Imperial College London

ProfessorAnneLingford-Hughes

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Chair in Addiction Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8682anne.lingford-hughes Website

 
 
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Location

 

Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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304 results found

Ostinelli EG, Smith K, Zangani C, Ostacher MJ, Lingford-Hughes AR, Hong JSW, Macdonald O, Cipriani Aet al., 2022, COVID-19 and substance use disorders: a review of international guidelines for frontline healthcare workers of addiction services, BMC PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 22

Journal article

Dhital R, Coleman R, Day E, Drummond C, Lingford-Hughes A, Marsden J, Phillips T, Sinclair J, Strang J, Weinman J, Whittlesea C, Widyaratna K, Donoghue Ket al., 2022, Service Users' Views and Experiences of Alcohol Relapse Prevention Treatment and Adherence: New Role for Pharmacists?, ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM, ISSN: 0735-0414

Journal article

Mozgunov P, Cro S, Lingford-Hughes A, Paterson LM, Jaki Tet al., 2022, A dose-finding design for dual-agent trials with patient-specific doses for one agent with application to an opiate detoxification trial, Pharmaceutical Statistics: the journal of applied statistics in the pharmaceutical industry, Vol: 21, Pages: 476-495, ISSN: 1539-1604

There is a growing interest in early phase dose-finding clinical trials studying combinations of several treatments. While the majority of dose finding designs for such setting were proposed for oncology trials, the corresponding designs are also essential in other therapeutic areas. Furthermore, there is increased recognition of recommending the patient-specific doses/combinations, rather than a single target one that would be recommended to all patients in later phases regardless of their characteristics. In this paper, we propose a dose-finding design for a dual-agent combination trial motivated by an opiate detoxification trial. The distinguishing feature of the trial is that the (continuous) dose of one compound is defined externally by the clinicians and is individual for every patient. The objective of the trial is to define the dosing function that for each patient would recommend the optimal dosage of the second compound. Via a simulation study, we have found that the proposed design results in high accuracy of individual dose recommendation and is robust to the model misspecification and assumptions on the distribution of externally defined doses.

Journal article

Sparasci O, Bhui K, Biswas A, Chamberlain S, Dubicka B, Dudas R, Farooq S, Ford T, Husain N, Jones I, Killaspy H, Lee W, Lingford-Hughes A, Mulholland C, Rubinsztein J, Shankar R, Sharma A, Sinclair L, Stone J, Young Aet al., 2022, Impact of COVID-19 on mental health research: is this the breaking point?, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, ISSN: 0007-1250

Journal article

Grabski M, McAndrew A, Lawn W, Marsh B, Raymen L, Stevens T, Hardy L, Warren F, Bloomfield M, Borissova A, Maschauer E, Broomby R, Price R, Coathup R, Gilhooly D, Palmer E, Gordon-Williams R, Hill R, Harris J, Mollaahmetoglu OM, Curran HV, Brandner B, Lingford-Hughes A, Morgan CJAet al., 2022, Adjunctive Ketamine With Relapse Prevention-Based Psychological Therapy in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 179, Pages: 152-162, ISSN: 0002-953X

Journal article

Venkataraman AV, Bai W, Whittington A, Myers JF, Rabiner EA, Lingford-Hughes A, Matthews PMet al., 2021, Boosting the diagnostic power of amyloid-β PET using a data-driven spatially informed classifier for decision support, Alzheimer's Research and Therapy, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 1758-9193

