Imperial College London

Prof Benjamin Barratt

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Professor in Environmental Exposures and Public Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2409b.barratt Website

 
 
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Location

 

UREN.1023Building E - Sir Michael UrenWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

114 results found

Piggin M, Alvarado Cruz L, Hargreaves D, Barratt B, Saglani S, Ivie S, Asantewa-Sechereh N, Cunnington Aet al., 2024, Online public involvement session on early life respiratory infections and their impact on lung age

Report

Zapata R, Douglas P, Chan KLA, Barratt B, Wright SLet al., 2024, Microplastic emissions via air and compost from an industrial composting facility in England, Environmental Pollutants and Bioavailability, Vol: 36, ISSN: 2639-5932

Composting provides a sustainable method of processing biodegradable waste but is often contaminated with plastic. We quantified and characterised microplastics in air and compost samples from an industrial aerobic green waste composting facility in England. Compost samples were taken at different stages of the process; air samples were taken onsite, upwind, and downwind. Microplastics were found in compost from all stages of the process at levels comparable to those reported for marine sediments; higher concentrations were found in the screening stages of the composting process (mean 9.0 (IQR: 7.1) and 9.0 (IQR: 7.4) MPs 5 g-1 (dw), for 30 mm and 10 mm screened material, respectively). Airborne microplastics were found onsite (32–49 MP m−3), upwind (1 MP m−3) and downwind (3 MP m−3). Composting facilities represent a potential source of microplastics and point of entry to the wider environment. Further investigation into other sites and processes is warranted.

Journal article

Lim S, Said B, Zurba L, Mosler G, Addo-Yobo E, Adeyeye OO, Arhin B, Evangelopoulos D, Fapohunda VT, Fortune F, Griffiths CJ, Hlophe S, Kasekete M, Lowther S, Masekela R, Mkutumula E, Mmbaga BT, Mujuru HA, Nantanda R, Mzati Nkhalamba L, Ngocho JS, Ojo OT, Owusu SK, Shaibu S, Ticklay I, Grigg J, Barratt Bet al., 2024, Characterising sources of PM2·5 exposure for school children with asthma: a personal exposure study across six cities in sub-Saharan Africa., Lancet Child Adolesc Health, Vol: 8, Pages: 17-27

BACKGROUND: Air pollution is the second largest risk to health in Africa, and children with asthma are particularly susceptible to its effects. Yet, there is a scarcity of air pollution exposure data from cities in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to identify potential exposure reduction strategies for school children with asthma living in urban areas in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: This personal exposure study was part of the Achieving Control of Asthma in Children in Africa (ACACIA) project. Personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) was monitored in school children in six cities in sub-Saharan Africa (Blantyre, Malawi; Durban, South Africa; Harare, Zimbabwe; Kumasi, Ghana; Lagos, Nigeria; and Moshi, Tanzania). Participants were selected if they were aged 12-16 years and had symptoms of asthma. Monitoring was conducted between June 21, and Nov 26, 2021, from Monday morning (approximately 1000 h) to Friday morning (approximately 1000 h), by use of a bespoke backpack with a small air pollution monitoring unit with an inbuilt Global Positioning System (GPS) data logger. Children filled in a questionnaire detailing potential sources of air pollution during monitoring and exposures were tagged into three different microenvironments (school, commute, and home) with GPS coordinates. Mixed-effects models were used to identify the most important determinants of children's PM2·5 (PM <2·5 μm in diameter) exposure. FINDINGS: 330 children were recruited across 43 schools; of these, 297 had valid monitoring data, and 1109 days of valid data were analysed. Only 227 (20%) of 1109 days monitored were lower than the current WHO 24 h PM2·5 exposure health guideline of 15 μg/m3. Children in Blantyre had the highest PM2·5 exposure (median 41·8 μg/m3), whereas children in Durban (16·0 μg/m3) and Kumasi (17·9 μg/m3) recorded the lowest exposures. Children had significantly higher PM2·5 exposures at school than at ho

Journal article

Bos B, Barratt B, Batalle D, Gale-Grant O, Hughes EJ, Beevers S, Cordero-Grande L, Price AN, Hutter J, V Hajnal J, Kelly FJ, Edwards D, Counsell SJet al., 2023, Prenatal exposure to air pollution is associated with structural changes in the neonatal brain, ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 174, ISSN: 0160-4120

