Imperial College London

Dr Benjamin Mullish

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

NIHR Clinical Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

b.mullish

 
 
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Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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224 results found

Forlano R, Mullish BH, Roberts LA, Thursz MR, Manousou Pet al., 2022, The Intestinal Barrier and Its Dysfunction in Patients with Metabolic Diseases and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol: 23, Pages: 662-662

<jats:p>Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents an increasing cause of liver disease worldwide, mirroring the epidemics of obesity and metabolic syndrome. As there are still no licensed medications for treating the disease, there is an ongoing effort to elucidate the pathophysiology and to discover new treatment pathways. An increasing body of evidence has demonstrated a crosstalk between the gut and the liver, which plays a crucial role in the development and progression of liver disease. Among other intestinal factors, gut permeability represents an interesting factor at the interface of the gut–liver axis. In this narrative review, we summarise the evidence from human studies showing the association between increased gut permeability and NAFLD, as well as with type-2 diabetes and obesity. We also discuss the manipulation of the gut permeability as a potential therapeutical target in patients with NAFLD.</jats:p>

Journal article

Biliński J, Winter K, Jasiński M, Szczęś A, Bilinska N, Mullish BH, Małecka-Panas E, Basak GWet al., 2022, Rapid resolution of COVID-19 after faecal microbiota transplantation., Gut, Vol: 71, Pages: 230-232

Journal article

Lythgoe MP, Ghani R, Mullish BH, Marchesi JR, Krell Jet al., 2022, The potential of fecal microbiota transplantation in oncology, Trends in Microbiology, Vol: 30, Pages: 10-12, ISSN: 0966-842X

Journal article

Smith PJ, 2022, GI highlights from the literature, Gut, Vol: 71, Pages: 210-211, ISSN: 0017-5749

Journal article

Nathwani R, Kockerling D, Mullish BH, Cole A, Lemoine M, Antoniades CG, Thursz MR, Dhar Aet al., 2022, Non-selective beta-blocker use in cirrhosis: the additional benefit in preventing secondary infections, Frontline Gastroenterology, Vol: 13, Pages: 86-88, ISSN: 2041-4137

Journal article

Radhakrishnan ST, Alexander JL, Mullish BH, Gallagher KI, Powell N, Hicks LC, Hart AL, Li JV, Marchesi JR, Williams HRTet al., 2022, Systematic review: the association between the gut microbiota and medical therapies in inflammatory bowel disease, Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Vol: 55, Pages: 26-48, ISSN: 0269-2813

Journal article

Forlano R, Mullish BH, Dhar A, Goldin RD, Thursz M, Manousou Pet al., 2021, Liver function tests and metabolic-associated fatty liver disease: Changes in upper normal limits, does it really matter?, World Journal of Hepatology, Vol: 13, Pages: 2104-2112, ISSN: 1948-5182

Journal article

Michael DR, Davies TS, Jack AA, Masetti G, Marchesi JR, Wang D, Mullish BH, Plummer SFet al., 2021, Daily supplementation with the Lab4P probiotic consortium induces significant weight loss in overweight adults, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>This 9-month randomised, parallel, double-blind, single-centre, placebo-controlled study (PROBE, ISRCTN18030882) assessed the impact of probiotic supplementation on bodyweight. Seventy overweight Bulgarian participants aged 45–65 years with BMI 25–29.9 kg/m<jats:sup>2</jats:sup> received a daily dose of the Lab4P probiotic comprising lactobacilli and bifidobacteria (50 billion cfu/day). Participants maintained their normal diet and lifestyle over the duration of the study. The primary outcome was change from baseline in body weight and secondary outcomes included changes in waist circumference, hip circumference and blood pressure. A significant between group decrease in body weight (3.16 kg, 95% CI 3.94, 2.38, <jats:italic>p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.0001) was detected favouring the probiotic group. Supplementation also resulted in significant between group decreases in waist circumference (2.58 cm, 95% CI 3.23, 1.94, <jats:italic>p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.0001) and hip circumference (2.66 cm, 95% CI 3.28, 2.05, <jats:italic>p</jats:italic> &lt; 0.0001) but no changes in blood pressure were observed. These findings support the outcomes of a previous shorter-term Lab4P intervention study in overweight and obese participants (PROMAGEN, ISRCTN12562026). We conclude that Lab4P has consistent weight modulation capability in free-living overweight adults.</jats:p>

