Imperial College London

Bart Clarysse (visiting)

Business School

Chair in Entrepreneurship
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9850b.clarysse

 
 
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Location

 

389Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

90 results found

De Cuyper L, Clarysse B, Phillips N, 2020, Imprinting beyond the founding phase: how sedimented imprints develop over time, Organization Science, Vol: 33, Pages: 1579-1600, ISSN: 1047-7039

In this study, we go back to some of the fundamental ideas of Selznick and Stinchcombe about how organizations bear a lasting imprint of their founding context, and about how characteristics shaped during founding are coherently carried forward. To do so, we draw on an ethnography of a social venture where the entrepreneurs left soon after founding. In examining how an initial organizational imprint evolves beyond a venture’s founding phase, we focus on the actions and interactions of organizational members, the founders’ imprint, the venture’s new leadership and the external environment. The process model we develop shows how the organizational imprint evolves as a consequence of the interplay between top-down and bottom-up forces. We first find that the initial imprint is transmitted through a bottom-up mechanism of imprint reinforcement, and second, that the venture is re-imprinted after the founding period through two processes which we call imprint reforming and imprint coupling. The result of this is the formation of a sedimented imprint. Our findings further illuminate that although the initial imprint sticks, its function and manifestation changes over time.

Journal article

Boone S, Andries P, Clarysse B, 2020, Does team entrepreneurial passion matter for relationship conflict and team performance? On the importance of fit between passion focus and venture development stage, Journal of Business Venturing, Vol: 35, ISSN: 0883-9026

This study advances the literature on entrepreneurial passion, which struggles to explain when and how the experience of passion impacts venture-level performance, by shifting the focus to the team level and investigating the mechanisms and contingencies underlying this relationship. Drawing on identity control theory and the literature on new venture life cycle stages, we theorize and test that team entrepreneurial passion (TEP) affects new venture team performance via relationship conflict, and that this mechanism differs depending on whether the team’s passion focus is aligned with the venture’s development stage. Based on survey data and start-up competition scores from 86 new venture teams, we conclude that a prerequisite for a team to benefit from the experience of TEP, is that its passion focus at least reflects the entrepreneurial activities that are required for the specific development stage the venture operates in. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Journal article

De Cock R, Denoo L, Clarysse B, 2020, Surviving the emotional rollercoaster called entrepreneurship: The role of emotion regulation, Journal of Business Venturing, Vol: 35, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 0883-9026

The entrepreneurial journey is often experienced as an emotional rollercoaster, but we know very little about how entrepreneurs can ride it most effectively to increase their ventures' chances of survival. We investigate how entrepreneurs' habitual use of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression – two well-established types of emotion regulation – impact on the likelihood of their venture surviving. Drawing on a sample of 183 technology ventures, we find that both regulation types are generally associated with a lower survival likelihood, but that these effects depend on the venture's performance. Our study contributes to the literatures on emotions and new venture survival in entrepreneurship and to the emotion regulation literature.

Journal article

Yusubova A, Andries P, Clarysse B, 2019, The role of incubators in overcoming technology ventures' resource gaps at different development stages, R & D MANAGEMENT, Vol: 49, Pages: 803-818, ISSN: 0033-6807

Although incubation is considered important for overcoming resource challenges in technology ventures’ early life, there is a doubt about its relevance in later development stages, when the initial idea is commercialized and the venture tries to grow. Building on the resource‐based view of the firm and on a stage‐based perspective of venture development, this study argues that the resource gaps facing technology ventures differ between different development stages, and that the support provided by incubators therefore needs to be adapted to the venture’s development stage. We study the interaction between the iMinds incubator, located in Flanders, and eight technology ventures in its portfolio. In the Conception and Development stage, we observe resource gaps in terms of technical knowledge and access to end users, which the incubator addresses by offering direct technical support and access to its research and end user network. The subsequent Commercialization stage is dominated by business knowledge gaps, which the incubator amends through direct coaching and trainings. In the Growth stage, ventures typically lack the necessary team members, market players, and follow‐up financiers to grow their firm. The incubator addresses these resource gaps by providing access to its network. In all development stages, the incubator’s internal knowledge base, networking capabilities, and matching focus/selectivity are crucial in order for ventures to benefit from the incubator’s support. Our study suggests that these underlying capabilities can either be developed organically, or through the merger of different research institutes. Moreover, it points to the importance of local embeddedness for the geographical extension of these capabilities. These findings contribute to the literature on incubation and on venture development. They have important implications for policy makers, incubation managers, and entrepreneurs seeking incubation support.

