Imperial College London

DrAlasdairScott

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Lecturer
 
 
 
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alasdair.scott03 Website CV

 
 
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Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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52 results found

Beatty JW, Clarke JM, Sounderajah V, Acharya A, Rabinowicz S, Martin G, Warren LR, Yalamanchili S, Scott AJ, Burgnon E, Purkayastha S, Markar S, Kinross JM, PANSURG-PREDICT Collaborativeet al., 2021, Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emergency adult surgical patients and surgical services: an international multi-center cohort study and department survey., Annals of Surgery, ISSN: 0003-4932

OBJECTIVES: The PREDICT study aimed to determine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected surgical services and surgical patients and to identify predictors of outcomes in this cohort. BACKGROUND: High mortality rates were reported for surgical patients with COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic. However, the indirect impact of the pandemic on this cohort is not understood, and risk predictors are yet to be identified. METHODS: PREDICT is an international longitudinal cohort study comprising surgical patients presenting to hospital between March and August 2020, conducted alongside a survey of staff redeployment and departmental restructuring. A subgroup analysis of 3176 adult emergency patients, recruited by 55 teams across 18 countries is presented. RESULTS: Among adult emergency surgical patients, all-cause in-hospital mortality (IHM) was 3 6%, compared to 15 5% for those with COVID-19. However, only 14 1% received a COVID-19 test on admission in March, increasing to 76 5% by July.Higher Clinical Frailty Scale scores (CFS >7 aOR 18 87), ASA grade above 2 (aOR 4 29), and COVID-19 infection (aOR 5 12) were independently associated with significantly increased IHM.The peak months of the first wave were independently associated with significantly higher IHM (March aOR 4 34; April aOR 4 25; May aOR 3 97), compared to non-peak months.During the study, UK operating theatre capacity decreased by a mean of 63 6% with a concomitant 27 3% reduction in surgical staffing. CONCLUSION: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted surgical patients, both directly through co-morbid infection and indirectly as shown by increasing mortality in peak months, irrespective of COVID-19 status.Higher CFS scores and ASA grades strongly predict outcomes in surgical patients and are an important risk assessment tool during the pandemic.

Journal article

Van Den Heede K, Chidambaram S, Winter Beatty J, Chander N, Markar S, Tolley NS, Palazzo FF, Kinross JK, Di Marco AN, PanSurg Collaborative and the PREDICT-Endocrine Collaborativeet al., 2021, The PanSurg-PREDICT Study: endocrine surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic, World Journal of Surgery, Vol: 45, Pages: 2315-2324, ISSN: 0364-2313

BACKGROUND: In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, patients have continued to present with endocrine (surgical) pathology in an environment depleted of resources. This study investigated how the pandemic affected endocrine surgery practice. METHODS: PanSurg-PREDICT is an international, multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study of emergency and elective surgical patients in secondary/tertiary care during the pandemic. PREDICT-Endocrine collected endocrine-specific data alongside demographics, COVID-19 and outcome data from 11-3-2020 to 13-9-2020. RESULTS: A total of 380 endocrine surgery patients (19 centres, 12 countries) were analysed (224 thyroidectomies, 116 parathyroidectomies, 40 adrenalectomies). Ninety-seven percent were elective, and 63% needed surgery within 4 weeks. Eight percent were initially deferred but had surgery during the pandemic; less than 1% percent was deferred for more than 6 months. Decision-making was affected by capacity, COVID-19 status or the pandemic in 17%, 5% and 7% of cases. Indication was cancer/worrying lesion in 61% of thyroidectomies and 73% of adrenalectomies and calcium 2.80 mmol/l or greater in 50% of parathyroidectomies. COVID-19 status was unknown at presentation in 92% and remained unknown before surgery in 30%. Two-thirds were asked to self-isolate before surgery. There was one COVID-19-related ICU admission and no mortalities. Consultant-delivered care occurred in a majority (anaesthetist 96%, primary surgeon 76%). Post-operative vocal cord check was reported in only 14% of neck endocrine operations. Both of these observations are likely to reflect modification of practice due to the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected endocrine surgical decision-making, case mix and personnel delivering care. Significant variation was seen in COVID-19 risk mitigation measures. COVID-19-related complications were uncommon. This analysis demonstrates the safety of endocrine surgery during this

Journal article

Van den Heede K, Chidambaram S, Beatty JW, Chander N, Markar S, Tolley NS, Palazzo FF, Kinross JK, Di Marco ANet al., 2021, The PanSurg-PREDICT study: endocrine surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic (Apr, 10.1007/s00268-021-06099-z, 2021), World Journal of Surgery, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 0364-2313

