Imperial College London

ProfessorAlfriedVogler

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Professor of Molecular Systematics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7942 5613a.vogler

 
 
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Location

 

Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

245 results found

Andujar C, Arribas P, Lopez H, Arjona Y, Perez-Delgado A, Oromi P, Vogler AP, Emerson BCet al., 2022, Community assembly and metaphylogeography of soil biodiversity: Insights from haplotype-level community DNA metabarcoding within an oceanic island, MOLECULAR ECOLOGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 4078-4094, ISSN: 0962-1083

Journal article

Baselga A, Gomez-Rodriguez C, Araujo MB, Castro-Insua A, Arenas M, Posada D, Vogler APet al., 2022, Joint analysis of species and genetic variation to quantify the role of dispersal and environmental constraints in community turnover, Ecography: pattern and diversity in ecology, Vol: 2022, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 0906-7590

Spatial turnover of biological communities is determined by both dispersal and environmental constraints. However, we lack quantitative predictions about how these factors interact and influence turnover across genealogical scales. In this study, we have implemented a predictive framework based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to quantify the signature of dispersal and environmental constraints in community turnover. First, we simulated the distribution of haplotypes, intra-specific lineages and species in biological communities under different strengths of dispersal and environmental constraints. Our simulations show that spatial turnover rate is invariant across genealogical scales when dispersal limitation determines the species ranges. However, when environmental constraint limits species ranges, spatial turnover rates vary across genealogical scales. These simulations were used in an ABC framework to quantify the role of dispersal and environmental constraints in 16 empirical biological communities sampled from local to continental scales, including several groups of insects (both aquatic and terrestrial), molluscs and bats. In seven datasets, the observed genealogical invariance of spatial turnover, assessed with distance–decay curves, suggests a dispersal-limited scenario. In the remaining datasets, the variance in distance–decay curves across genealogical scales was best explained by various combinations of dispersal and environmental constraints. Our study illustrates how modelling spatial turnover at multiple genealogical scales (species and intraspecific lineages) provides relevant insights into the relative role of dispersal and environmental constraints in community turnover.

Journal article

Rahman MM, Burian A, Creedy TJ, Vogler APet al., 2022, DNA-based assessment of environmental degradation in an unknown fauna: The freshwater macroinvertebrates of the Indo-Burmese hotspot, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY, Vol: 59, Pages: 1644-1658, ISSN: 0021-8901

Journal article

Bian X, Garner B, Liu H, Vogler APet al., 2022, The SITE-100 project: site-based biodiversity genomics for species discovery, community ecology, and a global tree-of-life, Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2296-701X

Most insect communities are composed of evolutionary diverse lineages, but detailed phylogenetic analyses of whole communities are lacking, in particular in species-rich tropical faunas. Likewise, our knowledge of the Tree-of-Life to document life’s evolutionary diversity remains highly incomplete and especially requires the inclusion of unstudied lineages from species-rich ecosystems. Here we present the SITE-100 program, which is an attempt at building the Tree-of-Life from whole-community sampling of high-biodiversity sites around the globe. Combining the local data sets into a global tree produces an increasingly comprehensive tree, while also re-tracing evolutionary history of lineages constituting the local community. Local sets are collected in bulk in standardised passive traps and imaged with a large-scale high-resolution camera, which is followed by a parataxonomy step for the preliminary separation of morphospecies and selection of specimens for phylogenetic analysis. Selected specimens are used for individual DNA extraction and sequencing, usually to sequence mitochondrial genomes. All remaining specimens are bulk extracted and subjected to metabarcoding. Phylogenetic analysis on the mitogenomes produces a reference tree to which short barcode sequences are added in a secondary analysis using phylogenetic placement or backbone constrainedtree searches. However, the approach may be hampered by the fact that (1) mitogenomes are limited in phylogeneticinformativeness, and (2) site-based sampling may produce poor taxon coverage and cause a suite of challenges for phylogenetic inference. To mitigate problems of phylogenetic reconstruction at deep levels, we follow a hierarchical way of gathering molecular information, where nuclear genome and mitogenome data from taxonomically chosen specimens consolidate the base and middle portion of the tree, respectively, and adding species-resolution contributed by DNA barcode data. We posit that site-based samplin

