human-driven decline of life on Earth points to the need for transformative change, SCIENCE, Vol: 366, Pages: 1327-+, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Díaz S, Settele J, Brondízio ES, Ngo HT, Agard J, Arneth A, Balvanera P, Brauman KA, Butchart SHM, Chan KMA, Garibaldi LA, Ichii K, Liu J, Subramanian SM, Midgley GF, Miloslavich P, Molnár Z, Obura D, Pfaff A, Polasky S, Purvis A, Razzaque J, Reyers B, Chowdhury RR, Shin Y-J, Visseren-Hamakers I, Willis KJ, Zayas CNet al., 2019, Pervasive human-driven decline of life on Earth points to the need for transformative change., Science, Vol: 366

The human impact on life on Earth has increased sharply since the 1970s, driven by the demands of a growing population with rising average per capita income. Nature is currently supplying more materials than ever before, but this has come at the high cost of unprecedented global declines in the extent and integrity of ecosystems, distinctness of local ecological communities, abundance and number of wild species, and the number of local domesticated varieties. Such changes reduce vital benefits that people receive from nature and threaten the quality of life of future generations. Both the benefits of an expanding economy and the costs of reducing nature's benefits are unequally distributed. The fabric of life on which we all depend-nature and its contributions to people-is unravelling rapidly. Despite the severity of the threats and lack of enough progress in tackling them to date, opportunities exist to change future trajectories through transformative action. Such action must begin immediately, however, and address the root economic, social, and technological causes of nature's deterioration.

Journal article

Hill SLL, Arnell A, Maney C, Butchart SHM, Hilton-Taylor C, Ciciarelli C, Davis C, Dinerstein E, Purvis A, Burgess NDet al., 2019, Measuring Forest Biodiversity Status and Changes Globally, FRONTIERS IN FORESTS AND GLOBAL CHANGE, Vol: 2

Journal article

Bayley DT, Mogg AOM, Purvis A, Koldewey HJet al., 2019, Evaluating the efficacy of small-scale marine protected areas for preserving reef health: A case study applying emerging monitoring technology, AQUATIC CONSERVATION-MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS, Vol: 29, Pages: 2026-2044, ISSN: 1052-7613

Journal article

Purvis A, Butchart SHM, Brondizio ES, Settele J, Diaz Set al., 2019, No inflation of threatened species, SCIENCE, Vol: 365, Pages: 767-767, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Newbold T, Sanchez-Ortiz K, De Palma A, Hill SLL, Purvis Aet al., 2019, Reply to 'The biodiversity intactness index may underestimate losses', NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 3, Pages: 864-865, ISSN: 2397-334X

Journal article

Simmons BI, Balmford A, Bladon AJ, Christie AP, De Palma A, Dicks LV, Gallego-Zamorano J, Johnston A, Martin PA, Purvis A, Rocha R, Wauchope HS, Wordley CFR, Worthington TA, Finch Tet al., 2019, Worldwide insect declines: An important message, but interpret with caution, ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 9, Pages: 3678-3680, ISSN: 2045-7758

Journal article

Jung M, Rowhani P, Newbold T, Bentley L, Purvis A, Scharlemann JPWet al., 2019, Local species assemblages are influenced more by past than current dissimilarities in photosynthetic activity, Ecography, ISSN: 0906-7590

© 2018 The Authors Most land on Earth has been changed by humans and past changes of land can have lasting influences on current species assemblages. Yet few globally representative studies explicitly consider such influences even though auxiliary data, such as from remote sensing, are readily available. Time series of satellite-derived data have been commonly used to quantify differences in land-surface attributes such as vegetation cover, which will among other things be influenced by anthropogenic land conversions and modifications. Here we quantify differences in current and past (up to five years before sampling) vegetation cover, and assess whether such differences differentially influence taxonomic and functional groups of species assemblages between spatial pairs of sites. Specifically, we correlated between-site dissimilarity in photosynthetic activity of vegetation (the enhanced vegetation index) with the corresponding dissimilarity in local species assemblage composition from a global database using a common metric for both, the Bray–Curtis index. We found that dissimilarity in species assemblage composition was on average more influenced by dissimilarity in past than current photosynthetic activity, and that the influence of past dissimilarity increased when longer time periods were considered. Responses to past dissimilarity in photosynthetic activity also differed among taxonomic groups (plants, invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals), with reptiles being among the most influenced by more dissimilar past photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, we found that assemblages dominated by smaller and more vegetation-dependent species tended to be more influenced by dissimilarity in past photosynthetic activity than prey-dependent species. Overall, our results have implications for studies that investigate species responses to current environmental changes and highlight the importance of past changes continuing to influence local speci

Journal article

Sanchez-Ortiz K, Gonzalez RE, De Palma A, Newbold T, Hill SLL, Tylianakis JM, Börger L, Lysenko I, Purvis Aet al., 2019, Land-use and related pressures have reduced biotic integrity more on islands than on mainlands

<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:p>Tracking progress towards biodiversity targets requires indicators that are sensitive to changes at policy-relevant scales, can easily be aggregated to any spatial scale and are simple to understand. The Biodiversity Intactness Index (BII), which estimates the average abundance of a diverse set of organisms in a given area relative to their reference populations, was proposed in 2005 in response to this need. A new implementation of BII was developed as part of the PREDICTS project in 2016 and has been adopted by GEO BON, IPBES and CBD. The previous global models for BII estimation could not account for pressures having different effects in different settings. Islands are a setting of particular interest: many are home to a disproportionate number of endemic species; oceanic islands may have relatively low overall species diversity because of their isolation; and the pattern and timing of human pressures can be very different from that seen on mainlands. Here, we test whether biotic integrity – as estimated by BII – has decreased more severely on islands than mainlands. We update methods previously used to estimate BII globally (Newbold et al., 2016) to allow pressure effects to differ between islands and mainlands, while also implementing some other recent improvements in modelling. We estimate BII for islands and mainlands by combining global models of how two aspects of biodiversity – overall abundance, and compositional similarity to minimally-impacted sites – have been affected by human pressures. We use these models to project high-resolution (∼1km<jats:sup>2</jats:sup>) global maps of BII for the year 2005. We calculate average BII for island and mainland biomes, countries, IPBES regions and biodiversity hotspots; and repeat our analyses using a richness-based version of BII. BII on both islands and mainlands has fallen below the values proposed as safe limits a

Journal article

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