Journal article

Denning M, Goh ET, Tan B, Kanneganti A, Almonte M, Scott A, Martin G, Clarke J, Sounderajah V, Markar S, Przybylowicz J, Chan YH, Sia C-H, Chua YX, Sim K, Lim L, Tan L, Tan M, Sharma V, Ooi S, Beatty JW, Flott K, Mason S, Chidambaram S, Yalamanchili S, Zbikowska G, Fedorowski J, Dykowska G, Wells M, Purkayastha S, Kinross Jet al., 2021, Determinants of burnout and other aspects of psychological well-being in healthcare workers during the Covid-19 pandemic: A multinational cross-sectional study, PLOS ONE, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

St John ER, Bakri AC, Johanson E, Loughran D, Scott A, Chen ST, Joshi S, Darzi A, Leff DRet al., 2021, Assessment of the introduction of semi-digital consent into surgical practice, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 108, Pages: 342-345, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Mason SE, Scott AJ, Markar SR, Clarke JM, Martin G, Winter Beatty J, Sounderajah V, Yalamanchili S, Denning M, Arulampalam T, Kinross JMet al., 2020, Insights from a global snapshot of the change in elective colorectal practice due to the COVID-19 pandemic, PLoS One, Vol: 15, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1932-6203

BackgroundThere is a need to understand the impact of COVID-19 on colorectal cancer care globally and determine drivers of variation.ObjectiveTo evaluate COVID-19 impact on colorectal cancer services globally and identify predictors for behaviour change.DesignAn online survey of colorectal cancer service change globally in May and June 2020.ParticipantsAttending or consultant surgeons involved in the care of patients with colorectal cancer.Main outcome measuresChanges in the delivery of diagnostics (diagnostic endoscopy), imaging for staging, therapeutics and surgical technique in the management of colorectal cancer. Predictors of change included increased hospital bed stress, critical care bed stress, mortality and world region.Results191 responses were included from surgeons in 159 centers across 46 countries, demonstrating widespread service reduction with global variation. Diagnostic endoscopy was reduced in 93% of responses, even with low hospital stress and mortality; whilst rising critical care bed stress triggered complete cessation (p = 0.02). Availability of CT and MRI fell by 40–41%, with MRI significantly reduced with high hospital stress. Neoadjuvant therapy use in rectal cancer changed in 48% of responses, where centers which had ceased surgery increased its use (62 vs 30%, p = 0.04) as did those with extended delays to surgery (p<0.001). High hospital and critical care bed stresses were associated with surgeons forming more stomas (p<0.04), using more experienced operators (p<0.003) and decreased laparoscopy use (critical care bed stress only, p<0.001). Patients were also more actively prioritized for resection, with increased importance of co-morbidities and ICU need.ConclusionsThe COVID-19 pandemic was associated with severe restrictions in the availability of colorectal cancer services on a global scale, with significant variation in behaviours which cannot be fully accounted for by hospital burden or mortality.

Journal article

Denning M, Goh ET, Scott A, Martin G, Markar S, Flott K, Mason S, Przybylowicz J, Almonte M, Clarke J, Winter Beatty J, Chidambaram S, Yalamanchili S, Yong-Qiang Tan B, Kanneganti A, Sounderajah V, Wells M, Purkayastha S, Kinross Jet al., 2020, What has been the impact of Covid-19 on Safety Culture? A case study from a large metropolitan teaching hospital, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol: 17, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 1660-4601

Covid-19 has placed an unprecedented demand on healthcare systems worldwide. A positive safety culture is associated with improved patient safety and in turn patient outcomes. To date, no study has evaluated the impact of Covid-19 on safety culture. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was used to investigate safety culture at a large UK healthcare trust during Covid-19. Findings were compared with baseline data from 2017. Incident reporting from the year preceding the pandemic was also examined. SAQ scores of doctors and 'other clinical staff', were relatively higher than the nursing group. During Covid-19, on univariate regression analysis, female gender, age 40-49 years, non-white ethnicity, and nursing job role were all associated with lower SAQ scores. Training and support for redeployment were associated with higher SAQ scores. On multivariate analysis, non-disclosed gender (-0.13), non-disclosed ethnicity (-0.11), nursing role (-0.15), and support (0.29) persisted to significance. A significant decrease (p<0.003) was seen in error reporting after the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. This is the first study to investigate SAQ during Covid-19. Differences in SAQ scores were observed during Covid-19 between professional groups when compared to baseline. Reductions in incident reporting were also seen. These changes may reflect perception of risk, changes in volume or nature of work. High-quality support for redeployed staff may be associated with improved safety perception during future pandemics.

Journal article

Markar SR, Martin G, Penna M, Yalamanchili S, Beatty JW, Clarke J, Erridge S, Sounderajah V, Denning M, Scott A, Purkayastha S, Kinross J, PanSurg Collaborative groupet al., 2020, Changing the paradigm of surgical research during a pandemic, Annals of Surgery, Vol: 272, Pages: e170-e171, ISSN: 0003-4932

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a paradigm shift in how we manage surgical patients. Assuch, there is an immediate need to adapt the traditional model of surgical research in order tocreate pragmatic studies with adaptive designs in order to rapidly disseminate key knowledgeamongst the global surgical community.

