Imperial College London

DrCeciliaJohansson

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Reader in Respiratory Immunology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2531c.johansson

 
 
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Location

 

367Wright Fleming WingSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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38 results found

Antepowicz A, Habib O, Kirsebom F, Johansson C, Gill DR, Hyde SCet al., 2021, Lentiviral and AAV-mediated expression of palivizumab offer protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2045-2322

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a common cause of hospitalisation in infants and the elderly. Palivizumab prophylaxis is the only approved treatment modality but is costly and only offered to select vulnerable populations. Here, we investigated gene delivery approaches via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV2/8) and simian immunodeficiency virus (rSIV.F/HN) vectors to achieve sustained in vivo production of palivizumab in a murine model. Delivery of palivizumab-expressing vectors 28 days prior to RSV challenge resulted in complete protection from RSV-induced weight loss. This approach offers prophylaxis against RSV infection, allowing for wider use and reduction in treatment costs in vulnerable populations.

Journal article

Johansson C, Kirsebom F, 2020, Neutrophils in Respiratory Viral Infections, Mucosal Immunology, ISSN: 1933-0219

Viral respiratory infections are a common cause of severe disease, especially in infants,people who are immunocompromised and in the elderly. Neutrophils, an important innateimmune cell, infiltrate the lungs rapidly after an inflammatory insult. The most wellcharacterized effector mechanisms by which neutrophils contribute to host defense arelargely extracellular and the involvement of neutrophils in protection from numerousbacterial and fungal infections is well established. However, the role of neutrophils inresponses to viruses, which replicate intracellularly, has been less studied. It remainsunclear whether and, by which underlying immunological mechanisms, neutrophilscontribute to viral control or confer protection against an intracellular pathogen.Furthermore, neutrophils need to be tightly regulated to avoid bystander damage to hosttissues. This is especially relevant in the lung where damage to delicate alveolar structurescan compromise gas exchange with life-threatening consequences. It is inherently lessclear how neutrophils can contribute to host immunity to viruses without causingimmunopathology and/or exacerbating disease severity. In this review we summarize anddiscuss the current understanding of how neutrophils in the lung direct immune responsesto viruses, control viral replication and spread, and cause pathology during respiratory viralinfections.

Journal article

Habibi M, Thwaites R, Chang M, Jozwik A, Paras A, Kirsebom F, Varese A, Owen A, Cuthbertson L, James P, Tunstall T, Nickle D, Hansel T, Moffatt M, Johansson C, Chiu C, Openshaw Pet al., 2020, Neutrophilic inflammation in the respiratory mucosa predisposes to RSV infection, Science, Vol: 370, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 0036-8075

INTRODUCTIONEven with intimate exposure to a virus, some people fail to become infected. Variable transmission partly depends on the dose and duration of exposure but is also governed by the immune status of the host, such as the presence of specific protective antibodies or T cells. However, for some infections, the reasons for erratic transmission are largely unknown. For example, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can repeatedly reinfect individuals throughout their lives despite the presence of specific immunity. Additionally, antibodies and T cells have limited efficacy against newly emergent pathogens with pandemic potential. However, the intrinsic and innate mechanisms underlying protection when people are exposed to these viruses are poorly understood.RATIONALEWe reasoned that the prior state of the respiratory mucosa’s innate defenses may contribute to the variable outcome of RSV inoculation. By performing experimental challenge of adult volunteers, we were able to measure variations in the status of the nasal mucosa before inoculation and in mucosal responses during the presymptomatic phase of infection. Neither of these phases is easily observable during natural spontaneous transmission. Our observations could then be validated using specific interventional studies in a well-established mouse model of RSV infection.RESULTSAfter nasal administration of RSV, 57% of inoculated volunteers became infected. The uptake of infection was poorly explained by specific B or T cell immunity. However, transcriptomic profiling of the nasal tissue before inoculation demonstrated a neutrophilic inflammatory signal in those destined to develop symptomatic infection, and this was associated with suppression of an early interleukin-17 (IL-17)–dominated immune response during the presymptomatic period. This was followed by symptomatic infection associated with the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. By contrast, those who resisted infection showed a transient

Journal article

Paulsen M, Varese A, Pinpathomrat N, Kirsebom F, Paulsen M, Johansson Cet al., 2020, MAVS-deficiency is associated with a reduced T cell response upon secondary RSV infection in mice, Frontiers in Immunology, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1664-3224

Infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) occurs repeatedly throughout life because sustained, protective memory responses fail to develop. Why this occurs is not known. During RSV infection the recognition of the virus via the cytosolic RIG-I like receptors and signaling via the adaptor protein MAVS is crucial for mounting an innate immune response. However, if this signaling pathway is important for T cell responses during primary infection and during re-infection is not fully elucidated. We describe a second peak of pro-inflammatory mediators during the primary immune response to RSV that coincides with the arrival of T cells into the lung. This second peak of cytokines/chemokines is regulated differently than the early peak and is largely independent of signaling via MAVS. This was concurrent with Mavs−/− mice mounting a strong T cell response to primary RSV infection, with robust IFN-γ; and Granzyme B production. However, after RSV re-infection, Mavs−/− mice showed fewer CD4+ and CD8+ short term memory T cells and their capacity to produce IFN-γ; and Granzyme B, was decreased. In sum, cytosolic recognition of RSV is important not only for initiating innate anti-viral responses but also for generating or maintaining efficient, short term T cell memory responses.

Journal article

Johansson C, Makris S, 2020, R848 or influenza virus can induce potent innate immune responses in the lungs of neonatal mice, Mucosal Immunology, Vol: 14, Pages: 267-276, ISSN: 1933-0219

Innate immune responses are important to protect the neonatal lung, which becomes exposed to commensal and pathogenic microorganisms immediately after birth, at a time when both the lung and the adaptive immune system are still developing. How immune cells in the neonatal lung respond to innate immune stimuli, including toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, or viruses, is currently unclear. To address this, adult and neonatal mice were intranasally administered with various innate immune stimuli, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or influenza virus and cytokine and chemokine levels were quantified. The neonatal lungs responded weakly to RSV and most stimuli but more strongly than adult mice to R848 and influenza virus, both of which activate TLR7 and the inflammasome. Notably, neonatal lungs also contained higher levels of cAMP, a secondary messenger produced following adenosine receptor signaling, than adult lungs and increased responsiveness to R848 was observed in adult mice when adenosine was coadministered. Our data suggest that the neonatal lung may respond preferentially to stimuli that coactivate TLR7 and the inflammasome and that these responses may be amplified by extracellular adenosine. Improved understanding of regulation of immune responses in the neonatal lung can inform the development of vaccine adjuvants for the young.

Journal article

Kirsebom F, Michalaki C, Agueda-Oyarzabal M, Johansson Cet al., 2020, Neutrophils do not impact viral load or the peak of disease severity during RSV infection, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

Lung and airway neutrophils are a hallmark of severe disease in infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced lower respiratory tract infections. Despite their abundance in the lungs during RSV infection of both mice and man, the role of neutrophils in viral control and in immune pathology is not clear. Here, antibody mediated neutrophil depletion was used to investigate the degree to which neutrophils impact the lung immune environment, the control of viral replication and the peak severity of disease after RSV infection of mice. Neutrophil depletion did not substantially affect the levels of inflammatory mediators such as type I interferons, IL-6, TNF-α or IL-1β in response to RSV. In addition, the lack of neutrophils did not change the viral load during RSV infection. Neither neutrophil depletion nor the enhancement of lung neutrophils by administration of the chemoattractant CXCL1 during RSV infection affected disease severity as measured by weight loss. Therefore, in this model of RSV infection, lung neutrophils do not offer obvious benefits to the host in terms of increasing anti-viral inflammatory responses or restricting viral replication and neutrophils do not contribute to disease severity.

Journal article

Kirsebom FCM, Kausar F, Nuriev R, Makris S, Johansson Cet al., 2019, Neutrophil recruitment and activation are differentially dependent on MyD88/TRIF and MAVS signaling during RSV infection, Mucosal Immunology, Vol: 12, Pages: 1244-1255, ISSN: 1933-0219

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections, especially in infants. Lung neutrophilia is a hallmark of RSV disease but the mechanism by which neutrophils are recruited and activated is unclear. Here, we investigate the innate immune signaling pathways underlying neutrophil recruitment and activation in RSV-infected mice. We show that MyD88/TRIF signaling is essential for lung neutrophil recruitment while MAVS signaling, leading to type I IFN production, is necessary for neutrophil activation. Consistent with that notion, administration of type I IFNs to the lungs of RSV-infected Mavs-/- mice partially activates lung neutrophils recruited via the MyD88/TRIF pathway. Conversely, lack of neutrophil recruitment to the lungs of RSV-infected Myd88/Trif-/- mice can be reversed by administration of chemoattractants and those neutrophils become fully activated. Interestingly, Myd88/Trif-/- mice did not have increased lung RSV loads during infection, suggesting that neutrophils are dispensable for control of the virus. Thus, two distinct pathogen sensing pathways collaborate for neutrophil recruitment and full activation during RSV infection.