Journal article

Biliński J, Jasiński M, Tomaszewska A, Lis K, Kacprzyk P, Chmielewska L, KarakulskaPrystupiuk E, Mullish BH, Basak GWet al., 2021, Fecal microbiota transplantation with ruxolitinib as a treatment modality for steroid‐refractory/dependent acute, gastrointestinal graft‐versus‐host disease: A case series, American Journal of Hematology, Vol: 96, ISSN: 0361-8609

Journal article

Monaghan TM, Duggal NA, Rosati E, Griffin R, Hughes J, Roach B, Yang DY, Wang C, Wong K, Saxinger L, Pučić-Baković M, Vučković F, Klicek F, Lauc G, Tighe P, Mullish BH, Blanco JM, McDonald JAK, Marchesi JR, Xue N, Dottorini T, Acharjee A, Franke A, Li Y, Wong GK-S, Polytarchou C, Yau TO, Christodoulou N, Hatziapostolou M, Wang M, Russell LA, Kao DHet al., 2021, A Multi-Factorial Observational Study on Sequential Fecal Microbiota Transplant in Patients with Medically Refractory Clostridioides difficile Infection, Cells, Vol: 10, Pages: 3234-3234

<jats:p>Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is highly effective in recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI); increasing evidence supports FMT in severe or fulminant Clostridioides difficile infection (SFCDI). However, the multifactorial mechanisms that underpin the efficacy of FMT are not fully understood. Systems biology approaches using high-throughput technologies may help with mechanistic dissection of host-microbial interactions. Here, we have undertaken a deep phenomics study on four adults receiving sequential FMT for SFCDI, in which we performed a longitudinal, integrative analysis of multiple host factors and intestinal microbiome changes. Stool samples were profiled for changes in gut microbiota and metabolites and blood samples for alterations in targeted epigenomic, metabonomic, glycomic, immune proteomic, immunophenotyping, immune functional assays, and T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoires, respectively. We characterised temporal trajectories in gut microbial and host immunometabolic data sets in three responders and one non-responder to sequential FMT. A total of 562 features were used for analysis, of which 78 features were identified, which differed between the responders and the non-responder. The observed dynamic phenotypic changes may potentially suggest immunosenescent signals in the non-responder and may help to underpin the mechanisms accompanying successful FMT, although our study is limited by a small sample size and significant heterogeneity in patient baseline characteristics. Our multi-omics integrative longitudinal analytical approach extends the knowledge regarding mechanisms of efficacy of FMT and highlights preliminary novel signatures, which should be validated in larger studies.</jats:p>

Journal article

Moore-Gillon C, Suleiman S, Mullish BH, Williams HRTet al., 2021, Faecal microbiota transplant in the treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection: an update, European Medical Journal Gastroenterology, Vol: 10, Pages: 60-68, ISSN: 2054-6203

Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) presents a major global healthcare challenge. Recurrent/refractory disease is particularly hard to manage, and novel therapeutic strategies have recently been adopted. In particular, within the past decade, faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) has rapidly progressed from a “potential” treatment option of fringe interest to one of the mainstays of therapy for recurrent/refractory C. difficile infection (rCDI). The first randomised study of its use for this indication was published as recently as 2013, but the emergence of subsequent randomised studies has led to its rapid adoption into guidelines and treatment algorithms. Very rare but serious reports of infection transmission from donor to recipient have resulted in ongoing refinements to donor screening, including the adoption of routine screening for intestinal carriage of multi-drug resistant bacteria and SARS-CoV-2 status. Developments in the evidence base have given new insights into optimal recipient selection and preparation. Upper and lower gastrointestinal administration of FMT slurry are both safe and effective in treating rCDI, although the newer option of capsulised FMT has recently grown in popularity; ‘next generation’ FMT products of defined microbial communities derived from donor stool are in late phase clinical trials, and may become licensed for use in the near future. While different regulatory structures for FMT use have been adopted in different countries, the development of international networks of FMT-interested specialists has helped to harmonise best practice.