Journal article

Scott A, Tan BYQ, Huak CY, Sia C-H, Xian CY, Goh ET, Zbikowska G, Dykowska G, Martin G, Kinross J, Przybylowicz J, Fedorowski J, Beatty JW, Clarke J, Sim K, Abhiram K, Flott K, Lim LJH, Wells M, Denning M, Almonte MT, Tan M, Mason S, Purkayastha S, Yalamanchili S, Markar S, Ooi SBS, Chidambaran S, Lifeng T, Sharma VK, Sounderajah Vet al., 2020, Determinants of Burnout and Other Aspects of Psychological Well-Being in Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Multinational Cross-Sectional Study

<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>The Covid-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented pressure on healthcare systems and workers around the world. Such pressures may impact on working conditions, psychological wellbeing and perception of safety. In spite of this, no study has assessed the relationship between safety attitudes and psychological outcomes. Moreover, only limited studies have examined the relationship between personal characteristics and psychological outcomes during Covid-19.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>From 22nd March 2020 to 18th June 2020, healthcare workers from the United Kingdom, Poland, and Singapore were invited to participate using a self-administered questionnaire comprising the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate safety culture, burnout and anxiety/depression. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of burnout, anxiety and depression.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Of 3,537 healthcare workers who participated in the study, 2,364 (67%) screened positive for burnout, 701 (20%) for anxiety, and 389 (11%) for depression. Significant predictors of burnout included patient-facing roles: doctor (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.49-2.95), nurse (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.04-1.84), and ‘other clinical’ (OR 2.02; 95% CI 1.45-2.82); being redeployed (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.02-1.58), bottom quartile SAQ score (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.98-2.99), anxiety (OR 4.87; 95% CI 3.92-6.06) and depression (OR 4.06; 95% CI 3.04-5.42). Factors significantly protective for burnout included being tested for SARS-CoV-2 (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.51-0.82) and top quartile SAQ score (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.22-0.40). Significant factors associated with anx

Journal article

Denning M, Goh ET, Scott A, Martin G, Markar S, Flott K, Mason S, Przybylowicz J, Almonte M, Clarke J, Winter-Beatty J, Chidambaram S, Yalamanchili S, Tan BY-Q, Kanneganti A, Sounderajah V, Wells M, Purkayastha S, Kinross Jet al., 2020, What has been the impact of Covid-19 on Safety Culture? A case study from a large metropolitan teaching hospital

<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Introduction</jats:title><jats:p>Covid-19 has placed an unprecedented demand on healthcare systems worldwide. A positive safety culture is associated with improved patient safety and in turn patient outcomes. To date, no study has evaluated the impact of Covid-19 on safety culture.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was used to investigate safety culture at a large UK teaching hospital during Covid-19. Findings were compared with baseline data from 2017. Incident reporting from the year preceding the pandemic was also examined.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Significant increased were seen in SAQ scores of doctors and ‘other clinical staff’, there was no change in the nursing group. During Covid-19, on univariate regression analysis, female gender, age 40-49 years, non-white ethnicity, and nursing job role were all associated with lower SAQ scores. Training and support for redeployment were associated with higher SAQ scores. On multivariate analysis, non-disclosed gender (−0.13), non-disclosed ethnicity (−0.11), nursing role (−0.15), and support (0.29) persisted to significance. A significant decrease (p&lt;0.003) was seen in error reporting after the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Discussion</jats:title><jats:p>This is the first study to report SAQ during Covid-19 and compare with baseline. Differences in SAQ scores were observed during Covid-19 between professional groups and compared to baseline. Reductions in incident reporting were also seen. These changes may reflect perception of risk, changes in volume or nature of work. High-quality support for redeployed staff may be associat

Journal article

Scott AJ, Alexander JL, Merrifield CA, Cunningham D, Jobin C, Brown R, Alverdy J, O'Keefe SJ, Gaskins HR, Teare J, Yu J, Hughes DJ, Verstraelen H, Burton J, O'Toole PW, Rosenberg DW, Marchesi JR, Kinross JMet al., 2019, International Cancer Microbiome Consortium consensus statement on the role of the human microbiome in carcinogenesis, Gut, Vol: 68, Pages: 1624-1632, ISSN: 0017-5749