Journal article

Chatzidiakou L, Krause A, Kellaway M, Han Y, Li Y, Martin E, Kelly FJ, Zhu T, Barratt B, Jones RLet al., 2022, Automated classification of time-activity-location patterns for improved estimation of personal exposure to air pollution, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, Vol: 21

Journal article

Zhang H, Fan Y, Han Y, Yan L, Zhou B, Chen W, Cai Y, Chan Q, Zhu T, Kelly FJ, Barratt B, AIRLESS Team Bet al., 2022, Partitioning indoor-generated and outdoor-generated PM<sub>2.5</sub> from real-time residential measurements in urban and peri-urban Beijing, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 845, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Delgado-Saborit JM, Lim S, Hickman A, Baker C, Barratt B, Cai X, Font A, Heal MR, Lin C, Thornes JE, Woods M, Green Det al., 2022, Factors affecting occupational black carbon exposure in enclosed railway stations, Atmospheric Environment, Vol: 289, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 1352-2310

Many rail services around the world continue to use diesel as the primary fuel source and enclosed railway stations have been identified as a possible hotspot for exposure to harmful diesel exhaust exposures. Little is known about the occupational exposure to air pollution for railway station workers due to their mobility around the station and variations in station design. A detailed understanding of the concentration of black carbon (BC), a diesel exhaust tracer, inside railway stations and the factors driving occupational exposures is required to minimize occupational exposure. Real-time personal exposure to BC was measured during 60 work-shifts encompassing different roles at three large enclosed railway stations of different design in London, Birmingham and Edinburgh (UK). Sampling was conducted by the train station workers over a period of 27 days between January 2017 to October 2018. Worker shift-mean BC exposures ranged 0.6–20.8 μg m−3 but 1-min peak exposures reached 773 μg m−3, with train dispatchers experiencing the highest BC exposures. Station design, job role, and frequency of diesel trains were the main drivers of occupational BC exposure. Elevated exposures for some station workers indicate that mitigation measures to reduce their exposure should be implemented to lower the risk of occupational health impacts. These could include improving ventilation and reducing engine emissions.

Journal article

Vu TV, Stewart GB, Kitwiroon N, Lim S, Barratt B, Kelly FJ, Thompson R, Smith RB, Toledano MB, Beevers SDet al., 2022, Assessing the contributions of outdoor and indoor sources to air quality in London homes of the SCAMP cohort, Building and Environment, Vol: 222, Pages: 1-8, ISSN: 0360-1323

Given that many people typically spend the majority of their time at home, accurate measurement and modelling of the home environment is critical in estimating their exposure to air pollution. This study investigates the fate and impact on human exposure of outdoor and indoor pollutants in London homes, using a combination of sensor measurements, outdoor air pollution estimated from the CMAQ-urban model and indoor mass balance models. Averaged indoor concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and NO2 were 14.6, 24.7 and 14.2 μg m−3 while the outdoor concentrations were 14.4, 22.6 and 21.4 μg m−3, respectively. Mean infiltration factors of particles (0.6–0.7) were higher than those of NO2 (0.4). In contrast, higher loss rates were found for NO2 (0.5–0.8 h−1) compared to those for particles (0.1–0.3 h−1). The average concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and NO2 in kitchen environments were 22.0, 33.7 and 20.8 μg m−3, with highest hourly concentrations (437, 644 and 136 μg m−3, respectively) during cooking times (6–7 pm). Indoor sources increased the indoor concentrations of particles and NO2 by an average of 26–37% in comparison to the indoor background level without indoor sources. Outdoor and indoor air exchange plays an important role in reducing air pollution indoors by 65–86% for particles and 42–65% for NO2.

Journal article

Lim S, Bassey E, Bos B, Makacha L, Varaden D, Arku RE, Baumgartner J, Brauer M, Ezzati M, Kelly FJ, Barratt Bet al., 2022, Comparing human exposure to fine particulate matter in low and high-income countries: A systematic review of studies measuring personal PM<sub>2.5</sub> exposure, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 833, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Suel E, Sorek-Hamer M, Moise I, Von Pohle M, Sahasrabhojanee A, Asanjan AA, Arku RE, Alli AS, Barratt B, Clark SN, Middel A, Deardorff E, Lingenfelter V, Oza NC, Yadav N, Ezzati M, Brauer Met al., 2022, What you see is what you breathe? Estimating air pollution spatial variation using street level imagery, Remote Sensing, Vol: 14, ISSN: 2072-4292

