Imperial College London

Dr Anne-Marie Russell

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Clinical Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

a.russell Website

 
 
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Location

 

G08Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

101 results found

Sugg HVR, Richards DA, Russell A-M, Burnett S, Cockcroft EJ, Coon JT, Cruickshank S, Doris FE, Hunt HA, Iles-Smith H, Kent M, Logan PA, Morgan LM, Morley N, Rafferty AM, Shepherd MH, Singh SJ, Tooze SJ, Whear Ret al., 2022, Nurses' strategies for overcoming barriers to fundamental nursing care in patients with COVID-19 caused by infection with the SARS-COV-2 virus: Results from the 'COVID-NURSE' survey, JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, ISSN: 0309-2402

Journal article

Antoniou KM, Vasarmidi E, Russell A-M, Andrejak C, Crestani B, Delcroix M, Dinh-Xuan AT, Poletti V, Sverzellati N, Vitacca M, Witzenrath M, Tonia T, Spanevello Aet al., 2022, European Respiratory Society Statement on Long COVID-19 Follow-Up., Eur Respir J

Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection frequently experience symptom burden post-acute infection or post-hospitalisation. We aim to identify optimal strategies for follow-up care that may positively impact the patient's quality-of-life (QOL).A European Respiratory Society (ERS) Task Force (TF) convened and prioritised eight clinical questions. A targeted search of the literature defined the time line of long COVID-19 as one to six months post infection and identified clinical evidence in the follow-up of patients. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria report an association of characteristics of acute infection with persistent symptoms, thromboembolic events in the follow-up period and evaluations of pulmonary physiology and imaging. Importantly, this statement reviews QOL consequences, symptom burden, disability and home care follow-up. Overall, the evidence for follow-up care for patients with long COVID-19 is limited.

Journal article

Wijsenbeek MS, Bonella F, Orsatti L, Russell A-M, Valenzuela C, Wuyts WA, Baile WFet al., 2022, Communicating with patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: can we do it better?, ERJ Open Res, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2312-0541

Communications between clinicians and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have the potential to be challenging. The variable course and poor prognosis of IPF complicate discussions around life expectancy but should not prevent clinicians from having meaningful conversations about patients' fears and needs, while acknowledging uncertainties. Patients want information about the course of their disease and management options, but the provision of information needs to be individualised to the needs and preferences of the patient. Communication from clinicians should be empathetic and take account of the patient's perceptions and concerns. Models, tools and protocols are available that can help clinicians to improve their interactions with patients. In this article, we consider the difficulties inherent in discussions with patients with IPF and their loved ones, and how clinicians might communicate with patients more effectively, from breaking the news about the diagnosis to providing support throughout the course of the disease.

Journal article

Seligman WH, Fialho L, Sillett N, Nielsen C, Baloch FM, Collis P, Demedts IKM, Fleck MP, Floriani MA, Gabriel LEK, Gagnier JJ, Keetharuth A, Londral A, Ludwig IIL, Lumbreras C, Moscoso Daza A, Muhammad N, Nader Bastos GA, Owen CW, Powers JH, Russell A-M, Smith MK, Wang TY-P, Wong EK, Woodhouse DC, Zimlichman E, Brinkman Ket al., 2021, Which outcomes are most important to measure in patients with COVID-19 and how and when should these be measured? Development of an international standard set of outcomes measures for clinical use in patients with COVID-19: a report of the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) COVID-19 Working Group, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Sugg HVR, Russell A-M, Morgan LM, Iles-Smith H, Richards DA, Morley N, Burnett S, Cockcroft EJ, Thompson Coon J, Cruickshank S, Doris FE, Hunt HA, Kent M, Logan PA, Rafferty AM, Shepherd MH, Singh SJ, Tooze SJ, Whear Ret al., 2021, Fundamental nursing care in patients with the SARS-CoV-2 virus: results from the 'COVID-NURSE' mixed methods survey into nurses' experiences of missed care and barriers to care., BMC Nurs, Vol: 20, ISSN: 1472-6955