Journal article

Creedy TJ, Andújar C, Meramveliotakis E, Noguerales V, Overcast I, Papadopoulou A, Morlon H, Vogler AP, Emerson BC, Arribas Pet al., 2022, Coming of age for COI metabarcoding of whole organism community DNA: towards bioinformatic harmonisation, Molecular Ecology Resources, Vol: 22, Pages: 847-861, ISSN: 1471-8278

Metabarcoding of DNA extracted from community samples of whole organisms (whole organism community DNA, wocDNA) is increasingly being applied to terrestrial, marine and freshwater metazoan communities to provide rapid, accurate and high resolution data for novel molecular ecology research. The growth of this field has been accompanied by considerable development that builds on microbial metabarcoding methods to develop appropriate and efficient sampling and laboratory protocols for whole organism metazoan communities. However, considerably less attention has focused on ensuring bioinformatic methods are adapted and applied comprehensively in wocDNA metabarcoding. In this study we examined over 600 papers and identified 111 studies that performed COI metabarcoding of wocDNA. We then systematically reviewed the bioinformatic methods employed by these papers to identify the state-of-the-art. Our results show that the increasing use of wocDNA COI metabarcoding for metazoan diversity is characterised by a clear absence of bioinformatic harmonisation, and the temporal trends show little change in this situation. The reviewed literature showed (i) high heterogeneity across pipelines, tasks and tools used, (ii) limited or no adaptation of bioinformatic procedures to the nature of the COI fragment, and (iii) a worrying underreporting of tasks, software and parameters. Based upon these findings we propose a set of recommendations that we think the metabarcoding community should consider to ensure that bioinformatic methods are appropriate, comprehensive and comparable. We believe that adhering to these recommendations will improve the long-term integrative potential of wocDNA COI metabarcoding for biodiversity science.

Journal article

Ceballos Escalera Fernandez A, Richards J, Arias MB, Inward DJG, Vogler Aet al., 2022, Metabarcoding of insect-associated fungal communities: a comparison of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large-subunit (LSU) rRNA markers, MycoKeys, Vol: 88, Pages: 1-33, ISSN: 1314-4057

Full taxonomic characterisation of fungal communities is necessary for establishing ecological associations and early detection of pathogens and invasive species. Complex communities of fungi are regularly characterised by metabarcoding using the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and the Large-Subunit (LSU) gene of the rRNA locus, but reliance on a single short sequence fragment limits the confidence of identification. Here we link metabarcoding from the ITS2 and LSU D1-D2 regions to characterise fungal communities associated with bark beetles (Scolytinae), the likely vectors of several tree pathogens. Both markers revealed similar patterns of overall species richness and response to key variables (beetle species, forest type), but identification against the respective reference databases using various taxonomic classifiers revealed poor resolution towards lower taxonomic levels, especially the species level. Thus, Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) could not be linked via taxonomic classifiers across ITS and LSU fragments. However, using phylogenetic trees (focused on the epidemiologically important Sordariomycetes) we placed OTUs obtained with either marker relative to reference sequences of the entire rRNA cistron that includes both loci and demonstrated the largely similar phylogenetic distribution of ITS and LSU-derived OTUs. Sensitivity analysis of congruence in both markers suggested the biologically most defensible threshold values for OTU delimitation in Sordariomycetes to be 98% for ITS2 and 99% for LSU D1-D2. Studies of fungal communities using the canonical ITS barcode require corroboration across additional loci. Phylogenetic analysis of OTU sequences aligned to the full rRNA cistron shows higher success rate and greater accuracy of species identification compared to probabilistic taxonomic classifiers.