High spatial resolution information on urban air pollution levels is unavailable in many areas globally, partially due to high input data needs of existing estimation approaches. Here we introduce a computer vision method to estimate annual means for air pollution levels from street level images. We used annual mean estimates of NO2 and PM2.5 concentrations from locally calibrated models as labels from London, New York, and Vancouver to allow for compilation of a sufficiently large dataset (~250k images for each city). Our experimental setup is designed to quantify intra and intercity transferability of image-based model estimates. Performances were high and comparable to traditional land-use regression (LUR) and dispersion models when training and testing on images from the same city (R2 values between 0.51 and 0.95 when validated on data from ground monitoring stations). Like LUR models, transferability of models between cities in different geographies is more difficult. Specifically, transferability between the three cities i.e., London, New York, and Vancouver, which have similar pollution source profiles were moderately successful (R2 values between zero and 0.67). Comparatively, performances when transferring models trained on these cities with very different source profiles i.e., Accra in Ghana and Hong Kong were lower (R2 between zero and 0.21) suggesting the need for local calibration with local calibration using additional measurement data from cities that share similar source profiles.

Journal article

Dimakopoulou K, Samoli E, Analitis A, Schwartz J, Beevers S, Kitwiroon N, Beddows A, Barratt B, Rodopoulou S, Zafeiratou S, Gulliver J, Katsouyanni Ket al., 2022, Development and Evaluation of Spatio-Temporal Air Pollution Exposure Models and Their Combinations in the Greater London Area, UK, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 19

Journal article

Kenis A, Barratt B, 2022, The role of the media in staging air pollution: The controversy on extreme air pollution along Oxford Street and other debates on poor air quality in London, ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING C-POLITICS AND SPACE, Vol: 40, Pages: 611-628, ISSN: 2399-6544

Journal article

Lim S, Mudway I, Molden N, Holland J, Barratt Bet al., 2022, Identifying trends in ultrafine particle infiltration and carbon dioxide ventilation in 92 vehicle models, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 812, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Wang J, Alli AS, Clark S, Hughes A, Ezzati M, Beddows A, Vallarino J, Nimo J, Bedford-Moses J, Baah S, Owusu G, Agyemang E, Kelly F, Barratt B, Beevers S, Agyei-Mensah S, Baumgartner J, Brauer M, Arku REet al., 2022, Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO<sub>2</sub>) pollution in the Accra metropolis: Spatiotemporal patterns and the role of meteorology, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 803, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Morawska L, Zhu T, Liu N, Torkmahalleh MA, Andrade MDF, Barratt B, Broomandi P, Buonanno G, Belalcazar Ceron LC, Chen J, Cheng Y, Evans G, Gavidia M, Guo H, Hanigan I, Hu M, Jeong CH, Kelly F, Gallardo L, Kumar P, Lyu X, Mullins BJ, Nordstrom C, Pereira G, Querol X, Rojas Roa NY, Russell A, Thompson H, Wang H, Wang L, Wang T, Wierzbicka A, Xue T, Ye Cet al., 2021, The state of science on severe air pollution episodes: Quantitative and qualitative analysis, ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 156, ISSN: 0160-4120

Journal article

Lim S, Holliday L, Barratt B, Griffiths CJ, Mudway ISet al., 2021, Assessing the exposure and hazard of diesel exhaust in professional drivers: a review of the current state of knowledge, Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, Vol: 14, Pages: 1681-1695, ISSN: 1873-9318

It is well-established that traffic-related air pollution has a detrimental impact on health. Much of the focus has been on diesel exhaust emissions due to a rapid increase in vehicle numbers and studies finding that this pollutant is carcinogenic. Unsurprisingly, the highest diesel exposures that the general population experiences are during urban daily commutes; however, few studies have considered professional drivers who are chronically exposed to the pollutant due to their work in transport microenvironments. In this narrative review, we address the literature on professional drivers’ exposure to diesel exhaust and advocate that a modern exposure science approach utilised in commuter personal exposure studies is needed. This type of evaluation will provide a more detailed understanding of the time-activity of professional drivers’ exposures which is required to identify specific interventions to reduce their risk to diesel exhaust emissions.