BACKGROUND: Patient experience of nursing care is associated with safety, care quality, treatment outcomes, costs and service use. Effective nursing care includes meeting patients' fundamental physical, relational and psychosocial needs, which may be compromised by the challenges of SARS-CoV-2. No evidence-based nursing guidelines exist for patients with SARS-CoV-2. We report work to develop such a guideline. Our aim was to identify views and experiences of nursing staff on necessary nursing care for inpatients with SARS-CoV-2 (not invasively ventilated) that is omitted or delayed (missed care) and any barriers to this care. METHODS: We conducted an online mixed methods survey structured according to the Fundamentals of Care Framework. We recruited a convenience sample of UK-based nursing staff who had nursed inpatients with SARS-CoV-2 not invasively ventilated. We asked respondents to rate how well they were able to meet the needs of SARS-CoV-2 patients, compared to non-SARS-CoV-2 patients, in 15 care categories; select from a list of barriers to care; and describe examples of missed care and barriers to care. We analysed quantitative data descriptively and qualitative data using Framework Analysis, integrating data in side-by-side comparison tables. RESULTS: Of 1062 respondents, the majority rated mobility, talking and listening, non-verbal communication, communicating with significant others, and emotional wellbeing as worse for patients with SARS-CoV-2. Eight barriers were ranked within the top five in at least one of the three care areas. These were (in rank order): wearing Personal Protective Equipment, the severity of patients' conditions, inability to take items in and out of isolation rooms without donning and doffing Personal Protective Equipment, lack of time to spend with patients, lack of presence from specialised services e.g. physiotherapists, lack of knowledge about SARS-CoV-2, insufficient stock, and reluctance to spend time with patients for fear o

Journal article

Cassidy N, Fox L, Love M, Byrne I, Doyle AM, Korn B, Shanagher D, Shone T, Cullen M, Cullen T, Mullaney P, O'Carroll N, O'Dowd G, O'Sullivan T, Russell A-Met al., 2021, Fibrotic interstitial lung disease-palliative care needs: a World-Cafe qualitative study, BMJ SUPPORTIVE & PALLIATIVE CARE, ISSN: 2045-435X

Journal article

Althobiani MA, Evans RA, Alqahtani JS, Aldhahir AM, Russell A-M, Hurst JR, Porter JCet al., 2021, Home monitoring of physiology and symptoms to detect interstitial lung disease exacerbations and progression: a systematic review., ERJ Open Res, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2312-0541

BACKGROUND: Acute exacerbations (AEs) and disease progression in interstitial lung disease (ILD) pose important challenges to clinicians and patients. AEs of ILD are variable in presentation but may result in rapid progression of ILD, respiratory failure and death. However, in many cases AEs of ILD may go unrecognised so that their true impact and response to therapy is unknown. The potential for home monitoring to facilitate early, and accurate, identification of AE and/or ILD progression has gained interest. With increasing evidence available, there is a need for a systematic review on home monitoring of patients with ILD to summarise the existing data. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate the evidence for use of home monitoring for early detection of exacerbations and/or progression of ILD. METHOD: We searched Ovid-EMBASE, MEDLINE and CINAHL using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines (PROSPERO registration number CRD42020215166). RESULTS: 13 studies involving 968 patients have demonstrated that home monitoring is feasible and of potential benefit in patients with ILD. Nine studies reported that mean adherence to home monitoring was >75%, and where spirometry was performed there was a significant correlation (r=0.72-0.98, p<0.001) between home and hospital-based readings. Two studies suggested that home monitoring of forced vital capacity might facilitate detection of progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. CONCLUSION: Despite the fact that individual studies in this systematic review provide supportive evidence suggesting the feasibility and utility of home monitoring in ILD, further studies are necessary to quantify the potential of home monitoring to detect disease progression and/or AEs.