Objective In this consensus statement, an international panel of experts deliver their opinions on key questions regarding the contribution of the human microbiome to carcinogenesis.Design International experts in oncology and/or microbiome research were approached by personal communication to form a panel. A structured, iterative, methodology based around a 1-day roundtable discussion was employed to derive expert consensus on key questions in microbiome-oncology research.Results Some 18 experts convened for the roundtable discussion and five key questions were identified regarding: (1) the relevance of dysbiosis/an altered gut microbiome to carcinogenesis; (2) potential mechanisms of microbiota-induced carcinogenesis; (3) conceptual frameworks describing how the human microbiome may drive carcinogenesis; (4) causation versus association; and (5) future directions for research in the field.The panel considered that, despite mechanistic and supporting evidence from animal and human studies, there is currently no direct evidence that the human commensal microbiome is a key determinant in the aetiopathogenesis of cancer. The panel cited the lack of large longitudinal, cohort studies as a principal deciding factor and agreed that this should be a future research priority. However, while acknowledging gaps in the evidence, expert opinion was that the microbiome, alongside environmental factors and an epigenetically/genetically vulnerable host, represents one apex of a tripartite, multidirectional interactome that drives carcinogenesis.Conclusion Data from longitudinal cohort studies are needed to confirm the role of the human microbiome as a key driver in the aetiopathogenesis of cancer.

Journal article

International Surgical Outcomes Study ISOS group, 2019, Prospective observational cohort study on grading the severity of postoperative complications in global surgery research., Br J Surg, Vol: 106, Pages: e73-e80

BACKGROUND: The Clavien-Dindo classification is perhaps the most widely used approach for reporting postoperative complications in clinical trials. This system classifies complication severity by the treatment provided. However, it is unclear whether the Clavien-Dindo system can be used internationally in studies across differing healthcare systems in high- (HICs) and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of the International Surgical Outcomes Study (ISOS), a prospective observational cohort study of elective surgery in adults. Data collection occurred over a 7-day period. Severity of complications was graded using Clavien-Dindo and the simpler ISOS grading (mild, moderate or severe, based on guided investigator judgement). Severity grading was compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Data are presented as frequencies and ICC values (with 95 per cent c.i.). The analysis was stratified by income status of the country, comparing HICs with LMICs. RESULTS: A total of 44 814 patients were recruited from 474 hospitals in 27 countries (19 HICs and 8 LMICs). Some 7508 patients (16·8 per cent) experienced at least one postoperative complication, equivalent to 11 664 complications in total. Using the ISOS classification, 5504 of 11 664 complications (47·2 per cent) were graded as mild, 4244 (36·4 per cent) as moderate and 1916 (16·4 per cent) as severe. Using Clavien-Dindo, 6781 of 11 664 complications (58·1 per cent) were graded as I or II, 1740 (14·9 per cent) as III, 2408 (20·6 per cent) as IV and 735 (6·3 per cent) as V. Agreement between classification systems was poor overall (ICC 0·41, 95 per cent c.i. 0·20 to 0·55), and in LMICs (ICC 0·23, 0·05 to 0·38) and HICs (ICC 0·46, 0·25 to 0·59). CONCLUSION: Caution is recommended when using a treatment approach to grade complications in global sur

Journal article

Scott AJ, Mason SE, Langdon AJ, Patel B, Mayer E, Moorthy K, Purkayastha Set al., 2018, Prospective risk factor analysis for the development of post-operative Urinary retention following ambulatory general surgery, World Journal of Surgery, Vol: 42, Pages: 3874-3879, ISSN: 1432-2323

AimsPost-operative urinary retention (POUR) is a common cause of unplanned admission following day-case surgery and has negative effects on both patient and surgical institution. We aimed to prospectively evaluate potential risk factors for the development of POUR following day-case general surgical procedures.MethodsOver a 24-week period, consecutive adult patients undergoing elective day-case general surgery at a single institution were prospectively recruited. Data regarding urinary symptoms, comorbidities, drug history, surgery and perioperative anaesthetic drug use were collected. The primary outcome was the incidence of POUR, defined as an impairment of bladder voiding requiring either urethral catheterisation, unplanned overnight admission or both. Potential risk factors for the development of POUR were analysed by logistic regression.ResultsA total of 458 patients met the inclusion criteria during the study period, and data were collected on 382 (83%) patients (74.3% male). Sixteen patients (4.2%) experienced POUR. Unadjusted analysis demonstrated three significant risk factors for the development of POUR: age ≥ 56 years (OR 7.77 [2.18–27.78], p = 0.002), laparoscopic surgery (OR 3.37 [1.03–12.10], p = 0.044) and glycopyrrolate administration (OR 5.56 [2.00–15.46], p = 0.001). Male sex and lower urinary tract symptoms were not significant factors. Multivariate analysis combining type of surgery, age and glycopyrrolate use revealed that only age ≥ 56 years (OR 8.14 [2.18–30.32], p = 0.0018) and glycopyrrolate administration (OR 3.48 [1.08–11.24], p = 0.0370) were independently associated with POUR.ConclusionsPatients aged at least 56 years and/or requiring glycopyrrolate—often administered during laparoscopic procedures—are at increased risk of POUR following ambulatory general surgery.