Journal article

Bruneel J, Clarysse B, Autio E, 2018, The role of prior domestic experience and prior shared experience in young firm internationalization, INTERNATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS JOURNAL-RESEARCHING ENTREPRENEURSHIP, Vol: 36, Pages: 265-284, ISSN: 0266-2426

Journal article

Nikiforou AI, Zabara T, Clarysse B, Gruber Met al., 2018, THE ROLE OF TEAMS IN ACADEMIC SPIN-OFFS, ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVES, Vol: 32, Pages: 78-103, ISSN: 1558-9080

Journal article

Bruneel J, Spithoven A, Clarysse B, 2017, Interorganizational Trust and Technology Complexity: Evidence for New Technology-Based Firms, JOURNAL OF SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, Vol: 55, Pages: 256-274, ISSN: 0047-2778

Journal article

Pauwels C, Clarysse B, Wright M, Van Hove Jet al., 2016, Understanding a new generation incubation model: the accelerator, Technovation, Vol: 50-51, Pages: 13-24, ISSN: 0166-4972

Prior research hints at the accelerator as a new generation incubation model. Accelerators have become an umbrella term for any program providing a service structure of mentorship, networking opportunities and access to funding. The challenge, however, is to understand their distinctive characteristics and profiles geared towards reinforcing business start-ups. How do accelerators operate as a new generation incubation model and how do they differ from existing incubation mechanisms? This inductive study investigates 13 accelerators across Europe and adopts a design lens to identify the accelerator model’s key design parameters. We identify five key building blocks and distinguish between three different types of accelerators, taking the primary design theme of the accelerator into account. We contribute to the incubation literature by extending recognition of the heterogeneity of incubation models, by delineating the accelerator as a distinctive incubation model and by introducing the design lens as a useful theoretical framework to investigate incubation models and their evolution.

Journal article

Stevens R, Moray N, Bruneel J, Clarysse Bet al., 2015, Attention allocation to multiple goals: The case of for-profit social enterprises, STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Vol: 36, Pages: 1006-1016, ISSN: 0143-2095

Journal article

Cholakova M, Clarysse B, 2015, Does the Possibility to Make Equity Investments in Crowdfunding Projects Crowd Out Reward-Based Investments?, ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Vol: 39, Pages: 145-172, ISSN: 1042-2587

Journal article

Clarysse B, Wright M, Bruneel J, Mahajan Aet al., 2014, Creating value in ecosystems: Crossing the chasm between, knowledge and business ecosystems, Research Policy, Vol: 43, Pages: 1164-1176, ISSN: 0048-7333

Policy makers take initiatives to stimulate knowledge ecosystems in technology hotspots. It is implicitly assumed that these ecosystems will lead to value networks through which the participating companies can realize a competitive advantage. Value networks refer to business ecosystems where the value proposition is offered by a group of companies which are mutually complementary. The strategy literature suggests that business ecosystems lead to competitive advantages for each of the partners in the ecosystem. Based on a unique hand-collected database of 138 innovative start-ups in the region of Flanders, we analyze the knowledge and business ecosystem and the financial support network. We find that the knowledge ecosystem is well structured and concentrated around a number of central actors while the business ecosystem is almost non-existent at the local level. Further, we find that the financial support network is almost 100% publicly backed and fails to bridge the knowledge and business ecosystem. The implications for policy makers who tend to focus on the development of local ecosystems are discussed.

Journal article

Knockaert M, Spithoven A, Clarysse B, 2014, The impact of technology intermediaries on firm cognitive capacity additionality, TECHNOLOGICAL FORECASTING AND SOCIAL CHANGE, Vol: 81, Pages: 376-387, ISSN: 0040-1625

Journal article

Clarysse B, Bobelyn A, Aguirre IDP, 2013, Learning from own and others' previous experience: the contribution of the venture capital firm to the likelihood of a portfolio company's trade sale, SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMICS, Vol: 40, Pages: 575-590, ISSN: 0921-898X

Journal article

Mosey S, Wright M, Clarysse B, 2012, Transforming traditional university structures for the knowledge economy through multidisciplinary institutes, CAMBRIDGE JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS, Vol: 36, Pages: 587-607, ISSN: 0309-166X

Journal article

Bruneel J, Ratinho T, Clarysse B, Groen Aet al., 2012, The Evolution of Business Incubators: Comparing demand and supply of business incubation services across different incubator generations, Technovation, Vol: 32, Pages: 110-121

Journal article

Bruneel J, Van de Velde E, Clarysse B, Gemmel Pet al., 2012, Improving the success of radical innovation projects within established firms: engaging employees across different hierarchal levels, TECHNOLOGY ANALYSIS & STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT, Vol: 24, Pages: 951-965, ISSN: 0953-7325

Journal article

Wright M, Clarysse B, Mosey S, 2012, Strategic entrepreneurship, resource orchestration and growing spin-offs from universities, TECHNOLOGY ANALYSIS & STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT, Vol: 24, Pages: 911-927, ISSN: 0953-7325