BackgroundAmyloid-β (Aβ) PET has emerged as clinically useful for more accurate diagnosis of patients with cognitive decline. Aβ deposition is a necessary cause or response to the cellular pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Usual clinical and research interpretation of amyloid PET does not fully utilise all information regarding the spatial distribution of signal. We present a data-driven, spatially informed classifier to boost the diagnostic power of amyloid PET in AD.MethodsVoxel-wise k-means clustering of amyloid-positive voxels was performed; clusters were mapped to brain anatomy and tested for their associations by diagnostic category and disease severity with 758 amyloid PET scans from volunteers in the AD continuum from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). A machine learning approach based on this spatially constrained model using an optimised quadratic support vector machine was developed for automatic classification of scans for AD vs non-AD pathology.ResultsThis classifier boosted the accuracy of classification of AD scans to 81% using the amyloid PET alone with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.91 compared to other spatial methods. This increased sensitivity to detect AD by 15% and the AUC by 9% compared to the use of a composite region of interest SUVr.ConclusionsThe diagnostic classification accuracy of amyloid PET was improved using an automated data-driven spatial classifier. Our classifier highlights the importance of considering the spatial variation in Aβ PET signal for optimal interpretation of scans. The algorithm now is available to be evaluated prospectively as a tool for automated clinical decision support in research settings.

Journal article

Venkataraman A, Bishop C, Mansur A, Rizzo G, Lewis Y, Kocagoncu E, Lingford-Hughes A, Huiban M, Passchier J, Rowe JB, Tsukada H, Brooks DJ, Martarello L, Comley RA, Chen L, Hargreaves R, Schwarz AJ, Gunn RN, Rabiner E, Matthews PMet al., 2021, Imaging synaptic microstructure and synaptic loss in vivo in early Alzheimer’s Disease, Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Background Synaptic loss and neurite dystrophy are early events in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). We aimed to characterise early synaptic microstructural changes in vivo.Methods MRI neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were used to image cortical microstructure in both sporadic, late onset, amyloid PET positive AD patients and healthy controls (total n = 28). We derived NODDI measures of grey matter extracellular free water (FISO), neurite density (NDI) and orientation dispersion (ODI), which provides an index of neurite branching and orientation, as well as more conventional DTI measures of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean/axial/radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD, respectively). We also performed [11C]UCB-J PET, which provides a specific measure of the density of pre-synaptic vesicular protein SV2A. Both sets of measures were compared to regional brain volumes.Results The AD patients showed expected relative decreases in regional brain volumes (range, -6 to - 23%) and regional [11C]UCB-J densities (range, -2 to -25%). Differences between AD and controls were greatest in the hippocampus. NODDI microstructural measures showed greater FISO (range, +26 to +44%) in AD, with little difference in NDI (range, -1 to +7%) and mild focal changes in ODI (range, -4 to +3%). Regionally greater FISO and lower [11C]UCB-J binding were correlated across grey matter in patients (most strongly in the caudate, r2 = 0.37, p = 0.001). FISO and DTI RD were strongly positively associated, particularly in the hippocampus (r2 = 0.98, p < 7.4 × 10−9). After 12-18 months we found a 5% increase in FISO in the temporal lobe, but little change across all ROIs in NDI and ODI. An exploratory analysis showed higher parietal lobe FISO was associated with lower language scores in people with AD.Conclusions We interpreted the increased extracellular free water as a possible consequence of glial activation. The dynamic range of disease

Working paper

Herlinger K, Lingford-Hughes A, 2021, Addressing unmet needs in opiate dependence: supporting detoxification and advances in relapse prevention, BJPSYCH ADVANCES, Vol: 27, Pages: 362-372, ISSN: 2056-4678

Journal article

Nutt D, Hayes A, Fonville L, Zafar R, Palmer EOC, Paterson L, Lingford-Hughes Aet al., 2021, Alcohol and the Brain, NUTRIENTS, Vol: 13