Journal article

Scott AJ, Merrifield CA, Younes JA, Pekelharing EPet al., 2018, Pre-, pro- and synbiotics in cancer prevention and treatment-a review of basic and clinical research, Ecancermedicalscience, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1754-6605

There is a growing appreciation of the role of the human microbiota in the pathophysiology of cancer. Pre-, pro- and synbiotics are some of the best evidenced means of manipulating the microbiota for therapeutic benefit and their potential role in the prevention and treatment of cancer has garnered significant interest. In this review, we discuss how these agents may have oncosuppressive effects by maintaining intestinal barrier function, immunomodulation, metabolism and preventing host cell proliferation. We highlight the epidemiological and trials-based evidence supporting a role for pre-, pro- and synbiotics in the prevention of cancer. Ultimately, there is more evidence in support of these agents as adjuncts in the treatment of cancer. We discuss their roles in optimising the efficacy and/or minimising the adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, antibiotics and surgery. Although we see significant promise in the application of pre-, pro- and synbiotics for clinical benefit in oncology patients, the field is very much in its infancy and oncologists face substantial challenges in advising their patients appropriately.

Journal article

Alexander JL, Scott AJ, Pouncey AL, Marchesi J, Kinross J, Teare Jet al., 2018, Colorectal carcinogenesis: an archetype of gut microbiota-host interaction, Ecancermedicalscience, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1754-6605

Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major cause of worldwide mortality. Epidemiological evidence of markedly increased risk in populations that migrate to Western countries, or adopt their lifestyle, suggests that CRC is a disease whose aetiology is defined primarily by interactions between the host and his environment. The gut microbiome sits directly at this interface and is now increasingly recognised as a modulator of colorectal carcinogenesis. Bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Escherichia coli (E. Coli) are found in abundance in patients with CRC and have been shown in experimental studies to promote neoplasia. A whole armamentarium of bacteria-derived oncogenic mechanisms has been defined, including the subversion of apoptosis and the production of genotoxins and pro-inflammatory factors. But the microbiota may also be protective: for example, they are implicated in the metabolism of dietary fibre to produce butyrate, a short chain fatty acid, which is anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic. Indeed, although our understanding of this immensely complex, highly individualised and multi-faceted relationship is expanding rapidly, many questions remain: Can we define friends and foes, and drivers and passengers? What are the critical functions of the microbiota in the context of colorectal neoplasia?

Journal article

Pouncey AL, Scott AJ, Alexander JL, Marchesi J, Kinross Jet al., 2018, Gut microbiota, chemotherapy and the host: the influence of the gut microbiota on cancer treatment, Ecancermedicalscience, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1754-6605

The gut microbiota exists in a dynamic balance between symbiosis and pathogenesis and can influence almost any aspect of host physiology. Growing evidence suggests that the gut microbiota not only plays a key role in carcinogenesis but also influences the efficacy and toxicity of anticancer therapy. The microbiota modulates the host response to chemotherapy via numerous mechanisms, including immunomodulation, xenometabolism and alteration of community structure. Furthermore, exploitation of the microbiota offers opportunities for the personalisation of chemotherapeutic regimens and the development of novel therapies. In this article, we explore the host-chemotherapeutic microbiota axis, from basic science to clinical research, and describe how it may change the face of cancer treatment.

Journal article

Mason S, Alexander JL, White E, Bodai Z, Manoli E, Paizs P, Scott A, Adebesin A, Hoare J, Goldin R, Darzi A, Takats Z, Kinross JMet al., 2018, PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL COHORT STUDY OF RAPID IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY (REIMS) FOR NEAR-REAL TIME DIAGNOSIS AND STRATIFICATION OF COLORECTAL CANCER, Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for-Gastrointestinal-Endoscopy / Digestive Disease Week, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S277-S278, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Alexander JL, Scott A, Poynter LR, McDonald JA, von Roon AC, Marchesi J, Kinross JM, Teare JPet al., 2018, THE EFFECT OF BOWEL PURGATIVE MEDICATION ON THE MUCOSA-ASSOCIATED MICROBIOTA MAY BE LESS SIGNIFICANT THAN WE THOUGHT, Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for-Gastrointestinal-Endoscopy / Digestive Disease Week, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S1044-S1045, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Alexander JL, Scott A, Poynter LR, McDonald JA, Cameron S, Inglese P, Doria L, Kral J, Hughes DJ, Susova S, Liska V, Soucek P, Hoyles L, Gomez-Romero M, Nicholson JK, Takats Z, Marchesi J, Kinross JM, Teare JPet al., 2018, THE COLORECTAL CANCER MUCOSAL MICROBIOME IS DEFINED BY DISEASE STAGE AND THE TUMOUR METABONOME, Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for-Gastrointestinal-Endoscopy / Digestive Disease Week, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S415-S415, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Alexander JL, Scott A, Poynter LR, McDonald JA, Cameron S, Inglese P, Doria L, Kral J, Hughes DJ, Susova S, Liska V, Soucek P, Hoyles L, Gomez-Romero M, Nicholson JK, Takats Z, Marchesi J, Kinross JM, Teare JPet al., 2018, Sa1840 - The colorectal cancer mucosal microbiome is defined by disease stage and the tumour metabonome, Digestive Disease Week 2018, Publisher: Elsevier, Pages: S415-S415, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Scott AJ, Merrifield CA, Alexander JL, Marchesi JR, Kinross JMet al., 2017, Highlights from the Inaugural International Cancer Microbiome Consortium Meeting (ICMC), 5-6 September 2017, London, UK, Ecancermedicalscience, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1754-6605