Journal article

Smith PJ, 2021, GI highlights from the literature, Gut, Vol: 70, Pages: 2205-2206, ISSN: 0017-5749

Journal article

Ghani R, Mullish BH, Davies FJ, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, How to adapt an intestinal microbiota transplantation programme to reduce the risk of invasive multidrug-resistant infection, Clinical Microbiology and Infection, ISSN: 1198-743X

Journal article

Monaghan TM, Seekatz AM, Mullish BH, Moore-Gillon CCER, Dawson LF, Ahmed A, Kao D, Chan WCet al., 2021, Clostridioides difficile: innovations in target discovery and potential for therapeutic success., Expert Opin Ther Targets, Vol: 25, Pages: 949-963

INTRODUCTION: Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) remains a worldwide clinical problem. Increased incidence of primary infection, occurrence of hypertoxigenic ribotypes, and more frequent occurrence of drug resistant, recurrent, and non-hospital CDI, emphasizes the urgent unmet need of discovering new therapeutic targets. AREAS COVERED: We searched PubMed and Web of Science databases for articles identifying novel therapeutic targets or treatments for C. difficile from 2001 to 2021. We present an updated review on current preclinical efforts on designing inhibitory compounds against these drug targets and indicate how these could become the focus of future therapeutic approaches. We also evaluate the increasing exploitability of gut microbial-derived metabolites and host-derived therapeutics targeting VEGF-A, immune targets and pathways, ion transporters, and microRNAs as anti-C. difficile therapeutics, which have yet to reach clinical trials. Our review also highlights the therapeutic potential of re-purposing currently available agents . We conclude by considering translational hurdles and possible strategies to mitigate these problems. EXPERT OPINION: Considerable progress has been made in the development of new anti-CDI drug candidates. Nevertheless, a greater comprehension of CDI pathogenesis and host-microbe interactions is beginning to uncover potential novel therapeutic targets, which can be exploited to plug gaps in the CDI drug discovery pipeline.

Journal article

Forlano R, Harlow C, Mullish BH, Thursz MR, Manousou P, Yee Met al., 2021, Binge‐eating disorder is associated with an unfavorable body mass composition in patients with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease, International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol: 54, Pages: 2025-2030, ISSN: 0276-3478

Journal article

Tarazi M, Jamel S, Mullish BH, Markar SR, Hanna GBet al., 2021, Impact of gastrointestinal surgery upon the gut microbiome: A systematic review, Surgery, ISSN: 0039-6060

Journal article

Izzi-Engbeaya C, Forlano R, Mullish BH, Tan TM, Yee M, Manousou P, Dhillo TSet al., 2021, Outcomes of postmenopausal women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), Publisher: Bioscientifica

Conference paper

Baunwall SMD, Terveer EM, Dahlerup JF, Erikstrup C, Arkkila P, Vehreschild MJGT, Ianiro G, Gasbarrini A, Sokol H, Kump PK, Satokari R, De Looze D, Vermeire S, Nakov R, Brezina J, Helms M, Kjeldsen J, Rode AA, Kousgaard SJ, Alric L, Trang-Poisson C, Scanzi J, Link A, Stallmach A, Kupcinskas J, Johnsen PH, Garborg K, Rodríguez ES, Serrander L, Brummer RJ, Galpérine KT, Goldenberg SD, Mullish BH, Williams HRT, Iqbal TH, Ponsioen C, Kuijper EJ, Cammarota G, Keller JJ, Hvas CLet al., 2021, The use of Faecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) in Europe: A Europe-wide survey, The Lancet Regional Health - Europe, Vol: 9, Pages: 100181-100181, ISSN: 2666-7762

