Imperial College London

Dr Alexandre Strapasson

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Honorary Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

alexandre.strapasson Website

 
 
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Location

 

403Weeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

79 results found

Bessah E, Raji AO, Taiwo OJ, Agodzo SK, Ololade OO, Strapasson A, Donkor Eet al., 2021, Gender-based variations in the perception of climate change impact, vulnerability and adaptation strategies in the Pra River Basin of Ghana, International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Pages: 1-28, ISSN: 1756-8692

PurposeThis study aims to assess gender-based differences on farmers’ perception of impacts and vulnerability to climate change and the implementation of adaptation strategies in the Pra River Basin of Ghana, while also providing lessons for other Sub-Saharan nations and regions with similar conditions.Design/methodology/approachThe study used semi-structured interviews and questionnaires to collect data from 344 farmers, 64 participants in focus group discussions and 6 agriculture extension officers (key informants) from 10 districts in the Pra River Basin of Ghana.FindingsResults showed several differences in how climate change is perceived and tackled by male and female genders. In the perception of male farmers, for example, they were found to be more vulnerable to increased temperature, and changes in rainfall and growing season, whereas female farmers on average were considered to be less resilient to floods and droughts for different reasons. Moreover, floods posed higher risks to farming than other climate change impacts. Gender roles had a significant correlation with the type of adaptation strategies practised. Men adopted agrochemicals more often than women, as an adaptation strategy.Research limitations/implicationsGender-differentiated interventions should be incorporated in the national climate change action plan for sustainable development in a rain-fed agricultural economy such as Ghana. The study recommends several actions to promote gender equity in the assessed region.Originality/valueThis research assessed the gender differentials in climate trends, impact, vulnerability and adaptation based on primary data collected between April and May 2019 and compared the results with climate data in the basin for the period 1991–2014. It is an empirical study focused on primary data analysis obtained in loco by authors, involving approximately 400 participants.

Journal article

Ferreira D, Strapasson A, Tininis A, Tininis CR, Pinho Get al., 2021, Biodiesel in Brazil: Challenges and Opportunities for a Sustainable Energy Transition, Turkey, 3rd Bioenergy Studies Symposium, Publisher: TAGEM and UNIDO, Pages: 72-72

Conference paper

Strapasson A, Falcão J, Rossberg T, Buss G, Woods J, Peterson Set al., 2021, Land Use Change and the European Biofuels Policy: The expansion of oilseed feedstocks on lands with high carbon stocks, Turkey, 3rd Bioenergy Studies Symposium, Publisher: TAGEM and UNIDO, Pages: 69-69

Conference paper

Strapasson A, Lee H, Schnettler J, 2021, Biofuels and the Energy-Water Nexus: Perspectives for the United States, Turkey, 3rd Bioenergy Studies Symposium, Publisher: TAGEM and UNIDO, Pages: 65-65

Conference paper

Schlindwein SL, Vasconcelos ACFD, Bonatti M, Sieber S, Strapasson A, Lana Met al., 2021, Agricultural land use dynamics in the Brazilian part of La Plata Basin: From driving forces to societal responses, Land Use Policy, Vol: 107, ISSN: 0264-8377

This paper provides an analysis of the land use dynamics observed in the Brazilian part of La Plata Basin (BR-LPB) from 1988 to 2018, including major crops such as maize, soybean, wheat, and sugarcane. It also assesses the perception of farmers and other stakeholders on climate change effects and the design of adaptation strategies. Two case studies were carried out and the DPSIR (Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response) conceptual framework was used to structure the complex relationships driving current land use dynamics in BR-LPB. The first case was an assessment of land use change based on the cultivated area of annual and semi-perennial crops over the whole BR-LPB, using macro-spatial data from 1988 to 2018. The second case consisted of a survey carried out in the municipality of Anchieta to assess at local level if land use change has been driven by the perception of farmers on climate change and its effects. When contrasted with changes on average annual temperature and precipitation for the same time period, the results show that land use dynamics in the BR-LPB as a whole was mostly driven by an increased global demand for food commodities rather than by climate effects, whereas at local level the perception of farmers on climate change effects has already influenced the adoption of adaptation strategies. No evidence was found that climate dynamics has significantly influenced the geography of agricultural land use in the BR-LPB in this period. While using the DPSIR framework, the results of both case studies highlight important inter-relationships allowing a comprehensive overview on how land use change in the BR-LPB is related to some major drivers (e.g. population growth, growing demand of agricultural products, and droughts) and how they might influence the design of purposeful adaptation responses and policy making.

