Imperial College London

Dr Colin J Boyle

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Bioengineering

Research Associate
 
 
 
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c.boyle CV

 
 
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Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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7 results found

Boyle C, Carpanen D, Pandelani T, Higgins C, Masen M, Masouros Set al., 2020, Lateral pressure equalisation as a principle for designing support surfaces to prevent deep tissue pressure ulcers, PLoS One, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1932-6203

When immobile or neuropathic patients are supported by beds or chairs, their soft tissues undergo deformations that can cause pressure ulcers. Current support surfaces that redistribute under-body pressures at vulnerable body sites have not succeeded in reducing pressure ulcer prevalence. Here we show that adding a supporting lateral pressure can counter-act the deformations induced by under-body pressure, and that this ‘pressure equalisation’ approach is a more effective way to reduce ulcer-inducing deformations than current approaches based on redistributing under-body pressure.A finite element model of the seated pelvis predicts that applying a lateral pressure to the soft tissue reduces peak von Mises stress in the deep tissue by a factor of 2.4 relative to a standard cushion (from 113 kPa to 47 kPA) — a greater effect than that achieved by using a more conformable cushion, which reduced von Mises stress to 75 kPa. Combining both a conformable cushion and lateral pressure reduced peak von Mises stresses to 25 kPa. The ratio of peak lateral pressure to peak under-body pressure was shown to regulate deep tissue stress better than under-body pressure alone. By optimising the magnitude and position of lateral pressure, tissue deformations can be reduced to that induced when suspended in a fluid.Our results explain the lack of efficacy in current support surfaces and suggest a new approach to designing and evaluating support surfaces: ensuring sufficient lateral pressure is applied to counter-act under-body pressure.

Journal article

Boyle C, Plotczyk M, Fayos Villalta S, Patel S, Hettiaratchy S, Masouros S, Masen M, Higgins Cet al., 2019, Morphology and composition play distinct and complementary roles in the tolerance of plantar skin to mechanical load, Science Advances, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2375-2548

Plantar skin on the soles of the feet has a distinct morphology and composition that is thought to enhance its tolerance ofmechanical loads, although the individual contributions of morphology and compositionhave never been quantified. Here, we combine multi-scale mechanical testing and computational models of load bearing to quantify the mechanical environment of both plantar and non-plantar skinunder load. We find that morphology and composition play distinct and complementary roles in plantar skin’ load tolerance. More specifically, the thick stratum corneum provides protection from stress-based injuriessuch as skin tears and blisters,while epidermal and dermal composition provide protection from deformation-based injuriessuch as pressure ulcers. This work provides insights into the roles of skin morphology and composition more generally and will inform the design of engineered skin substitutes as well as the etiologyof skin injury.

Journal article

Topouzi H, Boyle C, Williams G, Higgins Cet al., Harnessing the secretome of hair follicle fibroblasts to accelerate ex vivo healing of human skin wounds, Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN: 0022-202X

In skin homeostasis, dermal fibroblasts are responsible for coordinating the migration and differentiation of overlying epithelial keratinocytes. As hairy skin heals faster than non-hairy skin, we took bio-inspiration from the follicle and hypothesised that follicular fibroblasts would accelerate skin re-epithelialisation after injury faster than interfollicular fibroblasts. Using both in vitro and ex vivo models of human skin wound closure, we found that hair follicle dermal papilla fibroblasts could accelerate closureof in vitro scratch woundsby 1.8-fold and epithelial growth capacity by 1.5-fold compared to controls (p<0.05).We used a cytokine array to determine how the dermal papilla fibroblasts were elucidating this effect and identified two cytokines, sAXL and CCL19, which are released at significantly higher levels by follicular fibroblasts compared to interfollicular sub-types. Using sAXL and CCL19 individually, we found that they could also increase closureof epithelial cells in a scratch wound by 1.2 and 1.5-fold respectively, compared to controls (p<0.05).We performed an unbiased transcriptional analysis, combined with pathway analysis, and postulate that sAXL accelerates wound closure by promoting migration and inhibiting epithelialdifferentiation of skin keratinocytes. Long term, we believe these results can be exploited to accelerate wound closure of human skin in vivo.

Journal article

Boyle CJ, Lennon AB, Prendergast PJ, 2013, Application of a mechanobiological simulation technique to stents used clinically, JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS, Vol: 46, Pages: 918-924, ISSN: 0021-9290

Journal article

Boyle CJ, Lennon AB, Prendergast PJ, 2011, In Silico Prediction of the Mechanobiological Response of Arterial Tissue: Application to Angioplasty and Stenting, JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME, Vol: 133, ISSN: 0148-0731

Journal article

Boyle CJ, Lennon AB, Early M, Kelly DJ, Lally C, Prendergast PJet al., 2010, Computational simulation methodologies for mechanobiological modelling: a cell-centred approach to neointima development in stents, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES, Vol: 368, Pages: 2919-2935, ISSN: 1364-503X

Journal article

Boyle CJ, Carpanen D, Pandelani T, Higgins CA, Masen MA, Masouros SDet al., Lateral pressure equalisation as a principle for designing support surfaces to prevent deep tissue pressure ulcers, Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>When immobile or neuropathic patients are supported by beds or chairs, their soft tissues undergo deformations that can cause pressure ulcers. Current support surfaces that redistribute under-body pressures at vulnerable body sites have not succeeded in reducing pressure ulcer prevalence. Here we show that adding a supporting lateral pressure can counter-act the deformations induced by under-body pressure, and that this ‘pressure equalisation’ approach is a more effective way to reduce ulcer-inducing deformations than current approaches based on redistributing under-body pressure.</jats:p><jats:p>A finite element model of the seated pelvis predicts that applying a lateral pressure to the soft tissue reduces peak von Mises stress in the deep tissue by a factor of 2.4 relative to a standard cushion — a greater effect than that achieved by using a more conformable cushion. The ratio of peak lateral pressure to peak under-body pressure was shown to regulate deep tissue stress better than under-body pressure alone. By optimising the magnitude and position of lateral pressure, tissue deformations can be reduced to that induced when suspended in a fluid.</jats:p><jats:p>Our results explain the lack of efficacy in current support surfaces, and suggest a new approach to designing and evaluating support surfaces: ensuring sufficient lateral pressure is applied to counter-act under-body pressure.</jats:p>

Working paper

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