Journal article

Smith PJ, 2021, GI highlights from the literature, Gut, Vol: 70, Pages: 1795-1796, ISSN: 0017-5749

Journal article

Innes AJ, Mullish BH, Ghani R, Szydlo RM, Apperley JF, Olavarria E, Palanicawandar R, Kanfer EJ, Milojkovic D, McDonald JAK, Brannigan ET, Thursz MR, Williams HRT, Davies FJ, Marchesi JR, Pavlů Jet al., 2021, Fecal Microbiota Transplant Mitigates Adverse Outcomes Seen in Patients Colonized With Multidrug-Resistant Organisms Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, Vol: 11

<jats:p>The gut microbiome can be adversely affected by chemotherapy and antibiotics prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This affects graft success and increases susceptibility to multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) colonization and infection. We performed an initial retrospective analysis of our use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy donors as therapy for MDRO-colonized patients with hematological malignancy. FMT was performed on eight MDRO-colonized patients pre-HCT (FMT-MDRO group), and outcomes compared with 11 MDRO colonized HCT patients from the same period. At 12 months, survival was significantly higher in the FMT-MDRO group (70% <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 36% <jats:italic>p</jats:italic> = 0.044). Post-HCT, fewer FMT-MDRO patients required intensive care (0% <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 46%, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.045) or experienced fever (0.29 <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 0.11 days, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0.027). Intestinal MDRO decolonization occurred in 25% of FMT-MDRO patients <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 11% non-FMT MDRO patients. Despite the significant differences and statistically comparable patient/transplant characteristics, as the sample size was small, a matched-pair analysis between both groups to non-MDRO colonized control cohorts (2:1 matching) was performed. At 12 months, the MDRO group who did not have an FMT had significantly lower survival (36.4% <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 61.9% respectively, <jats:italic>p</jats:italic>=0.012), and higher non relapse mortality (NRM; 60.2% <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 16.7% respectively, <jats:italic>p</jats:italic>=0.009) than their paired non-MDRO-colonized cohort. Conversely, there was no difference in survival (70% <jats:italic>versus</jats:italic> 43.4%, <jats:ita

Journal article

Allegretti JR, Kelly CR, Grinspan A, Mullish BH, Hurtado J, Carrellas M, Marcus J, Marchesi JR, McDonald JAK, Gerardin Y, Silverstein M, Pechlivanis A, Barker GF, Miguens Blanco J, Alexander JL, Gallagher KI, Pettee W, Phelps E, Nemes S, Sagi SV, Bohm M, Kassam Z, Fischer Met al., 2021, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outcomes Following Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent C. difficile Infection, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol: 27, Pages: 1371-1378, ISSN: 1078-0998

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>Recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a clinical challenge. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a recurrent CDI therapy. Anecdotal concerns exist regarding worsening of IBD activity; however, prospective data among IBD patients are limited.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>Secondary analysis from an open-label, prospective, multicenter cohort study among IBD patients with 2 or more CDI episodes was performed. Participants underwent a single FMT by colonoscopy (250 mL, healthy universal donor). Secondary IBD-related outcomes included rate of de novo IBD flares, worsening IBD, and IBD improvement—all based on Mayo or Harvey-Bradshaw index (HBI) scores. Stool samples were collected for microbiome and targeted metabolomic profiling.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Fifty patients enrolled in the study, among which 15 had Crohn’s disease (mean HBI, 5.8 ± 3.4) and 35 had ulcerative colitis (mean partial Mayo score, 4.2 ± 2.1). Overall, 49 patients received treatment. Among the Crohn’s disease cohort, 73.3% (11 of 15) had IBD improvement, and 4 (26.6%) had no disease activity change. Among the ulcerative colitis cohort, 62% (22 of 34) had IBD improvement, 29.4% (11 of 34) had no change, and 4% (1 of 34) experienced a de novo flare. Alpha diversity significantly increased post-FMT, and ulcerative colitis patients became more similar to the donor than Crohn’s disease patients (P = 0.04).</jats:p>