Journal article

Ferreira M, Silva Filho OL, Strapasson A, Portugal K, Maciel ACet al., 2021, Digital simulators in the epistemological context of Gagné and Vygotsky: a didactic intervention proposal on electricity and electrical circuits, Revista de Enseñanza de la Física, ISSN: 2250-6101

This article provides a didactic intervention proposal, using Robert Gagné and Lev Vygotsky as theoretical references, involving experimental simulators as a didactic resource. Such references are harmonized with each other, and, as a result of this merge, important elements for to the teaching and learning process in Physics emerge. The use of simulators considers the increasing usage of Digital Information and Communication Technologies by students immersed in a digital culture and their relevance for the development of social-interactionist skills, which form the basis of Vygotsky’s perspective. The suggested didactic intervention deals with the theme of electricity and the construction of electrical circuits as a practical example of the application of simulators in the pedagogical process. In addition, aligned with this theoretical framework, the concept of Zone of Proximal Development is used to assess both students and the teacher’s didactics.

Journal article

Strapasson A, Ferreira M, Cruz-Cano D, Woods J, Soares MP, Silva Filho OLet al., 2021, The Use of System Dynamics for Energy and Environmental Education, London, Imperial College Education Week 20201: Rising to a healthy challenge: Building beyond blended, Publisher: Imperial College London

Conference paper

Strapasson A, Oduor CO, Domeniconi B, 2021, Livestock Production, Life Cycle Assessment: A Metric for the Circular Economy, Editors: Borrion, Black, Mwabonje, London, Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry, Pages: 290-316, ISBN: 978-1-78801-445-8

In this chapter, livestock production is assessed in the context of the circular economy (CE). It starts with an overview of livestock production chains, followed by two country-level case studies: a discussion on the sustainability of beef production in Brazil, which is currently the largest beef-exporting nation globally; and an assessment of carbon cycles of pasturelands in Kenya. We then present a description of a global simulation tool on behavioural changes in diets, land use and livestock yield by 2050. The global simulation tool is called the Global Calculator, and can generate multiple scenarios for land use, energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Thus, the chapter provides a systems view on livestock production, from local to global, with theoretical simulations and practical examples. The results show that sustainable meat production is dependent on several interconnected issues, requiring complex systems models to be properly assessed and understood. However, two relatively simple measures can be taken in order to reduce the environmental footprint of livestock production: a sustainable increase in livestock productivity along with a reduction in per capita meat consumption, especially in nations that already have high consumption levels. To this end, actions related to agricultural management, land multiuse, behavioural changes and animal welfare must be part of a policy agenda for climate change mitigation and environmental conservation worldwide.

Book chapter

Vallejo L, Mazur C, Strapasson A, Cockerill T, Gambhir A, Hills T, Jennings M, Jones O, Kalas N, Keirstead J, Khor C, Napp T, Tong D, Woods J, Shah Net al., 2021, Halving Global CO2 Emissions by 2050: Technologies and Costs, International Energy Journal, Vol: 21, Pages: 147-158, ISSN: 1513-718X