Journal article

Varaden D, Leidland E, Lim S, Barratt Bet al., 2021, "I am an air quality scientist"- Using citizen science to characterise school children's exposure to air pollution, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 201, ISSN: 0013-9351

Journal article

Lim S, Barratt B, Holliday L, Griffiths CJ, Mudway Iet al., 2021, Characterising professional drivers’ exposure to traffic-related air pollution: Evidence for reduction strategies from in-vehicle personal exposure monitoring, Environment International, Vol: 153, ISSN: 0160-4120

Professional drivers working in congested urban areas are required to work near harmful traffic related pollutants for extended periods, representing a significant, but understudied occupational risk. This study collected personal black carbon (BC) exposures for 141 drivers across seven sectors in London. The aim of the study was to assess the magnitude and the primary determinants of their exposure, leading to the formulation of targeted exposure reduction strategies for the occupation. Each participant’s personal BC exposures were continuously measured using real-time monitors for 96 h, incorporating four shifts per participant. ‘At work’ BC exposures (3.1 ± 3.5 µg/m3) were 2.6 times higher compared to when ‘not at work’ (1.2 ± 0.7 µg/m3). Workers spent 19% of their time ‘at work driving’, however this activity contributed 36% of total BC exposure, highlighting the disproportionate effect driving had on their daily exposure. Taxi drivers experienced the highest BC exposures due to the time they spent working in congested central London, while emergency services had the lowest. Spikes in exposure were observed while driving and were at times greater than 100 µg/m3. The most significant determinants of drivers’ exposures were driving in tunnels, congestion, location, day of week and time of shift. Driving with closed windows significantly reduced exposures and is a simple behaviour change drivers could implement. Our results highlight strategies by which employers and local policy makers can reduce professional drivers’ exposure to traffic-related air pollution.

Journal article

Evangelopoulos D, Chatzidiakou L, Walton H, Katsouyanni K, Kelly FJ, Quint JK, Jones RL, Barratt Bet al., 2021, Personal exposure to air pollution and respiratory health of COPD patients in London, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 58, ISSN: 0903-1936

Previous studies have investigated the effects of air pollution on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients using either fixed site measurements or a limited number of personal measurements, usually for one pollutant and a short time period. These limitations may introduce bias and distort the epidemiological associations as they do not account for all the potential sources or the temporal variability of pollution.We used detailed information on individuals' exposure to various pollutants measured at fine spatio-temporal scale to obtain more reliable effect estimates. A panel of 115 patients was followed up for an average continuous period of 128 days carrying a personal monitor specifically designed for this project that measured temperature, PM10, PM2.5, NO2, NO, CO and O3 at one-minute time resolution. Each patient recorded daily information on respiratory symptoms and measured peak expiratory flow (PEF). A pulmonologist combined related data to define a binary variable denoting an "exacerbation". The exposure-response associations were assessed with mixed-effects models.We found that gaseous pollutants were associated with a deterioration in patients' health. We observed an increase of 16.4% (95% confidence interval: 8.6-24.6%), 9.4% (5.4-13.6%) and 7.6% (3.0-12.4%) in the odds of exacerbation for an interquartile range increase in NO2, NO and CO respectively. Similar results were obtained for cough and sputum. O3 was found to have adverse associations with PEF and breathlessness. No association was observed between particles and any outcome.Our findings suggest that, when considering total personal exposure to air pollutants, mainly the gaseous pollutants affect COPD patients' health.

Journal article

Liu NM, Miyashita L, Sanak M, Barratt B, Grigg Jet al., 2021, Prostaglandin E<sub>2</sub> and phagocytosis of inhaled particulate matter by airway macrophages in cystic fibrosis, JOURNAL OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS, Vol: 20, Pages: 673-677, ISSN: 1569-1993

Journal article

Alli AS, Clark S, Hughes AF, Nimo J, Bedford-Moses J, Baah S, Wang J, Vallarino J, Agyemang E, Barratt B, Beddows A, Kelly F, Owusu G, Baumgartner J, Brauer M, Ezzati M, Agyei-Mensah S, Arku REet al., 2021, Spatial-temporal patterns of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) pollution in Accra, Environmental Research Letters, Vol: 16, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 1748-9326

Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is rapidly urbanizing, and ambient air pollution has emerged as a major environmental health concern in SSA cities. Yet, effective air quality management is hindered by limited data. We deployed robust, low-cost and low-power devices in a large-scale measurement campaign and characterized within-city variations in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) pollution in Accra, Ghana. Methods: Between April 2019 and June 2020, we measured weekly gravimetric (filter-based) and minute-by-minute PM2.5 concentrations at 146 unique locations, comprising of 10 fixed (~1-year) and 136 rotating (7-day) sites covering a range of land-use and source influences. Filters were weighed for mass, and light absorbance (10−5m−1) of the filters was used as proxy for BC concentration. Year-long data at four fixed sites that were monitored in a previous study (2006-2007) were compared to assess change in PM2.5 concentrations. Results: The mean annual PM2.5 across the fixed sites ranged from 26 μg/m3 at a peri-urban site to 40 μg/m3 at commercial, business, and industrial (CBI) areas. CBI areas had the highest PM2.5 levels (mean: 37 μg/m3), followed by high-density residential neighborhoods (mean: 36 μg/m3), while peri-urban areas recorded the lowest (mean: 26 μg/m3). Both PM2.5 and BC levels were highest during the dry dusty Harmattan period (mean PM2.5: 89 μg/m3) compared to non-Harmattan season (mean PM2.5: 23 μg/m3). PM2.5 at all sites peaked at dawn and dusk, coinciding with morning and evening heavy traffic. We found about a ~50% reduction (71 vs 37 μg/m3) in mean annual PM2.5 concentrations when compared to measurements in 2006-2007 in Accra. Conclusion: Ambient PM2.5 concentrations in Accra may have plateaued at levels lower than those seen in large Asian megacities. However, levels are still 2- to 4-fold higher than the WHO guideline. Effective and equitable policies are needed to reduce pollution

Journal article

Varaden D, Barratt B, Heather K, Rushton Eet al., 2021, Engaging primary students with the issue of air pollution through citizen science: lessons to be learnt, Journal of Emergent Science

Journal article

Bos B, Lim S, Hedges M, Molden N, Boyle S, Mudway I, Barratt Bet al., 2021, Taxi drivers' exposure to black carbon and nitrogen dioxide in electric and diesel vehicles: A case study in London, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 195, ISSN: 0013-9351

Journal article

Zongbo S, Barratt B, Bloss W, Coe H, Doherty R, Fu P, Guan D, Grimmond S, Guo X, Hamilton J, Harrison R, He K, Heard D, Hewitt N, Lee J, Lewis A, Li J, Loh M, Jones R, Kalbrer M, Kelly F, Miller M, Monks P, Nemitz E, Palmer P, Reeves C, Longyi S, Shi Z, Shengui T, Wang X, Whalley L, Wild O, Wu Z, Zheng M, Zhang Q, Zhu Tet al., 2021, Atmospheric pollution and human health in a Chinese megacity (APHH-Beijing) programme, Atmospheric Pollution and Human Health in a Chinese Megacity (APHH-Beijing) Programme

In 2016, over 150 UK and Chinese scientists joined forces to understand the causes and impacts - emission sources, atmospheric processes and health effects - of air pollution in Beijing, with the ultimate aim of informing air pollution solutions and thus improving public health. The Atmospheric Pollution and Human Health in a Chinese Megacity (APHH-Beijing) research programme succeeded in delivering its ambitious objectives and significant additional science, through a large-scale, coordinated multidisciplinary collaboration. APHH-Beijing conducted the largest international air pollution field campaigns to date in Beijing in 2016 and 2017, generating new insight into air pollution characteristics using novel observational and modelling tools. The multi-faceted capabilities of the APHH-Beijing team addressed key policy-relevant air pollution challenges, such as the role of road traffic and long-range transport in influencing air quality, by combining approaches across disciplines, institutions and countries. To date, the APHH Beijing team has contributed to over 400 international peer-reviewed scientific journal papers including in multidisciplinary journals and 47 in the APHH-Beijing Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics / Atmospheric Measurement Techniques special Issue. More importantly, APHH-Beijing generated a range of scientific insights which can support the development of mitigation strategies to improve air quality and public health and reduce air quality inequality. In this report, we highlight some of the research outcomes that have potential implications for policymaking:

Report

Han Y, Chatzidiakou L, Yan L, Chen W, Zhang H, Krause A, Xue T, Chan Q, Liu J, Wu Y, Barratt B, Jones RL, Zhu T, Kelly FJet al., 2021, Difference in ambient-personal exposure to PM2.5 and its inflammatory effect in local residents in urban and peri-urban Beijing, China: results of the AIRLESS project, Faraday Discussions, Vol: 226, Pages: 569-583, ISSN: 1359-6640