Journal article

Evans RA, McAuley H, Harrison EM, Shikotra A, Singapuri A, Sereno M, Elneima O, Docherty AB, Lone NI, Leavy OC, Daines L, Baillie JK, Brown JS, Chalder T, De Soyza A, Diar Bakerly N, Easom N, Geddes JR, Greening NJ, Hart N, Heaney LG, Heller S, Howard L, Hurst JR, Jacob J, Jenkins RG, Jolley C, Kerr S, Kon OM, Lewis K, Lord JM, McCann GP, Neubauer S, Openshaw PJM, Parekh D, Pfeffer P, Rahman NM, Raman B, Richardson M, Rowland M, Semple MG, Shah AM, Singh SJ, Sheikh A, Thomas D, Toshner M, Chalmers JD, Ho L-P, Horsley A, Marks M, Poinasamy K, Wain LV, Brightling CE, PHOSP-COVID Collaborative Groupet al., 2021, Physical, cognitive, and mental health impacts of COVID-19 after hospitalisation (PHOSP-COVID): a UK multicentre, prospective cohort study, The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, Vol: 9, Pages: 1275-1287, ISSN: 2213-2600

BACKGROUND: The impact of COVID-19 on physical and mental health and employment after hospitalisation with acute disease is not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of COVID-19-related hospitalisation on health and employment, to identify factors associated with recovery, and to describe recovery phenotypes. METHODS: The Post-hospitalisation COVID-19 study (PHOSP-COVID) is a multicentre, long-term follow-up study of adults (aged ≥18 years) discharged from hospital in the UK with a clinical diagnosis of COVID-19, involving an assessment between 2 and 7 months after discharge, including detailed recording of symptoms, and physiological and biochemical testing. Multivariable logistic regression was done for the primary outcome of patient-perceived recovery, with age, sex, ethnicity, body-mass index, comorbidities, and severity of acute illness as covariates. A post-hoc cluster analysis of outcomes for breathlessness, fatigue, mental health, cognitive impairment, and physical performance was done using the clustering large applications k-medoids approach. The study is registered on the ISRCTN Registry (ISRCTN10980107). FINDINGS: We report findings for 1077 patients discharged from hospital between March 5 and Nov 30, 2020, who underwent assessment at a median of 5·9 months (IQR 4·9-6·5) after discharge. Participants had a mean age of 58 years (SD 13); 384 (36%) were female, 710 (69%) were of white ethnicity, 288 (27%) had received mechanical ventilation, and 540 (50%) had at least two comorbidities. At follow-up, only 239 (29%) of 830 participants felt fully recovered, 158 (20%) of 806 had a new disability (assessed by the Washington Group Short Set on Functioning), and 124 (19%) of 641 experienced a health-related change in occupation. Factors associated with not recovering were female sex, middle age (40-59 years), two or more comorbidities, and more severe acute illness. The magnitude of the persistent health bur

Journal article

Palmer EOC, Trender W, Tyacke RJ, Hampshire A, Lingford-Hughes Aet al., 2021, Impact of COVID-19 restrictions on alcohol consumption behaviours, BJPsych Open, Vol: 7, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 2056-4724

BackgroundWe aimed to evaluate how coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions had altered individual's drinking behaviours, including consumption, hangover experiences, and motivations to drink, and changing levels of depression and anxiety.MethodWe conducted an online cross-sectional self-report survey. Whole group analysis compared pre- versus post-COVID restrictions. A correlation coefficient matrix evaluated the associations between all outcome scores. Self-report data was compared with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores from the 2014 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Multiple linear modelling (MLM) was calculated to identify factors associated with increasing AUDIT scores and post-restriction AUDIT scores.ResultsIn total, 346 individuals completed the survey, of which 336 reported drinking and were therefore analysed. After COVID-19 restrictions 23.2% of respondents reported an increased AUDIT score, and 60.1% a decreased score. AUDIT score change was positively correlated with change in depression (P < 0.01, r = 0.15), anxiety (P < 0.01, r = 0.15) and drinking to cope scores (P < 0.0001, r = 0.35). MLM revealed that higher AUDIT scores were associated with age, mental illness, lack of a garden, self-employed or furloughed individuals, a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis and smoking status.ConclusionsCOVID-19 restrictions decreased alcohol consumption for the majority of individuals in this study. However, a small proportion increased their consumption; this related to drinking to cope and increased depression and anxiety.