The International Cancer Microbiome Consortium (ICMC) is a recently launched collaborative between academics and academic-clinicians that aims to promote microbiome research within the field of oncology, establish expert consensus and deliver education for academics and clinicians. The inaugural two-day meeting was held at the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM), London, UK, 5–6 September 2017. Microbiome and cancer experts from around the world first delivered a series of talks during an educational day and then sat for a day of roundtable discussion to debate key topics in microbiome-cancer research.Talks delivered during the educational day covered a broad range of microbiome-related topics. The potential role of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer was discussed and debated in detail with experts highlighting the latest data in animal models and humans and addressing the question of causation versus association. The impact of the microbiota on other cancers—such as lung and urogenital tract—was also discussed. The microbiome represents a novel target for therapeutic manipulation in cancer and a number of talks explored how this might be realised through diet, faecal microbiota transplant and chemotherapeutics.On the second day, experts debated pre-agreed topics with the aim of producing a consensus statement with a focus on the current state of our knowledge and key gaps for further development. The panel debated the notion of a ‘healthy’ microbiome and, in turn, the concept of dysbiosis in cancer. The mechanisms of microbiota-induced carcinogenesis were discussed in detail and our current conceptual models were assessed. Experts also considered co-factors in microbiome-induced carcinogenesis to conclude that the tripartite ‘interactome’ between genetically vulnerable host, environment and the microbiome is central to our current understanding. To conclude, the roundtable discussed how the microbiome may b

Journal article

Ahmad T, Bouwman RA, Grigoras I, Aldecoa C, Hofer C, Hoeft A, Holt P, Fleisher LA, Buhre W, Pearse RM, Ferguson M, MacMahon M, Shulman M, Cherian R, Currow H, Kanathiban K, Gillespie D, Pathmanathan E, Phillips K, Reynolds J, Rowley J, Douglas J, Kerridge R, Garg S, Bennett M, Jain M, Alcock D, Terblanche N, Cotter R, Leslie K, Stewart M, Zingerle N, Clyde A, Hambidge O, Rehak A, Cotterell S, Huynh WBQ, McCulloch T, Ben-Menachem E, Egan T, Cope J, Halliwell R, Fellinger P, Haisjackl M, Haselberger S, Holaubek C, Lichtenegger P, Scherz F, Schmid W, Hoffer F, Cakova V, Eichwalder A, Fischbach N, Klug R, Schneider E, Vesely M, Wickenhauser R, Grubmueller KG, Leitgeb M, Lang F, Toro N, Bauer M, Laengle F, Haberl C, Mayrhofer T, Trybus C, Buerkle C, Forstner K, Germann R, Rinoesl H, Schindler E, Trampitsch E, Bogner G, Dankl D, Duenser M, Fritsch G, Gradwohl-Matis I, Hartmann A, Hoelzenbein T, Jaeger T, Landauer F, Lindl G, Lux M, Steindl J, Stundner O, Szabo C, Bidgoli J, Verdoodt H, Forget P, Kahn D, Lois F, Momeni M, Pregardien C, Pospiech A, Steyaert A, Veevaete L, De Kegel D, De Jongh K, Foubert L, Smitz C, Vercauteren M, Poelaert J, Van Mossevelde V, Abeloos J, Bouchez S, Coppens M, De Baerdemaeker L, Deblaere I, De Bruyne A, De Hert S, Fonck K, Heyse B, Jacobs T, Lapage K, Moerman A, Neckebroek M, Parashchanka A, Roels N, Van Den Eynde N, Vandenheuvel M, Van Limmen J, Vanluchene A, Vanpeteghem C, Wouters P, Wyffels P, Huygens C, Vandenbempt P, Van de Velde M, Dylst D, Janssen B, Schreurs E, Aleixo FB, Candido K, Batista HD, Guimaraes M, Guizeline J, Hoffmann J, Lobo S, Marques Lobo FR, Nascimento V, Nishiyama K, Pazetto L, Souza D, Rodrigues RS, Vilela dos Santos AM, Jardim J, Sa Malbouisson LM, Silva J, do Nascimento Junior P, Baio TH, Pereira de Castro GI, Watanabe Oliveira HR, Amendola CP, Cardoso G, Ortega D, Brotto AF, De Oliveira MC, Rea-Neto A, Dias F, Travi ME, Zerman L, Azambuja P, Knibel MF, Martins A, Almeida W, Neder Neto C, Tardelli MA, Caser E, Machaet al., 2017, In-hospital clinical outcomes after upper gastrointestinal surgery: Data from an international observational study, EJSO, Vol: 43, Pages: 2324-2332, ISSN: 0748-7983

