Imperial College London

DR BEHDEEN ORAEE

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Visiting Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

b.oraee Website

 
 
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Location

 

Weeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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30 results found

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2020, Innovative regulatory and financial parameters for advancing carbon capture and storage technologies, Fordham Environmental Law Review, Vol: 32, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 1079-6657

In the post-industrial age, the realisation of inherent technical innovation potentials requires that stakeholders develop flexible, cooperation-based frameworks if first mover opportunities and advantages are to be realised. In the Paris Agreement5 implementation context, carbon capture and storage technologies have emerged as a complementary adjunct to climate change mitigation and a diversified energy mix. However, developing the technology is not without technical and financial risks. The challenge for key stakeholders, primarily (but not exclusively) government and industry counterparts is to develop mutually reinforcing strategies, regulations and policies for testing and commercialising Carbon Capture and Storage (“CCS”)technologies and networks, as that will be determinative of their fate. In the Paris Agreement implementation period, the UK, for example, has indicated a commitment to bold greenhouse gas reductions(57% by 2030),and investment in CCS, as part of the ambitious emissions reductions targets set forth by the European Union, the deployment of which is meant to count for 20% of the greenhouse gas emissions captured by 2030. This has subsequently resulted in plans for several pilot CCS plants on UK soil. The up-scaling of CCS to the demonstration level, however, is dependent not only on the presence of sufficient interest and funding –an ongoing issue in the UK both pre-and post-Brexit-but also on the existence of appropriate regulatory conditions and options for additional private financing by industrial stakeholders. Furthermore, it is important to note that the up-scaling of projects from pilot to demonstration, and further on to a commercial-scale, is materializing in the context of a global financial crisis and a dip in investment trust in high-risk ventures. The

Journal article

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2019, On the need for synergistic regulatory and financial parameters for carbon capture and storage technology, Transnational Environmental Law, ISSN: 2047-1025

In the post-industrial age, the realisation of inherent technical innovation potentials requires that stakeholders develop flexible, cooperation-based frameworks if first mover opportunities and advantages are to be realised. In this context, carbon capture and storage technologies have emerged as a complementary adjunct, to a diversified energy mix. However, developing the technology is not without technical and financial risks. The capacity of key stakeholders, primarily (but not exclusively) government and industry counterparts is to develop mutually reinforcing strategies and policies for testing and commercialising Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies, as that will be determinative of their fate.The UK in particular has indicated a commitment to bold greenhouse gas reductions, and investment in CCS, as part of the ambitious emissions reductions targets set forth by the European Union, the deployment of which is meant to count for 20% of the greenhouse gas emissions captured by 2030. This has subsequently resulted in plans for several pilot CCS plants on UK soil. The up-scaling of CCS to the demonstration level, however, is dependent not only on the presence of sufficient interest and funding – an ongoing issue in the UK - but also on the existence of appropriate regulatory conditions and options for additional private financing by industrial stakeholders. Furthermore, it is important to note that the up-scaling of projects from pilot to demonstration, and further on to a commercial-scale, is materializing in the context of a global financial crisis and a dip in investment trust in high-risk ventures. The development of CCS projects, in individual states, is not only influenced by national regulatory regimes, policy developments, and fluctuations in the financial markets, but is also dependant on the legislative signals given from supra-national bodies and binding international agreements. In Europe, the CCS Directive’s approach to long term

Journal article

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Zandi S, 2015, Evaluation of rock burst in deep coal mining by using forensic engineering, 34th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining, Publisher: ICGCM

Rock bursts remain an important problem in longwall coalmining. These bursts are due to a sudden and severe failure of rocksfrom a high stress concentration in deep underground excavationsthat occur with the instantaneous release of strain energy storedin the rocks. They can potentially cause irrecoverable damage toequipment and personnel, thus accurate rock burst prediction andcontrol is expected to be carried out by the mine design engineer.As a result, this can constitute major challenges for said engineer.In this paper, forensic engineering has been used to evaluatethe possibility and extent of rock bursts in deep coal mining.For this purpose, established mining engineering principles,including factors influencing the severity of rock bursts, have beenincorporated in the forensic engineering technique. The analysestook place in five steps:• Assessment of regional and local conditions prior to the event• Assessment of conditions after the event• Hypothesize plausible ways in which pre-event conditions canbecome post-event ones• Search for evidence that either denies or supportsvarious hypotheses• Apply engineering knowledge to relate the various factsand evidence into a cohesive scenario of how the event mayhave occurred.The paper concludes by demonstrating a method for predictingrock bursts and preventing their re-occurrence. The methodologyused in this paper, together with the results obtained, can serveas useful tools for the coal mine design engineer in the primaryevaluation of rock burst potential in underground coal mines.