Journal article

Saketkoo LA, Frech T, Varjú C, Domsic R, Farrell J, Gordon JK, Mihai C, Sandorfi N, Shapiro L, Poole J, Volkmann ER, Lammi M, McAnally K, Alexanderson H, Pettersson H, Hant F, Kuwana M, Shah AA, Smith V, Hsu V, Kowal-Bielecka O, Assassi S, Cutolo M, Kayser C, Shanmugam VK, Vonk MC, Fligelstone K, Baldwin N, Connolly K, Ronnow A, Toth B, Suave M, Farrington S, Bernstein EJ, Crofford LJ, Czirják L, Jensen K, Hinchclif M, Hudson M, Lammi MR, Mansour J, Morgan ND, Mendoza F, Nikpour M, Pauling J, Riemekasten G, Russell A-M, Scholand MB, Seigart E, Rodriguez-Reyna TS, Hummers L, Walker U, Steen Vet al., 2021, A comprehensive framework for navigating patient care in systemic sclerosis: A global response to the need for improving the practice of diagnostic and preventive strategies in SSc., Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol, Vol: 35

Systemic sclerosis (SSc), the most lethal of rheumatologic conditions, is the cause of death in >50% of SSc cases, led by pulmonary fibrosis followed by pulmonary hypertension and then scleroderma renal crisis (SRC). Multiple other preventable and treatable SSc-related vascular, cardiac, gastrointestinal, nutritional and musculoskeletal complications can lead to disability and death. Vascular injury with subsequent inflammation transforming to irreversible fibrosis and permanent damage characterizes SSc. Organ involvement is often present early in the disease course of SSc, but requires careful history-taking and vigilance in screening to detect. Inflammation is potentially reversible provided that treatment intensity quells inflammation and other immune mechanisms. In any SSc phenotype, opportunities for early treatment are prone to be under-utilized, especially in slowly progressive phenotypes that, in contrast to severe progressive ILD, indolently accrue irreversible organ damage resulting in later-stage life-limiting complications such as pulmonary hypertension, cardiac involvement, and malnutrition. A single SSc patient visit often requires much more physician and staff time, organization, vigilance, and direct management for multiple organ systems compared to other rheumatic or pulmonary diseases. Efficiency and efficacy of comprehensive SSc care enlists trending of symptoms and bio-data. Financial sustainability of SSc care benefits from understanding insurance reimbursement and health system allocation policies for complex patients. Sharing care between recognised SSc centers and local cardiology/pulmonary/rheumatology/gastroenterology colleagues may prevent complications and poor outcomes, while providing support to local specialists. As scleroderma specialists, we offer a practical framework with tools to facilitate an optimal, comprehensive and sustainable approach to SSc care. Improved health outcomes in SSc relies upon recogntion, management and, to

Journal article

Pettersson H, Alexanderson H, Poole JL, Varga J, Regardt M, Russell A-M, Salam Y, Jensen K, Mansour J, Frech T, Feghali-Bostwick C, Varjú C, Baldwin N, Heenan M, Fligelstone K, Holmner M, Lammi MR, Scholand MB, Shapiro L, Volkmann ER, Saketkoo LAet al., 2021, Exercise as a multi-modal disease-modifying medicine in systemic sclerosis: An introduction by The Global Fellowship on Rehabilitation and Exercise in Systemic Sclerosis (G-FoRSS)., Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol, Vol: 35

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous multisystem autoimmune disease whereby its main pathological drivers of disability and damage are vascular injury, inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrosis. These mechanisms result in diffuse and diverse impairments arising from ischemic circulatory dysfunction leading to painful skin ulceration and calcinosis, neurovascular aberrations hindering gastrointestinal (GI) motility, progressive painful, incapacitating or immobilizing effects of inflammatory and fibrotic effects on the lungs, skin, articular and periarticular structures, and muscle. SSc-related impairments impede routine activities of daily living (ADLs) and disrupt three critical life areas: work, family, social/leisure, and also impact on psychological well-being. Physical activity and exercise are globally recommended; however, for connective tissue diseases, this guidance carries greater impact on inflammatory disease manifestations, recovery, and cardiovascular health. Exercise, through myogenic and vascular phenomena, naturally targets key pathogenic drivers by downregulating multiple inflammatory and fibrotic pathways in serum and tissue, while increasing circulation and vascular repair. G-FoRSS, The Global Fellowship on Rehabilitation and Exercise in Systemic Sclerosis recognizes the scientific basis of and advocates for education and research of exercise as a systemic and targeted SSc disease-modifying treatment. An overview of biophysiological mechanisms of physical activity and exercise are herein imparted for patients, clinicians, and researchers, and applied to SSc disease mechanisms, manifestations, and impairment. A preliminary guidance on exercise in SSc, a research agenda, and the current state of research and outcome measures are set forth.