Journal article

Bruneel J, Van de Velde E, Clarysse B, 2012, Impact of the Type of Corporate Spin-off on Growth, Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

Journal article

Clarysse B, Tartari V, Salter A, 2011, The Impact of Entrepreneurial Capacity, Experience and Organisational Support on Academic Entrepreneurship, Research Policy

Journal article

Clarysse B, Tartari V, Salter A, 2011, The impact of entrepreneurial capacity, experience and organizational support on academic entrepreneurship, RESEARCH POLICY, Vol: 40, Pages: 1084-1093, ISSN: 0048-7333

Journal article

Knockaert M, Ucbasaran D, Wright M, Clarysse Bet al., 2011, The Relationship Between Knowledge Transfer, Top Management Team Composition, and Performance: The Case of Science-Based Entrepreneurial Firms, ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Vol: 35, Pages: 777-803, ISSN: 1042-2587

Journal article

Clarysse B, Bruneel J, Wright M, 2011, EXPLAINING GROWTH PATHS OF YOUNG TECHNOLOGY-BASED FIRMS: STRUCTURING RESOURCE PORTFOLIOS IN DIFFERENT COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENTS, STRATEGIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP JOURNAL, Vol: 5, Pages: 137-157, ISSN: 1932-4391

Journal article

Kiefer S, Clarysse B, 2011, The Smart Entrepreneur: How to Build for a Successful Business, London, Publisher: Elliott & Thompson, ISBN: 9781904027881

More people than ever are becoming entrepreneurs, but the perils of starting a new business are well-documented. The Smart Entrepreneur teaches you how to avoid typical pitfalls and make your business a success by guiding you through the crucial decisions you need to make after your ‘eureka’ moment of inspiration. The Smart Entrepreneur uses a combination of real-life business experiences and state-of-the-art academic research, distilled into an accessible how-to book specifically targeted at start-ups. Especially useful for innovative and ambitious start-ups often requiring a great deal of effort and capital expenditure just to get to the testing phase – The Smart Entrepreneur offers a cutting-edge approach to enable entrepreneurs to rigorously test and improve their business idea before committing all their capital. It is a book of immense value to shape creative and innovative business ideas that carry a great deal of risk.

Book

Clarysse B, Wright M, Van de Velde E, 2011, Entrepreneurial Origin, Technological Knowledge and the Growth of Spin-off Companies, Journal of Management Studies

Journal article

Spithoven A, Clarysse B, Knockaert M, 2011, Building absorptive capacity to organise inbound open innovation in traditional industries, 19th ISPIM Annual Conference, Publisher: ELSEVIER, Pages: 10-21, ISSN: 0166-4972

Conference paper

Clarysse B, Bruneel J, Wright M, 2011, Growth, Value Creation and Resources in Young High Growth Technology Based Firms: The Impact of Environmental Contingencies, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal

Journal article

CLARYSSE B, WRIGHT M, VANDEVELDE E, 2010, Entrepreneurial Origin, Technological Knowledge and the Growth of Spin-off Companies

We contribute to the literature on corporate spin-offs and university spin-offs byexploring how different characteristics in the technological knowledge base at start-upinfluence spin-off performance. We investigate how the technological knowledgecharacteristics endowed at start-up predict growth, taking into account whether theknowledge / technology is transferred from a corporation or university. We use anovel, hand-collected dataset involving 48 corporate and 73 university spin-offs,comprising the population of spin-offs in Flanders during 1991-2002. We findcorporate spin-offs grow most if they start with a specific narrow-focused technologysufficiently distinct from the technical knowledge base of the parent company andwhich is tacit. University spin-offs benefit from a broad technology which istransferred to the spin-off. Novelty of the technical knowledge does not play a role incorporate spin-offs, but has a negative impact in university spin-offs unlessuniversities have an experienced technology transfer office to support the spin-off.

Working paper

Knockaert M, Wright M, Clarysse B, Lockett Aet al., 2010, Agency and similarity effects and the VC's attitude towards academic spin-out investing, JOURNAL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, Vol: 35, Pages: 567-584, ISSN: 0892-9912

Journal article

Knockaert M, Wright M, Clarysse B, Lockett Aet al., 2010, Agency and similarity effects and the VC’s attitude towards academic spin-out investing, The Journal of Technology Transfer, Vol: 35, Pages: 567-584

Journal article

Knockaert M, Clarysse B, Wright M, 2010, The extent and nature of heterogeneity of venture capital selection behaviour in new technology-based firms, R & D MANAGEMENT, Vol: 40, Pages: 357-371, ISSN: 0033-6807

Journal article

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