Journal article

Huang J, Miao X, Wang Q, Menzel F, Tang P, Yang D, Wu H, Vogler APet al., 2022, Metabarcoding reveals massive species diversity of Diptera in a subtropical ecosystem, Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 2045-7758

Diptera is often considered to be the richest insect group due to its great species diversity and broad ecological versatility. However, data on dipteran diversity from subtropical ecosystems have hitherto been scarce, due to the lack of studies conducted at an appropriate large scale. We investigated the diversity and composition of Diptera communities on Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang, China, using DNA metabarcoding technology, and evaluated their dynamic responses to the effects of slope aspect, season, and altitudinal zone. A total of 5,092 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were discovered and tentatively assigned to 72 dipteran families, including 2 family records new for China and 30 family records new for the locality. Cecidomyiidae, Sciaridae, and Phoridae were the predominant families, representing 53.6% of total OTUs, while 52 families include >95% unidentified and presumed undescribed species. We found that the community structure of Diptera was significantly affected by aspect, seasonality (month) and elevation, with richer diversity harbored in north-facing than south-facing slopes, and seasonality a more profound driver of community structure and diversity than elevation. Overall, massive species diversity of Diptera communities was discovered in this subtropical ecosystem of east China. The huge diversity of potentially undescribed species only revealed by metabarcoding now requires more detailed taxonomic study, as a step toward an evolutionary integration that accumulates information on species’ geographic ranges, ecological traits, functional roles, and species interactions, and thus places the local communities in the context of the growing knowledge base of global biodiversity and its response to environmental change.

Journal article

Noguerales V, Meramveliotakis E, Castro-Insua A, Andujar C, Arribas P, Creedy TJ, Overcast I, Morlon H, Emerson BC, Vogler AP, Papadopoulou Aet al., 2021, Community metabarcoding reveals the relative role of environmental filtering and spatial processes in metacommunity dynamics of soil microarthropods across a mosaic of montane forests, MOLECULAR ECOLOGY, ISSN: 0962-1083

Journal article

Motyka M, Kusy D, Hava J, Jahodarova E, Bilkova R, Vogler AP, Bocak Let al., 2021, Mitogenomic data elucidate the phylogeny and evolution of life strategies in Dermestidae (Coleoptera), SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 47, Pages: 82-93, ISSN: 0307-6970

Journal article

Huang K, Wang J, Huang J, Zhang S, Vogler AP, Liu Q, Li Y, Yang M, Li Y, Zhou Xet al., 2021, Host phylogeny and diet shape gut microbial communities within bamboo-feeding insects, Frontiers in Microbiology, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1664-302X

The gut microbiome plays an important role in a host’s development and adaption to its dietary niche. In this study, a group of bamboo-feeding insects are used to explore the potential role of the gut microbiota in the convergent adaptation to extreme diet specialization. Specifically, using a 16S rRNA marker and an Illumina sequencing platform, we profiled the microbial communities of 76 gut samples collected from nine bamboo-feeding insects, including both hemimetabolous (Orthoptera and Hemiptera) and holometabolous (Coleoptera and Lepidoptera) species, which are specialized in three distinct dietary niches: bamboo leaf, shoot, and sap. The gut microbiota of these insects were dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes and were clustered into solid (leaf and shoot) and liquid (sap) dietary niches. The gut bacterial communities of insects feeding on solid diet overlapped significantly, even though these insects belong to phylogenetically distant lineages representing different orders. In addition, the presence of cellulolytic bacterial communities within the gut microbiota allows bamboo-feeding insects to adapt to a highly specialized, fiber-rich diet. Although both phylogeny and diet can impact the structure and composition of gut microbiomes, phylogeny is the primary driving force underlying the convergent adaptation to a highly specialized diet, especially when the related insect species harbor similar gut microbiomes and share the same dietary niche over evolutionary timescales. These combined findings lay the foundation for future research on how convergent feeding strategies impact the interplays between hosts and their gut microbiomes and how the gut microbiota may facilitate convergent evolution in phylogenetically distant species in adaptation to the shared diet.