This study provides a whole-systems simulation on how to halve global CO2 emissions by 2050, compared to 2010, with an emphasis on technologies and costs, in order to avoid a dangerous increase in the global mean surface temperature by end the of this century. There still remains uncertainty as to how much a low-carbon energy system costs compared to a high-carbon system. Integrated assessment models (IAMs) show a large range of costs of mitigation towards the 2°C target, with up to an order of magnitude difference between the highest and lowest cost, depending on a number of factors including model structure, technology availability and costs, and the degree of feedback with the wider macro-economy. A simpler analysis potentially serves to highlight where costs fall and to what degree. Here we show that the additional cost of a low-carbon energy system is less than 1% of global GDP more than a system resulting from low mitigation effort. The proposed approach aligns with some previous IAMs and other projections discussed in the paper, whilst also providing a clearer and more detailed view of the world. Achieving this system by 2050, with CO2 emissions of about 15GtCO2, depends heavily on decarbonisation of the electricity sector to around 100gCO2/kWh, as well as on maximising energy efficiency potential across all sectors. This scenario would require a major mitigation effort in all the assessed world regions. However, in order to keep the global mean surface temperature increase below 1.5°C, it would be necessary to achieve net-zero emission by 2050, requiring a much further mitigation effort.

Journal article

Bessah E, Donkor E, Raji AO, Taiwo OJ, Agodzo SK, Ololade OO, Strapasson Aet al., 2021, Determinants of Maize Farmers’ Access to Climate Information Services in Ghana, Handbook of Climate Change Management, Editors: Leal Filho, Luetz, Ayal, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 1-20, ISBN: 9783030227593

Agriculture plays a central role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Ghana. However, climate change impacts may reduce the potential of agriculture to achieve SDGs, given that the agricultural sector in Ghana is heavily dependent on rainfall and prevailed by smallholder farmers, with limited access to agronomical assistance and climate information. Lack of empirical evidence on farmers’ access to climate information services (CIS) is a challenge. This chapter focused on the analysis of the factors that influence maize farmers’ access to CIS based on a field study carried out in selected districts of Ashanti, Central, and Eastern regions of Ghana. A binary probit regression model was employed in the empirical analysis of 344 maize farmers’ access to several types of local services. The results revealed that a low percentage of farmers has received CIS. Access to health-care facility, market, tarred road, native farmers, farm size, and climate change awareness level have a significant positive correlation with the farmers’ likelihood of receiving CIS. Although correlation does not necessarily mean causality, the results show that access to climate services must be understood as part of a broader development issue in Ghana. Therefore, it is not sufficient to invest in the provision of high-quality climate information alone, but also ensure that smallholder farmers get such information and receive the necessary support to effectively use this information for improving their agricultural practices, while reducing their local vulnerabilities to climate change.

Book chapter

Roque AADO, Rocha JV, Seixas SRDC, Strapasson A, Interliche PHet al., 2020, Vulnerabilidade agrária-socioambiental em São Paulo, Redução do risco de desastres e a resiliência no meio rural e urbano, Editors: Magnoni Júnior, Freitas, Lopes, Castro, Barbosa, Londe, Magnoni, Silva, Teixeira, Figueiredo, São Paulo, Brazil, Publisher: Centro Paula Souza and AGB Bauru, Pages: 162-199, ISBN: 9786587877129

Book chapter

Ferreira D, Strapasson A, Tininis AG, Tininis CRCS, Pinho GCet al., 2020, Biodiesel no Brasil: desafios e oportunidades para uma transição energética sustentável, Transição Energética, Justiça Geracional e Mudanças Climáticas, Rio de Janeiro, Publisher: Editora Lumen Juris, Pages: 319-347, ISBN: 9786555103694