Journal article

Monaghan TM, Biswas RN, Nashine RR, Joshi SS, Mullish BH, Seekatz AM, Blanco JM, McDonald JAK, Marchesi JR, Yau TO, Christodoulou N, Hatziapostolou M, Pucic-Bakovic M, Vuckovic F, Klicek F, Lauc G, Xue N, Dottorini T, Ambalkar S, Satav A, Polytarchou C, Acharjee A, Kashyap RSet al., 2021, Multiomics Profiling Reveals Signatures of Dysmetabolism in Urban Populations in Central India, Microorganisms, Vol: 9, Pages: 1485-1485

<jats:p>Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in India. Perturbation of host–microbiome interactions may be a key mechanism by which lifestyle-related risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity may influence metabolic health. There is an urgent need to identify relevant dysmetabolic traits for predicting risk of metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, among susceptible Asian Indians where NCDs are a growing epidemic. Methods: Here, we report the first in-depth phenotypic study in which we prospectively enrolled 218 adults from urban and rural areas of Central India and used multiomic profiling to identify relationships between microbial taxa and circulating biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk. Assays included fecal microbiota analysis by 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing, quantification of serum short chain fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and multiplex assaying of serum diabetic proteins, cytokines, chemokines, and multi-isotype antibodies. Sera was also analysed for N-glycans and immunoglobulin G Fc N-glycopeptides. Results: Multiple hallmarks of dysmetabolism were identified in urbanites and young overweight adults, the majority of whom did not have a known diagnosis of diabetes. Association analyses revealed several host–microbe and metabolic associations. Conclusions: Host–microbe and metabolic interactions are differentially shaped by body weight and geographic status in Central Indians. Further exploration of these links may help create a molecular-level map for estimating risk of developing metabolic disorders and designing early interventions.</jats:p>

Journal article

Habboub N, Manousou P, Forlano R, Mullish BH, Frost G, Challis B, Thursz MR, Dumas M-Eet al., 2021, Metabolic Profiling of NASH Patients and Healthy Controls to Investigate the Transferability of a Healthy Metabolome Using Faecal Microbiota Transplantation, Metabolomics 2021

Conference paper

Mullish BH, Ghani R, McDonald JAK, Davies F, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, Reply to Woodworth, et al., Clin Infect Dis, Vol: 72, Pages: e924-e925

Journal article

Smith PJ, 2021, GI highlights from the literature, Gut, Vol: 70, Pages: 1194-1195, ISSN: 0017-5749

Journal article

Miguens Blanco J, Liu Z, Mullish BH, Danckert NP, Alexander JL, Chrysostomou D, Sengupta R, McHugh N, McDonald JAK, Abraham SM, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, A Phenomic Characterization of the Gut Microbiota - Associations with Psoriatic Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis, World Microbe Forum

Conference paper

Barker GF, Pechlivanis A, Bello AT, Chrysostomou D, Mullish BH, Marchesi J, Posma JM, Kinross JM, Nicholson J, O'Keefe SJ, Li JVet al., 2021, Aa022 a high-fiber low-fat diet increases fecal levels of lithocholic acid derivative 3-ketocholanic acid, Digestive Disease Week, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S393-S394, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Mullish BH, Marchesi J, Pass DA, Michael D, Plummer S, Wang Det al., 2021, DAILY PROBIOTIC USE IS ASSOCIATED WITH A REDUCED RATE OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT SYMPTOMS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE PEOPLE, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S150-S150, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Mullish BH, Innes AJ, Ghani R, Szydlo R, Williams HR, Thursz MR, Marchesi J, Davies F, Pavlu Jet al., 2021, FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANT PRIOR TO ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANT IN PATIENTS COLONIZED WITH MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT ORGANISMS IS ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVED SURVIVAL, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S168-S169, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Allegretti JR, Mullish BH, Marchesi J, Kennedy K, Gerber G, Bry Let al., 2021, ASSOCIATION BETWEEN NOVEL METABOLOMIC BIOMARKERS AND C.DIFFICILE RECURRENCE, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S369-S369, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

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