Journal article

Progatzky F, Jha A, Wane M, Thwaites RS, Makris S, Shattock RJ, Johansson C, Openshaw PJ, Bugeon L, Hansel TT, Dallman MJet al., 2019, Induction of innate cytokine responses by respiratory mucosal challenge with R848 in zebrafish, mice and humans, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol: 144, Pages: 342-345.e7, ISSN: 0091-6749

We compared live zebrafish, mouse and human nasal challenge responses to the TLR7/8 agonist resiquimod (R848). We found remarkably similar induction of mediators in the three species, offering novel mucosal models of innate anti-viral immunity.

Journal article

Nuriev R, Johansson C, 2019, Chemokine regulation of inflammation during respiratory syncytial virus infection., F1000Res, Vol: 8

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause severe lower respiratory tract infections especially in infants, immunocompromised individuals and the elderly and is the most common cause of infant hospitalisation in the developed world. The immune responses against RSV are crucial for viral control and clearance but, if dysregulated, can also result in immunopathology and impaired gas exchange. Lung immunity to RSV and other respiratory viruses begins with the recruitment of immune cells from the bloodstream into the lungs. This inflammatory process is controlled largely by chemokines, which are small proteins that are produced in response to innate immune detection of the virus or the infection process. These chemokines serve as chemoattractants for granulocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes and other leukocytes. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the field of RSV infection and disease, focusing on how chemokines regulate virus-induced inflammation.

Journal article

Antepowicz A, Kirsebom F, Johansson C, Gill DR, Hyde SCet al., 2018, Antibody gene transfer for prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, Conference on Changing the Face of Modern Medicine - Stem Cell and Gene Therapy, Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, Pages: A118-A118, ISSN: 1043-0342

Conference paper

Li H, Bradley KC, Long JS, Frise R, Ashcroft JW, Hartgroves LC, Shelton H, Makris S, Johansson C, Cao B, Barclay WSet al., 2018, Internal genes of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus determine high viral replication in myeloid cells and severe outcome of infection in mice., PLoS Pathogens, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1553-7366

The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 influenza virus has been a public health concern for more than a decade because of its frequent zoonoses and the high case fatality rate associated with human infections. Severe disease following H5N1 influenza infection is often associated with dysregulated host innate immune response also known as cytokine storm but the virological and cellular basis of these responses has not been clearly described. We rescued a series of 6:2 reassortant viruses that combined a PR8 HA/NA pairing with the internal gene segments from human adapted H1N1, H3N2, or avian H5N1 viruses and found that mice infected with the virus with H5N1 internal genes suffered severe weight loss associated with increased lung cytokines but not high viral load. This phenotype did not map to the NS gene segment, and NS1 protein of H5N1 virus functioned as a type I IFN antagonist as efficient as NS1 of H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. Instead we discovered that the internal genes of H5N1 virus supported a much higher level of replication of viral RNAs in myeloid cells in vitro but not in epithelial cells and that this was associated with high induction of type I IFN in myeloid cells. We also found that in vivo during H5N1 recombinant virus infection cells of haematopoetic origin were infected and produced type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together our data infer that human and avian influenza viruses are differently controlled by host factors in alternative cell types; internal gene segments of avian H5N1 virus uniquely drove high viral replication in myeloid cells, which triggered an excessive cytokine production, resulting in severe immunopathology.