Journal article

Aronson K, Danoff SK, Russell A-M, Ryerson CJ, Suzuki A, Wijsenbeek MS, Bajwah S, Bianchi P, Corte TJ, Lee JS, Lindell KO, Maher TM, Martinez FJ, Meek PM, Raghu G, Rouland G, Rudell R, Safford MM, Sheth JS, Swigris JJet al., 2021, Patient-centered Outcomes Research in Interstitial Lung Disease An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Executive Summary, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Vol: 204, Pages: 126-141, ISSN: 1073-449X

Journal article

Saketkoo LA, Russell A-M, Jensen K, Mandizha J, Tavee J, Newton J, Rivera F, Howie M, Reese R, Goodman M, Hart P, Strookappe B, De Vries J, Rosenbach M, Scholand MB, Lammi MR, Elfferich M, Lower E, Baughman RP, Sweiss N, Judson MA, Drent Met al., 2021, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Sarcoidosis: Diagnosis, Management, and Health Outcomes, DIAGNOSTICS, Vol: 11

Journal article

Richards DA, Sugg HVR, Cockcroft E, Cooper J, Cruickshank S, Doris F, Hulme C, Logan P, Iles-Smith H, Melendez-Torres GJ, Rafferty AM, Reed N, Russell A-M, Shepherd M, Singh SJ, Coon JT, Tooze S, Wootton S, Abbott R, Bethel A, Creanor S, Quinn L, Tripp H, Warren FC, Whear R, Bollen J, Hunt HA, Kent M, Morgan L, Morley N, Romanczuk Let al., 2021, COVID-NURSE: evaluation of a fundamental nursing care protocol compared with care as usual on experience of care for noninvasively ventilated patients in hospital with the SARS-CoV-2 virus-protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Castro-Sanchez E, Russell AM, Dolman L, Wells Met al., 2021, What place does nurse-led research have in the COVID-19 pandemic?, INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Vol: 68, Pages: 214-218, ISSN: 0020-8132

Journal article

Noth I, Cottin V, Chaudhuri N, Corte TJ, Johannson KA, Wijsenbeek M, Jouneau S, Michael A, Quaresma M, Rohr KB, Russell A-M, Stowasser S, Maher TM, INMARK trial investigatorset al., 2021, Home spirometry in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: data from the INMARK trial, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 58, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 0903-1936

Data from the INMARK trial were used to investigate the feasibility and validity of home spirometry as a measure of lung function decline in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).Subjects with IPF and preserved forced vital capacity (FVC) were randomised to receive nintedanib or placebo for 12 weeks followed by open-label nintedanib for 40 weeks. Clinic spirometry was conducted at baseline and weeks 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 36 and 52. Subjects were asked to perform home spirometry at least once a week and ideally daily. Correlations between home- and clinic-measured FVC and rates of change in FVC were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients.In total, 346 subjects were treated. Mean adherence to weekly home spirometry decreased over time but remained above 75% in every 4-week period. Over 52 weeks, mean adherence was 86%. Variability in change from baseline in FVC was greater when measured by home rather than clinic spirometry. Strong correlations were observed between home- and clinic-measured FVC at all time-points (r=0.72 to 0.84), but correlations between home- and clinic-measured rates of change in FVC were weak (r=0.26 for rate of decline in FVC over 52 weeks).Home spirometry was a feasible and valid measure of lung function in patients with IPF and preserved FVC, but estimates of the rate of FVC decline obtained using home spirometry were poorly correlated with those based on clinic spirometry.