O biodiesel foi inserido na matriz energética brasileira em 2005, por meio de uma política pública robusta que deu suporte ao desenvolvimento da indústria e da agricultura, criando um mercado compulsório que se ampliou aos atuais 12%, com previsão de 15% em mescla ao diesel mineral até 2023 e com metas de inclusão social e desenvolvimento regional. Passados 15 anos, o PNPB vive um momento de revisões seja pelo avanço tecnológico ou pelo processo de desinvestimento da Petrobras, que detém papel fundamental na comercialização do biodiesel por meio de leiloes. No caso dos avanços tecnológicos, o movimento de eletrificação da frota e da inovação na produção de biocombustíveis avançados para motores ciclo diesel, já em produção e comercialização em outros países, implicam em revisões na regulação, de maneira que não se imponham barreiras aos avanços, sobretudo aqueles que reduzem emissões de GEE e aumentam a eficiência global dos processos produtivos associados aos biocombustíveis. Além disso, é importante que tais avanços sejam analisados e introduzidos sob uma ótica holística que considere o desenvolvimento social no tripé da sustentabilidade. No caso dos leiloes, a maturidade alcançada pelo segmento vislumbra a possibilidade de uma abertura do mercado, a qual possibilitaria maior competitividade, considerando a possibilidade de livre negociação entre distribuidoras e usinas produtoras, melhorando o sinal de preço. Nesse contexto, há a possibilidade de modernização do selo combustível social, de forma a aumentar a sua efetividade frente aos objetivos iniciais do programa.

Book chapter

Bessah E, Raji A, Taiwo O, Agodzo S, Ololade O, Strapasson A, Larbi Iet al., 2020, Extreme changes of daily rainfall and temperature patterns in a tropical sub-humid basin: A statistical downscaling assessment for the 21st century, Climate Change Virtual 2020: Exploring the possibilities to overcome climate change challenges, Publisher: Magus Group, Pages: 21-22

Climate change has exacerbated the occurrence of extreme weather events in many regions worldwide. The objective of this study was to assess extreme temperature and rainfall variations in the Pra River Basin (a tropical sub-humid basin in Ghana), as a case-study potentially applicable to other similar regions globally. The methodology was based on the use of different climate models. Firstly, we tested the capability of the statistical downscaling model SDSM-DC to simulate past extreme climate indices for the period 1981 – 2010 (observed). We then projected temperature indices for the period 2011 – 2100 under CMIP5 RCP4.5 and 8.5 emission scenarios in the basin. Ten rainfall and nine temperature extreme indices were examined and the accuracy of SDSM-DC was evaluated with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and Percent bias. The results show that observed number of heavy precipitation days increased, whilst consecutive wet days and consecutive dry days decreased, although the trend was not significant. Moreover, observed warm and cool temperature generally showed a significant increasing and decreasing trend, respectively. Performance analysis shows that SDSM-DC had a poor accuracy level in simulating rainfall indices; however, whilst simulating TX90p, TX10p, TN10p and DTR, the model was acceptable at more than 50% of the stations. Generally, TX90p showed a significant increasing trend, whereas TX10p, TN10p and DTR showed a significant decreasing trend between 2011 and 2100 under both RCP4.5 and 8.5. By 2100, under the RCP4.5 scenario, TX90p, TX10p, TN10p and DTR could increase by 0.72%, 0.36%, 0.35% and decrease 0.08°C respectively; whereas under the RCP8.5 scenario it could increase by 0.73%, 0.32%, 0.34% and decrease 0.15°C respectively. Therefore, the continuous warming trend poses threat to water resources, food security (including pest invasion, e.g. armyworms) and human health in the basin. The findings are relevant for adaptation and management

Conference paper

Strapasson A, Woods J, Meessen J, Mwabonje O, Baudry G, Mbuk Ket al., 2020, EU land use futures: modelling food, bioenergy and carbon dynamics, Energy Strategy Reviews, Vol: 31, Pages: 100545-100545, ISSN: 2211-467X

This paper presents an original system dynamics model, which aims to assess how changes in diet, agricultural practices, bioenergy and forestry could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We demonstrate that changes in types and quantities of food consumed and reductions in food wastes along with sustainable bioenergy and forestry dynamics would materially assist the EU in meeting its 2050 climate mitigation obligations. We find that overall rates of EU-28 greenhouse gas emissions are highly sensitive to the food trade balance, both within and outside the EU. Land use itself is often under-represented as a major option for carbon mitigation in policy strategies, but our results show that it must become a central component aligned with energy system decarbonization if material levels of warming mitigation are to be achieved.