Journal article

Wei Q, Yin R, Huang J, Vogler AP, Li Y, Miao X, Kardol Pet al., 2021, The diversity of soil mesofauna declines after bamboo invasion in subtropical China, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 789, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Ge D, Feijó A, Wen Z, Abramov AV, Lu L, Cheng J, Pan S, Ye S, Xia L, Jiang X, Vogler AP, Yang Qet al., 2021, Demographic history and genomic response to environmental changes in a rapid radiation of wild rats, Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol: 38, Pages: 1905-1923, ISSN: 0737-4038

For organisms to survive and prosper in a harsh environment, particularly under rapid climate change, poses tremendous challenges. Recent studies have highlighted the continued loss of megafauna in terrestrial ecosystems and the subsequent surge of small mammals, such as rodents, bats, lagomorphs, and insectivores. However, the ecological partitioning of these animals will likely lead to large variation in their responses to environmental change. In the present study, we investigated the evolutionary history and genetic adaptations of white-bellied rats (Niviventer Marshall, 1976), which are widespread in the natural terrestrial ecosystems in Asia but also known as important zoonotic pathogen vectors and transmitters. The southeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QHTP) was inferred as the origin center of this genus, with parallel diversification in temperate and tropical niches. Demographic history analyses from mitochondrial and nuclear sequences of Niviventer demonstrated population size increases and range expansion for species in Southeast Asia, and habitat generalists elsewhere. Unexpectedly, population increases were seen in N. eha, which inhabits the highest elevation among Niviventer species. Genome scans of nuclear exons revealed that among the congeneric species, N. eha has the largest number of positively selected genes. Protein functions of these genes are mainly related to olfaction, taste and tumor suppression. Extensive genetic modification presents a major strategy in response to global changes in these alpine species.

Journal article

Arribas P, Andujar C, Bidartondo MI, Bohmann K, Coissac E, Creer S, deWaard JR, Elbrecht V, Ficetola GF, Goberna M, Kennedy S, Krehenwinkel H, Leese F, Novotny V, Ronquist F, Yu DW, Zinger L, Creedy TJ, Meramveliotakis E, Noguerales V, Overcast I, Morlon H, Vogler AP, Papadopoulou A, Emerson BCet al., 2021, Connecting high-throughput biodiversity inventories: Opportunities for a site-based genomic framework for global integration and synthesis, Molecular Ecology, Vol: 30, Pages: 1120-1135, ISSN: 0962-1083

High‐throughput sequencing (HTS) is increasingly being used for the characterization and monitoring of biodiversity. If applied in a structured way, across broad geographical scales, it offers the potential for a much deeper understanding of global biodiversity through the integration of massive quantities of molecular inventory data generated independently at local, regional and global scales. The universality, reliability and efficiency of HTS data can potentially facilitate the seamless linking of data among species assemblages from different sites, at different hierarchical levels of diversity, for any taxonomic group and regardless of prior taxonomic knowledge. However, collective international efforts are required to optimally exploit the potential of site‐based HTS data for global integration and synthesis, efforts that at present are limited to the microbial domain. To contribute to the development of an analogous strategy for the nonmicrobial terrestrial domain, an international symposium entitled “Next Generation Biodiversity Monitoring” was held in November 2019 in Nicosia (Cyprus). The symposium brought together evolutionary geneticists, ecologists and biodiversity scientists involved in diverse regional and global initiatives using HTS as a core tool for biodiversity assessment. In this review, we summarize the consensus that emerged from the 3‐day symposium. We converged on the opinion that an effective terrestrial Genomic Observatories network for global biodiversity integration and synthesis should be spatially led and strategically united under the umbrella of the metabarcoding approach. Subsequently, we outline an HTS‐based strategy to collectively build an integrative framework for site‐based biodiversity data generation.