Journal article

, 2021, Palliative Care in Lung Disease, Publisher: Springer International Publishing, ISBN: 9783030817879

Book

Saketkoo LA, Alexanderson H, Lammi MR, LeSage D, Jensen K, Scholand MB, Volkmann ER, Russell A-Met al., 2020, An ode to the primal tonic of dance-congratulating the Life of Breath project, LANCET RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 8, Pages: E90-E91, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Saketkoo LA, Alexanderson H, Lammi MR, LeSage D, Jensen K, Scholand MB, Volkmann ER, Russell A-Met al., 2020, An ode to the primal tonic of dance—congratulating the Life of Breath project, The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, Vol: 8, Pages: e90-e91, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Edwards C, Costello E, Cassidy N, Vick B, Russell A-Met al., 2020, Use of the patientMpower App With Home-Based Spirometry to Monitor the Symptoms and Impact of Fibrotic Lung Conditions: Longitudinal Observational Study, JMIR MHEALTH AND UHEALTH, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2291-5222

Journal article

Russell A-M, 2020, LETTER FROM ASIA-PACIFIC AND BEYOND Letter from the UK, RESPIROLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 1325-1327, ISSN: 1323-7799

Journal article

Drake TM, Docherty AB, Harrison EM, Quint JK, Adamali H, Agnew S, Babu S, Barber CM, Barratt S, Bendstrup E, Bianchi S, Castillo Villegas D, Chaudhuri N, Chua F, Coker R, Chang W, Crawshaw A, Crowley LE, Dosanjh D, Fiddler CA, Forrest IA, George PM, Gibbons MA, Groom K, Haney S, Hart SP, Heiden E, Henry M, Ho L-P, Hoyles RK, Hutchinson J, Hurley K, Jones MG, Jones S, Kokosi M, Kreuter M, Mackay LS, Mahendran S, Margaritopoulos G, Molina-Molina M, Molyneaux PL, O'Brien A, O'Reilly K, Packham A, Parfrey H, Poletti V, Porter JC, Renzoni E, Rivera-Ortega P, Russell A-M, Saini G, Spencer LG, Stella GM, Stone H, Sturney S, Thickett D, Thillai M, Wallis T, Ward K, Wells AU, West A, Wickremasinghe M, Woodhead F, Hearson G, Howard L, Baillie JK, Openshaw PJM, Semple MG, Stewart I, Jenkins RG, ISARIC4C Investigatorset al., 2020, Outcome of hospitalization for COVID-19 in patients with interstitial lung disease: an international multicenter study., American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 202, Pages: 1656-1665, ISSN: 1073-449X

RATIONALE: The impact of COVID-19 on patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) has not been established. OBJECTIVES: To assess outcomes in patients with ILD hospitalized for COVID-19 versus those without ILD in a contemporaneous age, sex and comorbidity matched population. METHODS: An international multicenter audit of patients with a prior diagnosis of ILD admitted to hospital with COVID-19 between 1 March and 1 May 2020 was undertaken and compared with patients, without ILD obtained from the ISARIC 4C cohort, admitted with COVID-19 over the same period. The primary outcome was survival. Secondary analysis distinguished IPF from non-IPF ILD and used lung function to determine the greatest risks of death. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Data from 349 patients with ILD across Europe were included, of whom 161 were admitted to hospital with laboratory or clinical evidence of COVID-19 and eligible for propensity-score matching. Overall mortality was 49% (79/161) in patients with ILD with COVID-19. After matching ILD patients with COVID-19 had higher mortality (HR 1.60, Confidence Intervals 1.17-2.18 p=0.003) compared with age, sex and co-morbidity matched controls without ILD. Patients with a Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) of <80% had an increased risk of death versus patients with FVC ≥80% (HR 1.72, 1.05-2.83). Furthermore, obese patients with ILD had an elevated risk of death (HR 2.27, 1.39-3.71). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ILD are at increased risk of death from COVID-19, particularly those with poor lung function and obesity. Stringent precautions should be taken to avoid COVID-19 in patients with ILD. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Journal article