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani, Someehneshin J, Oraee K, 2015, Analytical Model Determining the Optimal Block Size in the Block Caving Mining Method, Indian Geotechnical Journal, Vol: 45, Pages: 156-168, ISSN: 0046-8983

Nowadays along with population growth, industry development, consumption of mineral resources and the fact that the reserves on hand are running out, the depth of surface and underground mines for further exploitation are increasing. During recent years, in underground mining, the block caving method for low-grade and large-scale deposits has shown a growing rate of application. The dimensions of blocks are one of the most important parameters which should be taken into account since it has been proved to have a great deal of effect on technical issues such as commencement of caving and mine design. In this study, some assumptions were considered and having used these assumptions for estimation of optimized length and width of block, a relationship was explored. And finally, it was transformed into an inequality. Solving this inequality provides us with the optimized length and width of the block. The explored relationship was analysed using MATLAB and the resulting graphs thereof were drawn. Simulation was carried out using the Phase2 software and the results were compared with the different modes of the block. In the blocks that were 55, 60 and 65 m in length, the total displacement (the total displacement as a result of applying force in order to cave), yielded elements (percent) and Yielded Joints reached a satisfactory condition which enables perfect caving to occur. In addition, in the 70 m block, these values reached their maximum. It was concluded in this paper that the optimal block size is between 55m and 65m.

Journal article

Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2015, An assessment of CCS risk analysis mechanisms used by EU commission, European Energy and Environmental Law Review, Vol: 24, Pages: 35-41, ISSN: 0966-1646

Journal article

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Hosseini N, Eskandar H, Oraee Ket al., 2014, Risk analysis and risk ranking in tunneling: A case study, International Conference on Ground Control in Mining

Constructing tunnels underground is generally described as a high-risk activity owing to the fact that conditions in the surrounding area tend to be unpredictable. This would create unique dangers in every situation. It is important to gain a deep understanding of the risks associated with tunneling, in order to reduce the likelihood of their occurrence and severity of their consequences, should they occur. For this to be achieved, different risks should first be evaluated and ranked according to their relative importance and criticality. Amir Kabir tunnel is considered to be one of the most dangerous tunnels in Tehran, Iran in terms of the risks involved in its excavation and their potential consequences. In particular, part T4 of the tunnel passes through a zone of different strata and a compound of various soils.This paper studies part T4 of Amir Kabir tunnel from a risk analysis and risk management point of view. In doing so, factors increasing total cost of the project, causing delay in the project completion time, decreasing the operation rate and downgrading project quality were identified and ranked according to their importance, using the aggregate primary index risk method. For this purpose, a comprehensive questionnaire was designed and completed by experts within the field of tunneling. By responding to the questionnaires, the experts determined the relative likelihood of occurrence of the studied factors and their potential consequences. As a result, the experts suggested several alternatives to reduce the risks involved in this particular study. Moreover, the experts completed new questionnaires whilst taking into account different alternatives. In the next step, the risks before and after applying the alternatives were compared. As a result of performing the said analyses, it was concluded that firstly, the aggregate primary index risk is an effective tool in identifying the risks involved in such projects. Secondly, it was concluded that by taking in

Conference paper

Hosseini N, Goshtasbi K, Oraee-Mirzamani B, Gholinejad Met al., 2014, Calculation of periodic roof weighting interval in longwall mining using finite element method, ARABIAN JOURNAL OF GEOSCIENCES, Vol: 7, Pages: 1951-1956, ISSN: 1866-7511