Journal article

Strapasson A, Woods J, Pérez-Cirera V, Elizondo A, Cruz-Cano D, Pestiaux J, Cornet M, Chaturvedi Ret al., 2020, Modelling carbon mitigation pathways by 2050: insights from the global calculator, Energy Strategy Reviews, Vol: 29, Pages: 100494-100494, ISSN: 2211-467X

The Global Calculator (GC) can be used to assess a wide range of climate change mitigation pathways. The GC is an accessible integrated model which calculates the cumulative emissions of a basket of the main greenhouse gases that result from a set of technological and lifestyle choices made at the global level and as defined by the user within a single system dynamics tool. Using the GC, we simulated ambitious scenarios against business as usual trends in order to stay below 2oC and 1.5oC of maximum temperature change by the end of this century and carried out a sensitivity analysis of the entire GC model option space. We show that the calculator is useful for making broad simulations for energy, carbon and land use dynamics, and demonstrate how combined and sustained mitigation efforts across different sectors are urgently needed to meet climate targets.

Journal article

Li Y, Strapasson A, Rojas O, 2020, Assessment of El Nino and La Nina impacts on China: Enhancing the Early Warning System on Food and Agriculture, WEATHER AND CLIMATE EXTREMES, Vol: 27, ISSN: 2212-0947

Journal article

Strapasson A, Woods J, Donaldson A, 2020, Bulb Calculator: An Independent Review, London, Publisher: Imperial College Consultants

Report commissioned by Bulb Energy Limited (UK). This report is the independent expert opinion of the authors.

Report

Strapasson A, Mwabonje O, Woods J, Baudry Get al., 2020, Pathways towards a fair and just net-zero emissions Europe by 2050: Insights from the EUCalc for carbon mitigation strategies, Publisher: European Commission, 9

HEADLINES:• Achieving socially just and sustainable transition to a net-zero emissions Europe by 2050 requires urgent and substantive changes in the use of technology and the behavioural choices of its people. • These changes will be pervasive, covering all sectors of the economy, from transport, manufacturing, agriculture and power generation. The choices we make as individuals and as national governments of services and goods we produce and consume, e.g. the foods we grow and eat, the sizes of our households and how we heat and cool them, our mobility and in our trading relationships with the rest of the world, are key determinants of successfully meeting the climate challenge. • It is possible to achieve a net-zero greenhouse gas emission in Europe by 2050, in time to meet global climate targets, but it requires unprecedented levels of innovations in technologies and in the adoption of sustainable lifestyles, diets and land use. • Avoiding confounding carbon leakage: the international trade balance (imports vs. exports) in the EU has and will continue to have a significant impact on internal EU and external (rest of the world) greenhouse gas emissions, materially affecting the EU’s timeline to achieving net zero and globally effective climate mitigation.• Policies that support the accelerated decoupling of economic growth from greenhouse gas emissions are needed along with incentives for the rest of the world to decarbonise if confounding leakage is to be avoided. • No single sector can, by itself, materially reduce or sequester greenhouse gases; however, actions affecting the carbon stocks on land and the greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture are urgently required. • Systemic changes at personal, local, national and regional levels are all important and publicly acceptable policies for transitioning to a net-zero emissions society are fundamental in order to meet the EU climate change targets. • Tools, such as th

Report

Baudry G, Mwabonje O, Strapasson A, Woods Jet al., 2020, Mitigating GHG Emissions through Agriculture and Sustainable Land Use: An Overview on the EUCalc Food & Land Module, www.european-calculator.eu, Publisher: European Commission, 5