Journal article

Kinross J, Mirnezami R, Alexander J, Brown R, Scott A, Galea D, Veselkov K, Goldin R, Darzi A, Nicholson J, Marchesi JRet al., 2017, A prospective analysis of mucosal microbiome-metabonome interactions in colorectal cancer using a combined MAS 1HNMR and metataxonomic strategy, Scientific Reports, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2045-2322

Colon cancer induces a state of mucosal dysbiosis with associated niche specific changes in the gut microbiota. However, the key metabolic functions of these bacteria remain unclear. We performed a prospective observational study in patients undergoing elective surgery for colon cancer without mechanical bowel preparation (n = 18). Using 16 S rRNA gene sequencing we demonstrated that microbiota ecology appears to be cancer stage-specific and strongly associated with histological features of poor prognosis. Fusobacteria (p < 0.007) and ε- Proteobacteria (p < 0.01) were enriched on tumour when compared to adjacent normal mucosal tissue, and fusobacteria and β-Proteobacteria levels increased with advancing cancer stage (p = 0.014 and 0.002 respecitvely). Metabonomic analysis using 1H Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonsance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy, demonstrated increased abundance of taurine, isoglutamine, choline, lactate, phenylalanine and tyrosine and decreased levels of lipids and triglycerides in tumour relative to adjacent healthy tissue. Network analysis revealed that bacteria associated with poor prognostic features were not responsible for the modification of the cancer mucosal metabonome. Thus the colon cancer mucosal microbiome evolves with cancer stage to meet the demands of cancer metabolism. Passenger microbiota may play a role in the maintenance of cancer mucosal metabolic homeostasis but these metabolic functions may not be stage specific.

Journal article

Ahmad T, Bouwman RA, Grigoras I, Aldecoa C, Hofer C, Hoeft A, Holt P, Fleisher LA, Buhre W, Pearse RM, Ferguson M, MacMahon M, Shulman M, Cherian R, Currow H, Kanathiban K, Gillespie D, Pathmanathan E, Phillips K, Reynolds J, Rowley J, Douglas J, Kerridge R, Garg S, Bennett M, Jain M, Alcock D, Terblanche N, Cotter R, Leslie K, Stewart M, Zingerle N, Clyde A, Hambidge O, Rehak A, Cotterell S, Huynh WBQ, McCulloch T, Ben-Menachem E, Egan T, Cope J, Halliwell R, Fellinger P, Haisjackl M, Haselberger S, Holaubek C, Lichtenegger P, Scherz F, Schmid W, Hoffer F, Cakova V, Eichwalder A, Fischbach N, Klug R, Schneider E, Vesely M, Wickenhauser R, Grubmueller KG, Leitgeb M, Lang F, Toro N, Bauer M, Laengle F, Haberl C, Mayrhofer T, Trybus C, Buerkle C, Forstner K, Germann R, Rinoesl H, Schindler E, Trampitsch E, Bogner G, Dankl D, Duenser M, Fritsch G, Gradwohl-Matis I, Hartmann A, Hoelzenbein T, Jaeger T, Landauer F, Lindl G, Lux M, Steindl J, Stundner O, Szabo C, Bidgoli J, Verdoodt H, Forget P, Kahn D, Lois F, Momeni M, Pregardien C, Pospiech A, Steyaert A, Veevaete L, De Kegel D, De Jongh K, Foubert L, Smitz C, Vercauteren M, Poelaert J, Van Mossevelde V, Abeloos J, Bouchez S, Coppens M, De Baerdemaeker L, Deblaere I, De Bruyne A, De Hert S, Fonck K, Heyse B, Jacobs T, Lapage K, Moerman A, Neckebroek M, Parashchanka A, Roels N, Van Den Eynde N, Vandenheuvel M, Van Limmen J, Vanluchene A, Vanpeteghem C, Wouters P, Wyffels P, Huygens C, Vandenbempt P, Van de Velde M, Dylst D, Janssen B, Schreurs E, Aleixo FB, Candido K, Batista HD, Guimaraes M, Guizeline J, Hoffmann J, Lobo S, Marques Lobo FR, Nascimento V, Nishiyama K, Pazetto L, Souza D, Rodrigues RS, Vilela dos Santos AM, Jardim J, Sa Malbouisson LM, Silva J, do Nascimento Junior P, Baio TH, Pereira de Castro GI, Watanabe Oliveira HR, Amendola CP, Cardoso G, Ortega D, Brotto AF, De Oliveira MC, Rea-Neto A, Dias F, Travi ME, Zerman L, Azambuja P, Knibel MF, Martins A, Almeida W, Neder Neto C, Tardelli MA, Caser E, Machaet al., 2017, Use of failure-to-rescue to identify international variation in postoperative care in low-, middle- and high-income countries: a 7-day cohort study of elective surgery, BRITISH JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIA, Vol: 119, Pages: 258-266, ISSN: 0007-0912