Journal article

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Zandi S, Oraee K, 2014, Evaluation of Top Coal Yielding Potential in Longwall All Top Coal Caving Mining, 22nd MPES Conference, Publisher: Springer International Publishing, Pages: 143-149

Longwall Top Coal Caving (LTCC) is a method of extraction for underground mining of thick coal seams. This method, being a combined version of Longwall and Sublevel caving methods, has a higher output than a single longwall face. This is because coal is not only extracted by shearer loader but also produced by simultaneous caving of the remaining top coal behind the powered supports. Cavability is one of the most important parameters that control the applicability of the LTCC method. The correct understanding of the top coal failure mechanisms and caving characteristics are therefore the key factors for successful LTCC operation. In this paper, a yield criterion based on in-situ stress conditions and the Hoek-Brown rock failure criteria is developed. This criterion evaluates cavability by estimating yielding potential of the top part of the coal seam. The results of this research as well as the methodology adopted can serve as useful tools for a successful operation of the high output high recovery LTCC method.

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Cockerill T, Makuch Z, 2013, Risk Assessment and Management Associated with CCS, Energy Procedia, Vol: 37, Pages: 4757-4764, ISSN: 1876-6102

As things stand, there is currently no available commercial insurance for long-term liability of CCS projects. This makes investors shy away from such initiatives, even if the risk of the venture is assessed to be relatively small. A policy review was carried out to assess the risks involved in the CCS industry which identified uncertainties with regards to the risks associated with CCS that make policy making and insuring CCS projects very difficult. This paper presents a coherent understanding of the chain of events that could lead to major failures in a CCS project. This research project has looked into the potential risks involved in CO2 storage and the ways in which their criticality and importance as well as their probability and likelihood can potentially be calculated using Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) methods.

Journal article

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Cockerill T, Makuch Z, 2013, Environmental risk analysis and risk management techniques associated with CCS: A comparison between the FTA and AHP methods, UK Carbon Capture and Storage Research Centre (UKCCSRC) Early Career Researcher Annual Meeting: Research and Transitions to Commercialisation

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Cockerill T, Makuch Z, 2013, Environmental risk analysis and risk management techniques associated with CCS: A comparison between the FTA and AHP methods, UK Carbon Capture and Storage Research Centre (UKCCSRC) Early Career Researcher Annual Meeting: Research and Transitions to Commercialisation

Poster

Mehdi Dinmohammadpour M, Oraee-Mirzamani B, Oraee K, 2013, Numerical analysis and surface subsidence prediction of tunnes in urban areas, 23rd World Mining Congress

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Zandi S, Oraee K, 2013, A Comparison of Numerical Methods and Analytical Methods in Determination of Tunnel Walls Displacement – A Case Study, 32nd International Conference on Ground Control in Mining

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Zandi S, Oraee K, 2013, Suggesting the support system for a mining tunnel in E1 longwall panel of the Parvade 1 underground coal mine based on finite element method, 23rd World Mining Congress

Conference paper

Someehneshin J, Oraee-Mirzamani B, Oraee K, 2013, The optimal block size in Block Caving method, 23rd World Mining Congress

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Arfania S, Oraee K, 2013, A new method for vertical transportation of minerals in underground mines, 23rd World Mining Congress

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Hosseini N, Oraee K, 2012, The Evaluation of Empirical Coal Pillar Strength Formula Based On Uncertainty Criterion, 31st International Conference on Ground Control in Mining

Several empirical equations for estimation of coal pillar strength are presented in academic studies so far. The development processes of these equations are almost similar and are usually obtained by fitting the mathematical function (curve) on field data. One of the best criteria to evaluate the quality of fitting for such equations is the correlation coefficient, R2, which nevertheless has limited applicability. For calculating the correlation coefficient access to the initial data that the equation is presented by fitting on them is necessary; for many coal pillar strength formula it is impossible to conduct this. In this paper a new approach based on the analysis of uncertainty amplitude to compare the coal pillar strength formula are presented. This approach is based on a combination of parameters such as Mean Squared Error (MSE), Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), type of function and degree of freedom. Subsequently the confidence level of constants is formed and thus the correlation coefficient becomes more comprehensive. Therefore for an effective comparison the efficiency and accuracy of coal pillar strength formula can be used.