Journal article

Venkataraman A, Mansur A, Rizzo G, Bishop C, Lewis Y, Kocagoncu E, Lingford-Hughes A, Huiban M, Passchier J, Rowe J, Tsukada H, Brooks DJ, Martarello L, Comley RA, Chen L, Schwarz AJ, Hargreaves R, Gunn R, Rabiner E, Matthews PMet al., 2021, Widespread cell stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in early Alzheimer’s Disease, Publisher: MedRxiv

Cell stress and impaired oxidative phosphorylation are central to mechanisms of synaptic loss and neurodegeneration in the cellular pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We quantified the in vivo density of the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, the sigma 1 receptor (S1R) using [11C]SA4503 PET, as well as that of mitochondrial complex I (MC1) with [18F]BCPP-EF and the pre-synaptic vesicular protein SV2A with [11C]UCB-J in 12 patients with early AD and in 16 cognitively normal controls. We integrated these molecular measures with assessments of regional brain volumes and brain perfusion (CBF) measured with MRI arterial spin labelling. 8 AD patients were followed longitudinally to estimate rates of change with disease progression over 12-18 months. The AD patients showed widespread increases in S1R (≤ 27%) and regional decreases in MC1 (≥ -28%), SV2A (≥ -25%), brain volume (≥ -23%), and CBF (≥ -26%). [18F]BCPP-EF PET MC1 density (≥ -12%) and brain volumes (≥ -5%) were further reduced at follow up in brain regions consistent with the differences between AD patients and controls at baseline. Exploratory analyses showing associations of MC1, SV2A and S1R density with cognitive changes at baseline and longitudinally with AD, but not in controls, suggested a loss of metabolic functional reserve with disease. Our study thus provides novel in vivo evidence for widespread cellular stress and bioenergetic abnormalities in early AD and that they may be clinically meaningful.

Working paper

Herlinger K, Lingford-Hughes A, 2021, Opioid use disorder and the brain: a clinical perspective, ADDICTION, Vol: 117, Pages: 495-505, ISSN: 0965-2140

Journal article

Kouimtsidis C, Houghton B, Gage H, Notley C, Maskrey V, Clark A, Holland R, Lingford-Hughes A, Punukollu B, Touray M, Duka Tet al., 2021, A feasibility trial of an intervention in alcohol dependence for structured preparation before detoxification versus usual care: the SPADe trial results, PILOT AND FEASIBILITY STUDIES, Vol: 7

Journal article

Herlinger KE, Ling YY, Nestor LJ, Pannekoek J, Al Lababidi M, Ertl N, Vanelli F, Chhibbar P, Guerrero E, Canizares S, Akavarapu S, Munafo MR, Lingford-Hughes AR, Nutt DJ, Goldstone APet al., 2021, Comparison of monetary reward anticipation and negative emotional processing in obesity, ex-smokers and abstinent alcohol dependence., 44th Annual Meeting Research Society on Alcoholism / International Society for Behavioral Research on Alcoholism, Publisher: Wiley, Pages: 241A-241A, ISSN: 0145-6008