Measurement of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is often used as a proxy of personal exposure in epidemiological studies. However, the difference between personal and ambient exposure, and whether it biases the estimates of health effects remain unknown. Based on an epidemiological study (AIRLESS) and simultaneously launched intensive monitoring campaigns (APHH), we quantified and compared the personal and ambient exposure to PM2.5 and the related health impact among residents in Beijing, China. In total, 123 urban and 128 peri-urban non-smoking participants were recruited from two well-established cohorts in Beijing. During winter 2016 and summer 2017, each participant was instructed to carry a validated personal air monitor (PAM) to measure PM2.5 concentration at high spatiotemporal resolution for seven consecutive days in each season. Multiple inflammatory biomarkers were measured, including exhaled NO, blood monocytes counts and C-reactive protein. Linear mixed-effect models were used for the associations between exposure and health outcomes with adjustment for confounders. The average level of daily personal exposure to PM2.5 was consistently lower than using corresponding ambient concentration, and the difference is greater during the winter. The personal to ambient (P/A) ratio of exposure to PM2.5 exhibited an exponentially declining trend, and showed larger variations when ambient PM2.5 levels < 25 μg m−3. Personal exposure to PM2.5 was significantly associated with the increase in respiratory and systemic inflammatory biomarkers; however, the associations were weaker or became insignificant when ambient concentrations were used. Exposure to ambient PM2.5 might not be a good proxy to estimate the health effect of exposure to personal PM2.5.

Journal article

Liu NM, Miyashita L, Maher BA, McPhail G, Jones CJP, Barratt B, Thangaratinam S, Karloukovski V, Ahmed IA, Aslam Z, Grigg Jet al., 2021, Evidence for the presence of air pollution nanoparticles in placental tissue cells, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 751, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Han Y, Chen W, Chatzidiakou L, Krause A, Yan L, Zhang H, Chan Q, Barratt B, Jones R, Liu J, Wu Y, Zhao M, Zhang J, Kelly FJ, Zhu Tet al., 2020, Effects of AIR pollution on cardiopuLmonary disEaSe in urban and peri-urban reSidents in Beijing: protocol for the AIRLESS study, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol: 20, Pages: 15775-15792, ISSN: 1680-7316

Beijing, as a representative megacity in China, is experiencing some of the most severe air pollution episodes in the world, and its fast urbanization has led to substantial urban and peri-urban disparities in both health status and air quality. Uncertainties remain regarding the possible causal links between individual air pollutants and health outcomes, with spatial comparative investigations of these links lacking, particularly in developing megacities. In light of this challenge, Effects of AIR pollution on cardiopuLmonary disEaSe in urban and peri-urban reSidents in Beijing (AIRLESS) was initiated, with the aim of addressing the complex issue of relating multi-pollutant exposure to cardiopulmonary outcomes. This paper presents the novel methodological framework employed in the project, namely (1) the deployment of two panel studies from established cohorts in urban and peri-urban Beijing, with different exposure settings regarding pollution levels and diverse sources; (2) the collection of detailed measurements and biomarkers of participants from a nested case (hypertensive) and control (healthy) study setting; (3) the assessment of indoor and personal exposure to multiple gaseous pollutants and particulate matter at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution with validated novel sensor technologies; (4) the assessment of ambient air pollution levels in a large-scale field campaign, particularly the chemical composition of particulate matter. Preliminary results showed that there is a large difference between ambient and personal air pollution levels, and the differences varied between seasons and locations. These large differences were reflected on the different health responses between the two panels.

Journal article

Analitis A, Barratt B, Green D, Beddows A, Samoli E, Schwartz J, Katsouyanni Ket al., 2020, Prediction of PM<sub>2.5</sub> concentrations at the locations of monitoring sites measuring PM<sub>10</sub> and NO<sub>x</sub>, using generalized additive models and machine learning methods: A case study in London, ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 240, ISSN: 1352-2310

Journal article

Floyd CN, Shahed F, Ukah F, McNeill K, O'Gallagher K, Mills CE, Evangelopoulos D, Lim S, Mudway I, Barratt B, Walton H, Webb AJet al., 2020, Acute blood pressure-lowering effects of nitrogen dioxide exposure from domestic gas cooking via elevation of plasma nitrite concentration in healthy individuals, Circulation Research, Vol: 127, Pages: 847-848, ISSN: 0009-7330

Journal article

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