Conference paper

Makuch Z, Georgieva SZ, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2011, Carbon Capture and Storage Policy and Regulation Development – a Case for Learning by Doing?, UK Carbon Capture and Storage Community, University of Edinburgh

With a growing concern about the consequences of global climate change and an escalating need for the diversification and enhanced security of energy supply, the EU has taken on ambitious targets for the promotion of renewable energy and low-carbon technology. In this context, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is seen as a cost-efficient technology that has the possibility to be deployed and up-scaled in EU Member States in the near future. The EU has already granted a total of €1 billion to six CCS projects across Europe, however, despite this investment, there still remain significant regulatory barriers in the way of full-scale deployment of CCS.As of yet, no comprehensive international regulatory regime for CCS exists and legislation is purveyed via a patchwork of international (OSPAR and London Dumping Conventions) and European laws – the CCS, Emissions Trading and Environmental Liability Directives (See Figure 1). The UK is due to transpose the main (CCS) Directive on the 25th of June 2011 and as such faces the challenge of incorporating existing legislation in a way that is appropriate to the financial and regulatory environment of the United Kingdom. In order to achieve that, policymakers ought to consider some of the issues that stem from an overly strict interpretation of the CCS Directive in particular, and other carbon capture-related legislation in general. Of particular note should be the fact that the EU CCS Directive’s underlying regulatory approach places a high technical and financial risk burden on industry participation in CCS, featuring potentially uncapped and uncertain long term liability regulatory burdens. Specifically, there exists an obvious case of a “double-counting” event - capture operators are legally required to buy emissions credits in the event of a leak, however, storage operators are also bound to cover liability of the same leakage event. Thus, under the current EU directives, there arises a double pe

Poster

Cockerill T, Makuch Z, Oraee-Mirzamani B, Georgieva Set al., 2011, CCS Networks for the UK: Benefits, Impacts and Regulation, Newcastle, UK, International Forum on the Transportation of CO2 by Pipeline, Publisher: Newcastle University, Clarion Technical Conferences, Tiratsoo Technical

Conference paper

Zen Makuch, Slavina Z Georgieva, Behdeen Oraee-Mirzamani, 2011, Carbon Capture and Storage: Regulating Long Term Liability, Publisher: Imperial College London Press

Report

Hosseini N, Oraee K, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2011, The New Rock Failure Criterion for Coal Basin Rocks, International Conference on Ground Control In Mining

Conference paper

Oraee B, Hosseini N, Oraee K, Gholinejad Met al., 2011, Analyses of tunnel stability under dynamic loads, Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Annual Meeting & Exhibit and CMA 113th National Western Mining Conference "Shaping a Strong Future Through Mining", Publisher: Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration

Tunnels as any other structures are affected by different loads and stresses. Generally, the loads on tunnels consist of both static and dynamic loads. These loads must both be considered in the tunnel design process. In this paper, the stability state of Jiroft water-transform tunnel is evaluated. Firstly, the in-situ stresses and then using Kirsch’s equations the induced stresses due to static loads in walls and crown of tunnel are calculated. Consequently, the strain caused by probable earthquake without considering the interaction between the concrete lining of tunnel and rock mass using seismic analysis is calculated based on free-field deformation. When the strain is determined, the simplified method of closed-form solution, Wang equations and Penzien equations are used to calculate (estimate) the applied forces on the tunnel due to earthquake such as axial force and bending moment on a tunnel section taking into account the interaction of the tunnel concrete lining and rock mass. Results of this study show that the loads applied to the tunnel as a result of earthquake waves can be affect the stability of underground structures, especially long structures such as tunnels.