Drake TM, Docherty AB, Harrison EM, Quint JK, Adamali H, Agnew S, Babu S, Barber CM, Barratt S, Bendstrup E, Bianchi S, Villegas DC, Chaudhuri N, Chua F, Coker R, Chang W, Crawshaw A, Crowley LE, Dosanjh D, Fiddler CA, Forrest IA, George P, Gibbons MA, Groom K, Haney S, Hart SP, Heiden E, Henry M, Ho L-P, Hoyles RK, Hutchinson J, Hurley K, Jones M, Jones S, Kokosi M, Kreuter M, MacKay L, Mahendran S, Margaritopoulos G, Molina-Molina M, Molyneaux PL, OBrien A, OReilly K, Packham A, Parfrey H, Poletti V, Porter J, Renzoni E, Rivera-Ortega P, Russell A-M, Saini G, Spencer LG, Stella GM, Stone H, Sturney S, Thickett D, Thillai M, Wallis T, Ward K, Wells AU, West A, Wickremasinghe M, Woodhead F, Hearson G, Howard L, Baillie JK, Openshaw PJM, Semple MG, Stewart I, ISARIC4C Investigators, Jenkins RGet al., 2020, Outcome of hospitalisation for COVID-19 in patients with interstitial lung disease: an international multicentre study., Publisher: bioRxiv

Rationale: The impact of COVID-19 on patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) has not been established. Objectives: To assess outcomes following COVID-19 in patients with ILD versus those without in a contemporaneous age, sex and comorbidity matched population. Methods: An international multicentre audit of patients with a prior diagnosis of ILD admitted to hospital with COVID-19 between 1 March and 1 May 2020 was undertaken and compared with patients, without ILD obtained from the ISARIC 4C cohort, admitted with COVID-19 over the same period. The primary outcome was survival. Secondary analysis distinguished IPF from non-IPF ILD and used lung function to determine the greatest risks of death. Measurements and Main Results: Data from 349 patients with ILD across Europe were included, of whom 161 were admitted to hospital with laboratory or clinical evidence of COVID-19 and eligible for propensity-score matching. Overall mortality was 49% (79/161) in patients with ILD with COVID-19. After matching ILD patients with COVID-19 had higher mortality (HR 1.60, Confidence Intervals 1.17-2.18 p=0.003) compared with age, sex and co-morbidity matched controls without ILD. Patients with a Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) of <80% had an increased risk of death versus patients with FVC ≥80% (HR 1.72, 1.05-2.83). Furthermore, obese patients with ILD had an elevated risk of death (HR 1.98, 1.13−3.46). Conclusions: Patients with ILD are at increased risk of death from COVID-19, particularly those with poor lung function and obesity. Stringent precautions should be taken to avoid COVID-19 in patients with ILD.

Working paper

Kim JW, Olive S, Jones S, Thillai M, Russell A-M, Johnson MJ, Wilson Aet al., 2020, Interstitial lung disease and specialist palliative care access: a healthcare professionals survey., BMJ Support Palliat Care

BACKGROUND: Fibrotic interstitial lung disease is an incurable disease with poor prognosis. We aimed to understand factors affecting decisions regarding referrals to specialist palliative care services and to address barriers and facilitators to referrals from healthcare professionals' perspectives. METHODS: A survey study of healthcare professionals, including respiratory physicians, interstitial lung disease nurse specialists, respiratory nurse specialists and palliative care physicians, was conducted using a questionnaire, entailing 17 questions. RESULTS: Thirty-six respondents, including 15 interstitial lung disease nurse specialists completed the questionnaire. Symptom control, psychological/spiritual support, general deterioration and end-of-life care were the most common reasons for referrals to specialist palliative care services. Most respondents felt confident in addressing palliative care needs and discussing palliative care with patients. A few participants emphasised that experienced respiratory nurse specialists are well placed to provide symptom management and to ensure continuity of patient care. Participants reported that access to palliative care could be improved by increasing collaborative work between respiratory and palliative care teams. CONCLUSIONS: Most respondents felt that enhancing access to specialist palliative care services would benefit patients. However, palliative care and respiratory care should not be considered as mutually exclusive and multidisciplinary approach is recommended.