HEADLINES:• Several options are available for evaluating potential agriculture and land use interventions by 2050, including: climate smart production systems for crops, livestock and forestry products, land management, alternative protein sources for livestock, bioenergy, and the management of organic wastes and residues.• Agriculture and land use can either help mitigate GHG emissions through enhancing the net land carbon sink or exacerbate emissions by emitting more GHGs than are taken up overtime.• With combined action at the highest levels of mitigation ambition in the food (supply and demand) and agricultural sectors, we estimate that over 1 000 Million tonnes of CO2 removals per year could be generated by 2050. This would require systemic, sustained and transformative change in the levels of technological and behavioural innovation applied in all EU Member States. • Changes in diet are a significant driver that enable and/or disable the range and extent of the sustainable mitigation options for the agricultural production system. Agroecology is a suitable option for the European agriculture production system, only when a dietary shift occurs that reduces demand for high emission agricultural products. • Agricultural intensification can ‘free up’ the land needed, expanding forests and grasslands, but there are inherent limits for achieving sustainable intensification without causing major impacts on animal welfare, biodiversity and natural resources such as water and plant nutrients.• The EU international food trade balance (imports vs. exports) has and will continue to have a significant impact on land use dynamics inside and outside Europe. • Climate change mitigation efforts on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) and sustainable biomass provision are fundamental components in achieving a net zero-emission pathway, when carefully implemented along with ambitious levels of mitigation in the transport

Report

Bessah E, Raji A, Taiwo O, Agodzo S, Ololade O, Strapasson Aet al., 2020, Hydrological responses to climate and land use changes: The paradox of regional and local climate effect in the Pra River Basin of Ghana, Journal of Hydrology Regional Studies, Vol: 27, ISSN: 2214-5818

Study Region: Pra River Basin, Ghana.Study Focus: The study modelled the changes in water yield using regional, sub-regional and local climate conditions from modelling outputs at spatial resolutions of 44 km, 12 km and 0.002 km respectively to drive the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs model at three time periods of land use land cover (LULC). Changes in historical water yield (simulated for 1986, 2002 & 2018 LULC using the mean climatic parameters from 1981-2010) and future scenario (simulated for 2018 LULC using the mean climatic parameters from 2020-2049) for annual, seasonal and monthly periods were assessed.New Hydrological Insights for the Region: The results show that future annual water yield could change by -46%, -48%, +44% and -35% under the regional, sub-regional, local and ensemble mean of the climate scenarios respectively. Seasonal water yield from the ensemble mean of thefuture climate scenario was projected to decrease between 2-16 mm, with a mean decrease of 33.39% during the December–February season. There was no directional effect of spatial resolution on water yield. The future period could be impacted by both drought and flood. Werecommend that re/afforestation should be encouraged to improve infiltration and reduce deforestation which was 2.27% per annum in the assessed period to prevent flood causing runoffs, while irrigation technology will help to improve resilience to drought.

Journal article

Falcão J, Strapasson A, Medeiros H, Weber N, Barbosa Met al., 2019, Energia & Gênero: Avaliação sobre Igualdade de Gênero no Setor de Energia do Brasil, 10º Congresso Brasileiro de P&D em Petróleo e Gás, Publisher: Associação Brasileira de P&D em Petróleo e Gás (ABPG)

This paper focuses on gender equality in the Brazilian energy sector, including both public and private sectors. It provides an assessment on how gender inequality impacts on women, and how their presence in decision-making roles can lead to more diverse and better practices that can positively influence a sustainable transition towards social inclusion and a successful clean energy paradigm. It also considers the development of a gender-responsive approach to designing opportunities for women in energy technology and innovation. The methodology was based on literature review, surveys and interviews through online questionnaires and in-person meetings with several representatives from the energy sector in Brazil, as well as international comparative analysis, including country-level case studies. Our results indicate two shortcomings at the government level that hinders the design and monitoring of policies for gender equality: lack of data disaggregated by gender, and absence of gender policies. The assessment demonstrates that overcoming barriers for gender issues in the energy sector requires not only a recognition of the baseline or the current situation in the country, but also a good monitoring of indicators, in order to identify the problem and support public policies, companies and NGOs’ project management. The full report related to this conference paper was commissioned by the British Embassy Brasilia through the UK Government's Prosperity Fund and is available at: https://doi.org/10.13140/rg.2.2.19253.52964The conference paper is available only in Portuguese version at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/337844531_Energia_Genero_Avaliacao_sobre_Igualdade_de_Genero_no_Setor_de_Energia_do_Brasil