Conference paper

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2011, Carbon Capture and Storage Liability, Environmental and Energy Law, Editors: Makuch, Pereira, Wiley Blackwell Publishing, Makuch, Pereira, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Publishing

Book chapter

Makuch Z, Georgieva SZ, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2011, Carbon Capture and Storage Policy and Regulation Development – a Case for Learning by Doing?, Carbon Capture and Storage Community (CCSC), Publisher: Imperial College

Conference paper

Oraee B, Lashgari A, Sayadi AR, 2011, Estimation of capital and operation costs of backhoe loaders, Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Annual Meeting & Exhibit and CMA 113th National Western Mining Conference "Shaping a Strong Future Through Mining"

Adequate estimation of equipment costs is a key factor in feasibility study and evaluation of design alternatives of mining projects. In this paper, capital and operation costs of backhoe loaders are estimated using multiple linear regression (MLR), based on principle component analysis (PCA). These cost functions are consisted of five independent variables; bucket size, digging depth, dump height, weight and horse power. The MLR is conducted in two steps. At the first correlation between independent variables is omitted using PCA technique. Thereafter, MLR functions are established using selected significant PCs and total cost functions are constituted as functions of initial variables. At the end, accuracy of functions are evaluated using mean absolute error rate method.

Conference paper

Hosseini N, Oraee-Mirzamani B, Oraee K, 2011, Calculation of Periodic Roof Weighting Interval in Longwall Mining Using Finite Element Method, 30th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining, Publisher: ICGCM

The state of periodic loading and periodic roof weighting interval have an important role in geo-mechanical stability and hence continuity of operations in longwall method. In this paper, the mechanism of roof caving in longwall mining together with the effect of geometry and geo-mechanical properties of surrounding rock masses on the magnitude and timing of periodic loading are studied. For this purpose, a longwall mine is first modeled, using Phase2 software and then, by simulating the caving process in the roof, the periodic roof weighting intervals are calculated. Sensitivity analysis is then applied to determine the effect of changes in mechanical properties of rock mass, especially in the main roof and immediate roof as well as changes in the geometry of mine. Finally, comparison of the results between numerical modeling with other conventional methods, shows that the applied algorithm can effectively calculate the periodic roof weighting interval in longwall mining method. Also, due to the flexible nature of numerical modeling, reliable application of such approach can be envisaged in most mining conditions.

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, Tavassoli M, Oraee K, 2011, Designing shotcrete as primary support in tunnels, 30th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining, Publisher: International Conference on Ground Control in Mining

Since the advent of New Austrian Tunneling Method (NATM), shotcrete as primary means of support in tunnels has been widely applied. Its most important features are durability, speed of application and cost effectiveness. This paper introduces a table that provides guidelines for the thickness of shotcrete required in some common situations of mine roadways.In order to devise such table, two different arch sections together with three different overburden types were considered. Geotechnical parameters such as apparent cohesion and angle of internal friction of surrounding rocks were chosen, based on the five category classification of Bieniawski. Two K0 factors (the ratio of horizontal stress to vertical stress) and an average rock density were utilized. Using numerical methods, sixty models were then devised in this way.By applying interaction diagrams of axial force and the bending moment for different thicknesses of shotcrete, appropriate shotcrete thickness for these models were calculated. The results of this research as well as the methodology applied can be used in mining roadway support design and all types of civil engineering tunnels.

Conference paper

Oraee K, Oraee B, Bangian AH, 2010, Design Optimization of Longwall Chain Pillars, 29th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining (ICGCM), Publisher: ICGCM

Determination of the optimum design of chain pillars has a significant effect on the economics and safety of Longwall operations. Most pillar design formulae are based on empirical methods with supplemented by local experience. They therefore lack versatility of application under different geotechnical conditions. In this paper, in order to illustrate the shortcomings of the above, a typical real coal pillar in Tabas coal mine has first been studied and the conventional formulae have been used to determine the optimum dimensions. The results show that a wide difference exists between the predicted and the real field data. The Oraee-Hosseini formula has then been applied to this mine in order to determine the optimum design. The results from this formula demonstrate a close fit between the theoretical values and those produced by laboratory tests and in practice. It is further demonstrated that the wide discrepancy between the results obtained from the two formulae is attributed to the dissimilarities between geotechnical conditions of Tabas and the original regions whose data were used to devise the empirical formulae. It is finally concluded that the application of numerical simulation methods and experimental equations together with engineering judgment used by the mining design engineer, will provide the most accurate design characteristics.

Conference paper

Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2009, Using an attendant propelled wheelchair to enter and exit train carriages

Thesis dissertation

Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2008, Sorptivity of Concrete

Thesis dissertation

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