Journal article

Saketkoo LA, Scholand MB, Lammi MR, Russell A-Met al., 2020, Patient-reported outcome measures in systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease for clinical practice and clinical trials, JOURNAL OF SCLERODERMA AND RELATED DISORDERS, Vol: 5, Pages: 48-60, ISSN: 2397-1983

Journal article

Moor CC, Wijsenbeek MS, Balestro E, Biondini D, Bondue B, Cottin V, Flewett R, Galvin L, Jones S, Molina-Molina M, Planas-Cerezales L, Prasse A, Prosch H, Russell A-M, Viegas M, Wanke G, Wuyts W, Kreuter M, Bonella Fet al., 2019, Gaps in care of patients living with pulmonary fibrosis: a joint patient and expert statement on the results of a Europe-wide survey, ERJ Open Research, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2312-0541

Introduction Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and its most common form, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), are chronic, progressive diseases resulting in increasing loss of lung function and impaired quality of life and survival. The aim of this joint expert and patient statement was to highlight the most pressing common unmet needs of patients with PF/IPF, putting forward recommendations to improve the quality of life and health outcomes throughout the patient journey.Methods Two online surveys for patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) were conducted by the European Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Related Disorders Federation (EU-IPFF) in 14 European countries.Results The surveys were answered by 286 patients and 69 HCPs, including physicians and nurses. Delays in diagnosis and timely access to interstitial lung disease specialists and pharmacological treatment have been identified as important gaps in care. Additionally, patients and HCPs reported that a greater focus on symptom-centred management, adequate information, trial information and increasing awareness of PF/IPF is required.Conclusions The surveys offer important insights into the current unmet needs of PF/IPF patients. Interventions at different points of the care pathway are needed to improve patient experience.

Journal article

Boniske T, Russell A-M, Bender E, Lian I, Palomino J, Parada N, Rahaghi F, Kaul P, Henderson A, Shah N, Robinett K, Doty J, Saketkoo Let al., 2019, COMPASSION CULTIVATION SKILL TRAINING IN MEDICINE: CONTROLLED SKILL-BUILDING INTERVENTION TRIAL IN PULMONARY CRITICAL CARE FELLOWS, CHEST Annual Meeting, Publisher: ELSEVIER, Pages: 1016A-1017A, ISSN: 0012-3692

Conference paper

van Manen MJG, Birring SS, Vancheri C, Odink AE, Hussain B, Vindigni V, Renzoni E, Russell A-M, Wapenaar M, Cottin V, Wijsenbeek MSet al., 2019, Predictors of objective cough in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Russell A-M, Datta A, Newell K, Jones S, Conway J, Saktkoo LA, Wickremasinghe Met al., 2019, Development of a patient reported experience measure (PREM) for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Maher T, Cottin V, Russell A-M, Corte T, Hammerl P, Michael A, Rohr KB, Quaresma M, Stowasser S, Noth Iet al., 2019, Correlation between home and clinic spirometry in subjects with IPF: results from the INMARK trial, European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Russell A, Shone A, Love M, Shanagher D, Byrne I, Fox L, Korn B, Doyle A, Cassidy Net al., 2019, A World Cafe Approach to Palliative Care and Planning for the Future in Fibrotic Lung Disease, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Russell AM, Wickremasinghe M, Renzoni E, Adamali H, Borril Z, Fletcher S, Maher TM, Kwong GNM, Saketkoo LA, Fleming S, Cullinan Pet al., 2018, THE IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS PATIENTS REPORTED OUTCOME MEASURE (IPF-PROM) IS RELIABLE AND VALID FOR USE IN POPULATIONS WITH IPF, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A47-A47, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

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