Conference paper

Ferreira D, Strapasson A, Andrade P, Silva Set al., 2019, Programa de Produção Sustentável da Palma de Óleo no Brasil - Avanços e Desafios, 7° Congresso da Rede Brasileira de Tecnologia e Inovação de Biodiesel, Publisher: Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovation and Communications (MCTIC)

Conference paper

Strapasson A, Ferreira D, Costa HC, Pinto JOet al., 2019, Avaliação de Centros de Energia no Brasil: Estudo Prospectivo para Criação de um Centro de Energia Brasil-Reino Unido, 71st Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science (SBPC), Publisher: SBPC, Pages: 1-4, ISSN: 2176-1221

O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o interesse e a viabilidade decriação de um centro integrado de energia no Brasil, que atuaria em articulação com os centros existentes no país e em parcerias internacionais, com vistas a facilitar investimentos em pesquisa, desenvolvimento e inovação tecnológica, bem como em assuntosregulatórios. O trabalho foi contratado pela Embaixada Britânica no Brasil, com apoio do UK Prosperity Fund. Foi realizado um amplo mapeamento dos centros existentes, entrevistas com lideranças do setor energético nacional, e uma simulação de custos indicativos para construção e operação desse centro. Entre os principais resultados, recomenda-se pela criação de um Centro de Energia Brasil-Reino Unido, com legitimidade, independência e sustentabilidade financeira, envolvendo representantes do setor de energia e academia.

Conference paper

Strapasson A, Falcão J, Rossberg T, Buss G, Woods J, Peterson Set al., 2019, Land use change and the European biofuels policy: The expansion of oilseed feedstocks on lands with high carbon stocks, OCL - Oilseeds and fats, crops and lipids, Vol: 26, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2272-6977

The focus of this article is on the potential land use change impacts associated with the oilseed-based biodiesel consumption. The three main crops used for biodiesel production to date are oilseed rape (OSR), soybeans and oil palm. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to provide a technical assessment of potential land use change arising from the growth of these three major crops at global level, obtained through a broad country-level analysis for their respective major producing countries. The article presents an historical data analysis, evaluating the interaction between the expansion and contraction of these three crops over the last three decades (with a closer look from 2008) together with the carbon stock changes to the land. We categorise the land use by its carbon stock and resulting carbon stock changes from land use change. Crops aimed at the production of ethanol, such as maize (corn), sugarcane, wheat, cassava and sugar beet, although extremely relevant for biofuel policies, are not the subject of this present study. While we did not know at the time of writing this report how the term “significant” would be defined in the EU delegated act we concluded from the analysis of the historical data and using the high ILUC-risk definition as it stands, that the emissions associated with palm and soy are significant. For oil palm, we take Indonesia and Malaysia as proxy for the global position. We calculate an average expansion of 29% on high carbon stock land. For soy, we calculate a global average of 19% expansion. We calculate the global average greenhouse gas emissions intensities based on the ILUC-risks as 56 gCO2eq/MJ for soy oil and 108 gCO2eq/MJ for palm oil. Future projections (OECD-FAO, 2017) suggest these numbers could drop significantly. We do not find evidence for high ILUC-risk expansion of oilseed rape.