Introduction & Aims: Alterations in non-drug reward and negative emotional processing are reported in alcohol dependence. This might extend into abstinence, perpetuating relapse. These neurobehavioral endophenotypes may be shared in nicotine dependence and obesity. Our MRC funded Gut Hormones in Addiction (GHADD) study investigated whether acute intravenous infusions of appetitive gut hormones attenuated behavioural components of addiction in abstinent alcohol or nicotine dependence and obesity. This analysis compared non-drug reward and emotional processing between groups at saline visit. Methods: The adult groups studied were: (i) obesity with active dieting (OB, n=25, mean BMI 37.1kg/m2, never smoked, no alcohol use disorder), (ii) ex-smokers (ExS, n=25, BMI 25.3kg/m2, median abstinence 20.7 weeks, no alcohol use disorder), (iii) abstinent alcohol-dependence (AAD, n=26, BMI 25.7kg/m2, abstinence 32.6 weeks , 42% ex-smokers, 46% current smokers), and (iv) healthy controls (HC, n=24, BMI 22.0 kg/m2, single non-infusion visit). Primary outcome measures included fMRI BOLD signal for: (i) win>neutral anticipation during Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MID); (ii) aversive>neutral pictures during Evocative Images Task (EIT) (Paterson et al., 2015). Results: The 3 clinical groups did not differ significantly in age, sex, or years of education; however, the HC were younger (P<0.001). For the MID task, in whole brain analysis of win anticipation (ANOVA, cluster-wise FWE Z>2.6, P<0.05), the AAD group had: lower BOLD signal than HC group in caudate, putamen, supplementary motor area, post-central gyrus, pre-central gyrus, lateral occipital cortex, and superior parietal lobule, lower BOLD signal than ExS in caudate and lateral occipital cortex, but no difference in BOLD signal than OB group; with ExS and OB groups having lower BOLD signal than HC in all regions, apart from caudate for ExS. Age had no effect on BOLD signal in the 3 clinical groups. For the EI

Conference paper

Paterson LM, McGonigle J, Murphy A, Giribaldi B, Elliott R, Ersche KD, Flechais R, Orban C, Smith DG, Suckling J, Taylor EM, Deakin JFW, Robbins TW, Nutt DJ, Lingford-Hughes ARet al., 2021, INVESTIGATING NEURAL CORRELATES OF SUBSTANCE DEPENDENCE AND THEIR PHARMACOLOGICAL MODULATION; NEW AVENUES TO TREATMENT AND PREDICTORS OF RELAPSE, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 20A-20A, ISSN: 0145-6008

Conference paper

Palmer EOC, Ward G, Mota B, Tyacke R, Nutt D, Lingford-Hughes A, Ward R, Sastre Met al., 2021, ALCOHOL HANGOVER INDUCES INCREASED NEUROINFLAMMATORY RESPONSE IN A RODENT MODEL, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 202A-203A, ISSN: 0145-6008

Conference paper

Goldstone AP, Ling YY, Nestor LJ, Pannekoek JN, Vanelli F, Herlinger K, Ertl N, Al-Lababidi M, Chhibbar P, Guerrero E, Akavarapu S, Canizares S, Munafo MR, Lingford-Hughes AR, Nutt DJet al., 2021, EFFECT OF ACUTE DESACYL GHRELIN ADMINISTRATION ON EATING AND ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOURS: THE GUT HORMONE IN ADDICTION STUDY, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 51A-51A, ISSN: 0145-6008

Conference paper

Fonville L, Paterson L, Herlinger K, Hayes A, Hill R, Nutt D, Lingford-Hughes Aet al., 2021, Functional evaluation of NK1 antagonism on cue reactivity in opiate dependence; an fMRI study, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol: 221, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 0376-8716

BackgroundOpiate addiction is a major health challenge with substantial societal cost. Though harm minimisation strategies have been effective, there is a growing need for new treatments for detoxification and relapse prevention. Preclinical research has found neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors have prominent effects on opiate reward and reinforcement, and human studies have found NK1 antagonism led to reductions in craving and withdrawal. However, its effect on brain mechanisms in opiate addiction has not yet been examined.MethodsThis study aims to assess the impact of NK1 antagonist aprepitant on heroin cue-elicited changes in blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal in opiate dependent individuals undergoing detoxification. Participants will attend two scanning sessions and receive a single dose of aprepitant (320 mg) and a placebo in a randomised, cross-over design. During functional magnetic resonance imaging participants will undergo two runs of a cue reactivity task, which consists of passive viewing of drug cues or neutral cues in a block design fashion. We hypothesise that NK1 antagonism will attenuate the BOLD response to drug cues in the caudate nucleus and amygdala. Regions of interest were selected based on NK1 receptor density and their role in cue reactivity and craving.