Journal article

Andujar C, Creedy TJ, Arribas P, Lopez H, Salces-Castellano A, Perez-Delgado AJ, Vogler AP, Emerson BCet al., 2021, Validated removal of nuclear pseudogenes and sequencing artefacts from mitochondrial metabarcode data, MOLECULAR ECOLOGY RESOURCES, Vol: 21, Pages: 1772-1787, ISSN: 1755-098X

Journal article

Arribas P, Andujar C, Salces-Castellano A, Emerson BC, Vogler APet al., 2020, The limited spatial scale of dispersal in soil arthropods revealed with whole-community haplotype-level metabarcoding, MOLECULAR ECOLOGY, Vol: 30, Pages: 48-61, ISSN: 0962-1083

Journal article

Nie R, Vogler AP, Yang X-K, Lin Met al., 2020, Higher-level phylogeny of longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomeloidea) inferred from mitochondrial genomes, SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 46, Pages: 56-70, ISSN: 0307-6970

Journal article

Timmermans MJTN, Srivathsan A, Collins S, Meier R, Vogler APet al., 2020, Mimicry diversification in Papilio dardanus via a genomic inversion in the regulatory region of engrailed-invected, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 287, ISSN: 0962-8452

Journal article

Arribas P, Andujar C, Lourdes Moraza M, Linard B, Emerson BC, Vogler APet al., 2020, Mitochondrial Metagenomics Reveals the Ancient Origin and Phylodiversity of Soil Mites and Provides a Phylogeny of the Acari, MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 37, Pages: 683-694, ISSN: 0737-4038

Journal article

Creedy TJ, Norman H, Tang CQ, Chin KQ, Andujar C, Arribas P, O'Connor RS, Carvell C, Notton DG, Vogler APet al., 2020, A validated workflow for rapid taxonomic assignment and monitoring of a national fauna of bees (Apiformes) using high throughput DNA barcoding, MOLECULAR ECOLOGY RESOURCES, Vol: 20, Pages: 40-53, ISSN: 1755-098X

Journal article

Miller KE, Inward DJG, Gomez-Rodriguez C, Baselga A, Vogler APet al., 2019, Predicting the unpredictable: How host specific is the mycobiota of bark and ambrosia beetles?, FUNGAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 42, ISSN: 1754-5048

Journal article

Murria C, Sainz-Bariain M, Vogler AP, Viza A, Gonzalez M, Zamora-Munoz Cet al., 2019, Vulnerability to climate change for two endemic high-elevation, low-dispersive Annitella species (Trichoptera) in Sierra Nevada, the southernmost high mountain in Europe, INSECT CONSERVATION AND DIVERSITY, Vol: 13, Pages: 283-295, ISSN: 1752-458X

Journal article

Nie R-E, Andujar C, Gomez-Rodriguez C, Bai M, Xue H-J, Tang M, Yang C-T, Tang P, Yang X-K, Vogler APet al., 2019, The phylogeny of leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae) inferred from mitochondrial genomes, SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 45, Pages: 188-204, ISSN: 0307-6970

Journal article

Ge D, Lu L, Abramov AV, Wen Z, Cheng J, Xia L, Vogler AP, Yang Qet al., 2019, Coalescence Models Reveal the Rise of the White-Bellied Rat (Niviventer confucianus) Following the Loss of Asian Megafauna, JOURNAL OF MAMMALIAN EVOLUTION, Vol: 26, Pages: 423-434, ISSN: 1064-7554

Journal article

Nie R-E, Wei J, Zhang S-K, Vogler AP, Wu L, Konstantinov AS, Li W-Z, Yang X-K, Xue H-Jet al., 2019, Diversification of mitogenomes in three sympatric Altica flea beetles (Insecta, Chrysomelidae), ZOOLOGICA SCRIPTA, Vol: 48, Pages: 657-666, ISSN: 0300-3256

Journal article

Andujar C, Arribas P, Motyka M, Bocek M, Bocak L, Linard B, Vogler APet al., 2019, New mitochondrial genomes of 39 soil dwelling Coleoptera from metagenome sequencing, MITOCHONDRIAL DNA PART B-RESOURCES, Vol: 4, Pages: 2447-2450, ISSN: 2380-2359

Journal article

Breeschoten T, Doorenweerd C, Tarasov S, Vogler APet al., 2019, Incorporating older literature into genomic studies: A response to Zunino & Halffter, MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 133, Pages: 164-165, ISSN: 1055-7903