Journal article

Soares MP, Ferreira M, Strapasson A, Silva Filho OLet al., 2019, Mediating the learning of electrical circuits in physics: teaching unit proposal using the flipped classroom model, Physicae Organum, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 2446-564X

Mediating the learning of electrical circuits in the field of Physics teaching is challenging, requiring high abstraction skills from the student and innovative didactics from the teacher. The objective of this paper is to propose a reflexive teaching unit on electrical circuits for high school students, adequate to Brazil’s current national curriculum standards. The proposal is based on the use of the flipped classroom model in the light of Lev Vygotsky’s cognitive development theory, both in the social perspective of students in classroom and in their activities outside the school premises. Different methodological teaching strategies were used in order to foster situations in which students are the protagonists of their own learning, while consciously and consistently exploring their potential. As a result, at the end of the proposed teaching unit, the students are expected to be able to recognize and associate the concepts studied with practical situations of their daily lives. In addition, it is expected that the students would have acquired autonomy in their learning processes and developed social and cognitive skills, as well as would be able to create graphic and mental models on the operation and application of electrical circuits.

Journal article

Strapasson A, 2019, Das relações entre o humano e a natureza num país em transe, Revista Política Democrática, Pages: 10-13, ISSN: 1518-7446

Journal article

Falcão J, Strapasson A, Costa H, Masulino N, Barbosa Met al., 2019, Energy & Gender: An assessment on gender equality in the energy sector in Brazil, Brasilia, Brazil, Publisher: British Embassy Brasilia

Report

Strapasson A, Ferreira D, Costa HKDM, Pinto JOPet al., 2019, Assessment of Energy Centres in Brazil: A prospective study for the creation of an integrated energy centre in Brazil, Brasilia, Brazil, Publisher: British Embassy in Brazil

HEADLINES:• The authors advise the British Embassy to create a Brazil-UK Energy Centre, with legitimacy, independence, and financial sustainability, involving leading stakeholders from the energy sector and academia.• This project identified 419 relevant stakeholders for the purpose of creating an integrated energy centre in Brazil, being 175 energy companies, 86 associations, 117 research and development institutions, and 41 governmental bodies. • 80 representative stakeholders were contacted and interviewed for this project through in-person meetings or online questionnaires. Most of the participants considered the initiative as very positive, but its success would depend on its governance model, funding source and operational system. It is fundamental to have a centre with credibility and influence. • The energy centre could act as a centre of intelligence for energy strategies, contributing for a constructive dialogue with the energy sector and international partners, avoiding overlaps and competition with existing initiatives. Key areas of interest include project management, new technologies, bioenergy, smart-grids, distributed generation, regulation, international cooperation, renewable energies, and the transition to a low carbon economy.• The capital costs for installing this centre are estimated at R$ 153K in total (£ 31K), excluding property purchase. The estimated operational costs would vary from R$ 295K (£ 59K) to R$ 398K (£ 80K) a month, depending on location, staff and salaries involved. These estimates include property rentals, but buying a property is also an option. A high standard executive office with approximately 200 m2 is estimated from R$ 2,210K (£ 442K) to R$ 2,502K (£ 500K). The cities of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Brasília were assessed in this study.

Report

Strapasson A, Falcão J, Rossberg T, Buss G, Woods Jet al., 2019, Land Use Change and the European Biofuels Policy: The expansion of oilseed feedstocks on lands with high carbon stocks, Bedford, United Kingdom, Publisher: LCAworks

Report

Sandstrom S, Strapasson A, 2017, Socio-Environmental Assessment of Gender Equality, Pastoralism, Agriculture and Climate Information in Rural Communities of Northern Tanzania, Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security, Vol: 2, Pages: 66-83, ISSN: 2413-922X

Investment in climate services in support of climate change adaptation has increased, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. As this is a relatively new field of practice, little research is available to inform the design of these interventions. The aim of this research is to contribute to building knowledge around this theme. Given the gender dynamics inherent in decision making on livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, we focus on differences in the use of climate services between men and women. We use quantitative and qualitative methods to critically discuss and review the barriers that exist for the use of climate information in making livelihoods related decisions. The results indicate that a link exists between households accessing productive assets and taking action on the basis of climate information, and revealed a large gender inequality across all the assessed variables. What emerged clearly is the need for interventions to be based on needs assessments to ensure that services provided are usable.

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