Journal article

Upthegrove R, de Cates A, Shuttleworth A, Tracy DK, Broome MR, Lingford-Hughes Aet al., 2021, Gender equality in academic publishing: action from the BJPsych, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 218, Pages: 128-130, ISSN: 0007-1250

Journal article

Herlinger K, Lingford-Hughes A, 2021, Addressing unmet needs in opiate dependence: providing better support for detoxification from OST and advances in relapse prevention, BJPsych Advances, Vol: 27, Pages: 362-372, ISSN: 2056-4678

Despite the record breaking levels of opiate related deaths published this year in the UK, pharmacological management of opioid dependence has evolved little since the advent of methadone in 1965. Along with harm minimisation and psychosocial interventions, the mainstay of pharmacological treatment remains opiate substitution therapy (OST) using methadone or buprenorphine, with many patients receiving OST for many years. Even with these treatments, opiate users continue to face mortality risks of 12 times higher than the general population, and emerging evidence suggests that patients who remain on long-term OST present with a range of physical and cognitive impairments. Therefore, with a growing ageing opiate dependent population who would benefit from detoxification from OST, this article will provide an overview of the current situation regarding opioid abuse and current clinical practice, will explore the reasons why availability and acceptability of detoxification pathways are declining, and will discuss emerging pharmacological therapies that could provide benefit in relapse prevention.

Journal article

Ashok AH, Myers J, Frost G, Turton S, Gunn RN, Passchier J, Colasanti A, Marques TR, Nutt D, Lingford-Hughes A, Howes OD, Rabiner EAet al., 2021, Acute acetate administration increases endogenous opioid levels in the human brain: A [C-11]carfentanil molecular imaging study, JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 35, Pages: 606-610, ISSN: 0269-8811

Journal article

McGinnity CJ, Barros DAR, Hinz R, Myers JF, Yaakub SN, Thyssen C, Heckemann RA, de Tisi J, Duncan JS, Sander JW, Lingford-Hughes A, Koepp MJ, Hammers Aet al., 2021, Alpha 5 subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors in temporal lobe epilepsy with normal MRI, Brain Communications, Vol: 3, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 2632-1297

GABAA receptors containing the α5 subunit mediate tonic inhibition and are widely expressed in the limbic system. In animals, activation of α5-containing receptors impairs hippocampus-dependent memory. Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with memory impairments related to neuron loss and other changes. The less selective PET ligand [11C]flumazenil has revealed reductions in GABAA receptors. The hypothesis that α5 subunit receptor alterations are present in temporal lobe epilepsy and could contribute to impaired memory is untested. We compared α5 subunit availability between individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy and normal structural MRI (‘MRI-negative’) and healthy controls, and interrogated the relationship between α5 subunit availability and episodic memory performance, in a cross-sectional study. Twenty-three healthy male controls (median ± interquartile age 49 ± 13 years) and 11 individuals with MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy (seven males; 40 ± 8) had a 90-min PET scan after bolus injection of [11C]Ro15-4513, with arterial blood sampling and metabolite correction. All those with epilepsy and six controls completed the Adult Memory and Information Processing Battery on the scanning day. ‘Bandpass’ exponential spectral analyses were used to calculate volumes of distribution separately for the fast component [VF; dominated by signal from α1 (α2, α3)-containing receptors] and the slow component (VS; dominated by signal from α5-containing receptors). We made voxel-by-voxel comparisons between: the epilepsy and control groups; each individual case versus the controls. We obtained parametric maps of VF and VS measures from a single bolus injection of [11C]Ro15-4513. The epilepsy group had higher VS in anterior medial and lateral aspects of the temporal lobes, the anterior cingulate gyri, the presumed area tempestas (piriform cort