Journal article

Creedy TJ, Ng WS, Vogler A, 2019, Towards accurate species-level metabarcoding of arthropod communities from the tropical forest canopy, Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 6, Pages: 3105-3116, ISSN: 2045-7758

Metabarcoding of arthropod communities can be used for assessing species diversity in tropical forests but the methodology requires validation for accurate and repeatable species occurrences in complex mixtures. This study investigates how the composition of ecological samples affects the accuracy of species recovery. Starting with field-collected bulk samples from the tropical canopy, the recovery of specimens was tested for subsets of different body sizes and major taxa, by assembling these subsets into increasingly complex composite pools. After metabarcoding, we track whether richness, diversity and most importantly composition of any size class or taxonomic subset is affected by the presence of other subsets in the mixture.Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) greatly exceeded the number of morphospecies in most taxa, even under very stringent sequencing read filtering. There was no significant effect on the recovered OTU richness of small and medium-sized arthropods when metabarcoded alongside larger arthropods, despite substantial biomass differences in the mixture. The recovery of taxonomic subsets was not generally influenced by the presence of other taxa, although with some exceptions likely due to primer mismatches. Considerable compositional variation within size and taxon-based subcommunities were evident resulting in high beta diversity among samples from within a single tree canopy, but this beta diversity was not affected by experimental manipulation.We conclude that OTU recovery in complex arthropod communities, with sufficient sequencing depth and within reasonable size ranges, is not skewed by variable biomass of the constituent species. This could remove the need for time-intensive manual sorting prior to metabarcoding. However, there remains a chance of taxonomic bias, which may be primer-dependent. There will never be a panacea primer; instead, metabarcoding studies should carefully consider whether the aim is broad-scale turnover, in which case t

Journal article

Tang P, Zhu J-C, Zheng B-Y, Wei S-J, Sharkey M, Chen X-X, Vogler APet al., 2019, Mitochondrial phylogenomics of the Hymenoptera, MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 131, Pages: 8-18, ISSN: 1055-7903

Journal article

Kusy D, Motyka M, Bocek M, Vogler AP, Bocak Let al., 2018, Genome sequences identify three families of Coleoptera as morphologically derived click beetles (Elateridae), Scientific Reports, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2045-2322

Plastoceridae Crowson, 1972, Drilidae Blanchard, 1845 and Omalisidae Lacordaire, 1857 (Elateroidea) are families of the Coleoptera with obscure phylogenetic relationships and modified morphology showing neotenic traits such as soft bodies, reduced wing cases and larviform females. We shotgun sequenced genomes of Plastocerus, Drilus and Omalisus and incorporated them into data matrices of 66 and 4202 single-copy nuclear genes representing Elateroidea. Phylogenetic analyses indicate their terminal positions within the broadly defined well-sclerotized and fully metamorphosed Elateridae and thus Omalisidae should now be considered as Omalisinae stat. nov. in Elateridae Leach, 1815. The results support multiple independent origins of incomplete metamorphosis in Elateridae and indicate the parallel evolution of morphological and ecological traits. Unlike other neotenic elateroids derived from the supposedly pre-adapted aposematically coloured and unpalatable soft-bodied elateroids, such as fireflies (Lampyridae) and net-winged beetles (Lycidae), omalisids and drilids evolved from well-sclerotized click beetles. These findings suggest sudden morphological shifts through incomplete metamorphosis, with important implications for macroevolution, including reduced speciation rate and high extinction risk in unstable habitats. Precise phylogenetic placement is necessary for studies of the molecular mechanisms of ontogenetic shifts leading to profoundly changed morphology.

Journal article

Linard B, Crampton-Platt A, Moriniere J, Timmermans MJTN, Andujar C, Arribas P, Miller KE, Lipecki J, Favreau E, Hunter A, Gomez-Rodriguez C, Barton C, Nie R, Gillett CPDT, Breeschoten T, Bocak L, Vogler APet al., 2018, The contribution of mitochondrial metagenomics to large-scale data mining and phylogenetic analysis of Coleoptera, MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 128, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1055-7903

Journal article

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