Journal article

St John ER, Scott AJ, Irvine TE, Pakzad F, Leff DR, Layer GTet al., 2017, Completion of hand-written surgical consent forms is frequently suboptimal and could be improved by using electronically generated, procedure-specific forms, SURGEON-JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL COLLEGES OF SURGEONS OF EDINBURGH AND IRELAND, Vol: 15, Pages: 190-195, ISSN: 1479-666X

Journal article

Maurice JB, Patel A, Scott AJ, Patel K, Thursz M, Lemoine Met al., 2017, Prevalence and risk factors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV-monoinfection, AIDS, Vol: 31, Pages: 1621-1632, ISSN: 0269-9370

Journal article

Scott A, Mason S, Langdon A, Mayer E, Purkayastha Set al., 2017, Risk-factors for the development of post-operative urinary retention after day-case general surgery - a prospective study, International Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 53-54, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Alexander J, Perdones-Montero A, Scott A, Poynter L, Atkinson S, Soucek P, Hughes D, Susova S, Liska V, Goldin R, Marchesi J, Kinross J, Teare Jet al., 2017, A PROSPECTIVE MULTI-NATIONAL STUDY OF THE COLORECTAL CANCER MUCOSAL MICROBIOME REVEALS SPECIFIC TAXONOMIC CHANGES INDICATIVE OF DISEASE STAGE AND PROGNOSIS, Annual General Meeting of the British-Society-of-Gastroenterology (BSG), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A32-A33, ISSN: 0017-5749

Conference paper

Wolfer AM, Scott AJ, Rueb C, Gaudin M, Darzi A, Nicholson JK, Holmes E, Kinross JMet al., 2017, Longitudinal analysis of serum oxylipin profile as a novel descriptor of the inflammatory response to surgery, JOURNAL OF TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1479-5876

Background:Oxylipins are potent lipid mediators demonstrated to initiate and regulate inflammation yet little is known regarding their involvement in the response to surgical trauma. As key modulators of the inflammatory response, oxylipins have the potential to provide novel insights into the physiological response to surgery and the pathophysiology of post-operative complications. We aimed to investigate the effects of major surgery on longitudinal oxylipin profile.Methods:Adults patients undergoing elective laparoscopic or open colorectal resections were included. Primary outcomes were serum oxylipin profile quantified by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, serum white cell count and C-reactive protein concentration. Serum samples were taken at three time-points: pre-operative (day zero), early post-operative (day one) and late post-operative (day four/five).Results:Some 55 patients were included, of which 33 (60%) underwent surgery that was completed laparoscopically. Pre-operative oxylipin profiles were characterised by marked heterogeneity but surgery induced a common shift resulting in more homogeneity at the early post-operative time-point. By the late post-operative phase, oxylipin profiles were again highly variable. This evolution was driven by time-dependent changes in specific oxylipins. Notably, the levels of several oxylipins with anti-inflammatory properties (15-HETE and four regioisomers of DHET) were reduced at the early post-operative point before returning to baseline by the late post-operative period. In addition, levels of the pro-inflammatory 11-HETE rose in the early post-operative phase while levels of anti-thrombotic mediators (9-HODE and 13-HODE) fell; concentrations of all three oxylipins then remained fairly static from early to late post-operative phases. Compared to those undergoing laparoscopic surgery, patients undergoing open surgery had lower levels of some anti-inflammatory oxylipins (8,9-DHET and 17-HD

Journal article

Kinross JM, Alexander J, Perdones-Monter A, Cameron S, Scott A, Poynter L, Inglese P, Atkinson S, Soucek P, Hughes D, Susova S, Liska V, Goldin R, Takats Z, Marchesi J, Kinross J, Teare Jet al., 2017, A Prospective Multi-National Study of the Colorectal Cancer Mucosal Microbiome Reveals Specific Taxonomic Changes Indicative of Disease Stage and Prognosis, DDW

Conference paper

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