Journal article

Turton S, Lingford-Hughes A, 2020, Neurobiology and principles of addiction and tolerance, Medicine (United Kingdom), Vol: 48, Pages: 749-753, ISSN: 1357-3039

Substances of abuse dysregulate key brain systems involved in motivation, reward, decision-making and memory. As drug use evolves into a compulsive addiction, there are adaptations in these systems, mediated by a number of different neurotransmitters. The mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway plays a central role in the pleasurable and positive reinforcing effects of drugs. As an individual becomes addicted, there is a shift away from this positive reinforcement to the compulsive, habitual drug-seeking behaviours driven, for example, by cravings or withdrawal symptoms. Although the potential for addiction is common with all drugs of abuse, the underlying mechanisms, neurotransmission systems and adaptations vary between drugs. This review focuses on the neurobiology of addiction and tolerance for alcohol, benzodiazepines, opioids and stimulants.

Journal article

Cheng H-Y, McGuinness LA, Elbers RG, MacArthur GJ, Taylor A, McAleenan A, Dawson S, Lopez-Lopez JA, Higgins JPT, Cowlishaw S, Lingford-Hughes A, Hickman M, Kessler Det al., 2020, Treatment interventions to maintain abstinence from alcohol in primary care: systematic review and network meta-analysis, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 371, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Orban C, McGonigle J, Flechais RSA, Paterson LM, Elliott R, Erritzoe D, Ersche KD, Murphy A, Nestor LJ, Passetti F, Reed LJ, Ribeiro AS, Smith DG, Suckling J, Taylor EM, Waldman AD, Wing VC, Deakin JFW, Robbins TW, Nutt DJ, Lingford-Hughes ARet al., 2020, Chronic alcohol exposure differentially modulates structural and functional properties of amygdala: A cross-sectional study, ADDICTION BIOLOGY, Vol: 26, ISSN: 1355-6215

Journal article

Herlinger K, Ling YY, Nestor LJ, Pannekoek JN, Al Lababidi M, Ertl N, Vanelli F, Chhibbar P, Guerrero E, Canizares S, Akavarapu S, Munafo MR, Lingford-Hughes AR, Nutt DJ, Goldstone APet al., 2020, Comparison of food cue reactivity, eating behaviours, mood and impulsivity in obesity, ex-smokers and abstinent alcohol dependence, 33rd Congress of the European-College-of-Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), Publisher: ELSEVIER, Pages: S15-S15, ISSN: 0924-977X

Conference paper

Hayes A, Herlinger K, Paterson L, Lingford-Hughes Aet al., 2020, The neurobiology of substance use and addiction: evidence from neuroimaging and relevance to treatment, BJPsych Advances, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2056-4678

Addiction is a global health problem with a chronic relapsing nature for which there are few treatment options. In the past few decades, neuroimaging has allowed us to better understand the neurobiology of addiction. Functional neuroimaging paradigms have been developed to probe the neural circuits underlying addiction, including reward, inhibitory control, stress, emotional processing and learning/memory networks. Functional neuroimaging has also been used to provide biological support for the benefits of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions, although evidence remains limited and often inconclusive in this area, which may contribute to the variability in treatment efficacy. In this article, we discuss the changing definitions and clinical criteria that describe and classify addictive disorders. Using examples from functional neuroimaging studies we summarise the neurobiological mechanisms that underpin drug use, dependence, tolerance, withdrawal and relapse. We discuss the links between functional neuroimaging and treatment, outline clinical management in the UK and give an overview of future directions in research and addiction services.

Journal article

Venkataraman A, Turton S, Lingford-Hughes A, 2020, Drug use and associated neuropsychiatric conditions, Oxford Textbook of Neuropsychiatry, Publisher: Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198757139

The book meets curriculum requirements for various international training programmes and examinations, and serves as an essential training text book for all psychiatric and neurology trainees worldwide.

Book chapter

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