Journal article

Webb LM, Lundie RJ, Borger JG, Brown SL, Connor LM, Cartwright ANR, Dougall AM, Wilbers RHP, Cook PC, Jackson-Jones LH, Phythian-Adams AT, Johansson C, Davis DM, Dewals BG, Ronchese F, MacDonald ASet al., 2017, Type I interferon is required for T helper (Th) 2 induction by dendritic cells, EMBO JOURNAL, Vol: 36, Pages: 2404-2418, ISSN: 0261-4189

Type 2 inflammation is a defining feature of infection with parasitic worms (helminths), as well as being responsible for widespread suffering in allergies. However, the precise mechanisms involved in T helper (Th) 2 polarization by dendritic cells (DCs) are currently unclear. We have identified a previously unrecognized role for type I IFN (IFN‐I) in enabling this process. An IFN‐I signature was evident in DCs responding to the helminth Schistosoma mansoni or the allergen house dust mite (HDM). Further, IFN‐I signaling was required for optimal DC phenotypic activation in response to helminth antigen (Ag), and efficient migration to, and localization with, T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN). Importantly, DCs generated from Ifnar1−/− mice were incapable of initiating Th2 responses in vivo. These data demonstrate for the first time that the influence of IFN‐I is not limited to antiviral or bacterial settings but also has a central role to play in DC initiation of Th2 responses.

Journal article

Makris S, Paulsen M, Johansson C, 2017, Type I interferons as regulators of lung inflammation, Frontiers in Immunology, Vol: 8, ISSN: 1664-3224

Immune responses to lung infections must be tightly regulated in order to permit pathogen eradication while maintaining organ function. Exuberant or dysregulated inflammation can impair gas exchange and underlies many instances of lung disease. An important driver of inflammation in the lung is the interferon (IFN) response. Type I IFNs are anti-viral cytokines that induce a large range of proteins that impair viral replication in infected cells. This cell-intrinsic action plays a crucial role in protecting the lungs from spread of respiratory viruses. However, type I IFNs have also recently been found to be central to the initiation of lung inflammatory responses, by inducing recruitment and activation of immune cells. This helps control virus burden but can cause detrimental immunopathology and contribute to disease severity. Furthermore, there is now increasing evidence that type I IFNs are not only induced after viral infections but also after infection with bacteria and fungi. The pro-inflammatory function of type I IFNs in the lung opens up the possibility of immune modulation directed against this anti-viral cytokine family. In this review, the initiation and signaling of type I IFNs as well as their role in driving and maintaining lung inflammation will be discussed.

Journal article

Openshaw PJM, Chiu C, Culley FJ, Johansson Cet al., 2017, Protective and Harmful Immunity to RSV Infection, Annual Review of Immunology, Vol: 35, Pages: 501-532, ISSN: 0732-0582

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an exceptional mucosal pathogen. It specializes in infection of the ciliated respiratory epithelium, causing disease of variable severity with little or no direct systemic effects. It infects virtually all children by the age of three years and then repeatedly infects throughout life; this it does despite relatively slight variations in antigenicity, apparently by inducing selective immunological amnesia. Inappropriate or dysregulated responses to RSV can be pathogenic, causing disease-enhancing inflammation that contributes to short- and long-term effects. In addition, RSV's importance as a largely unrecognized pathogen of debilitated older people is increasingly evident. Vaccines that induce nonpathogenic protective immunity may soon be available, and it is possible that different vaccines will be optimal for infants; older children; young to middle-age adults (including pregnant women); and elderly persons. At the dawn of RSV vaccination, it is timely to review what is known (and unknown) about immune responses to this fascinating virus.

Journal article

Johansson C, 2016, Respiratory syncytial virus infection: an innate perspective., F1000Research, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2046-1402

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract infection in children and adults. However, infection with this virus sometimes leads to severe lower respiratory disease and is the major cause of infant hospitalisations in the developed world. Several risk factors such as baby prematurity and congenital heart disease are known to predispose towards severe disease but previously healthy, full-term infants can also develop bronchiolitis and viral pneumonia during RSV infection. The causes of severe disease are not fully understood but may include dysregulation of the immune response to the virus, resulting in excessive recruitment and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells that can cause damage. This review highlights recent discoveries on the balancing act of immune-mediated virus clearance versus immunopathology during RSV infection.

Journal article

Makris S, Bajorek M, Culley F, Goritzka M, Johansson Cet al., 2016, Alveolar Macrophages Can Control Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in the Absence of Type I Interferons, Journal of Innate Immunity, Vol: 8, ISSN: 1662-8128

Journal article

Goritzka M, Pereira C, Makris S, Durant L, Johansson Cet al., 2015, T cell responses are elicited against Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the absence of signalling through TLRs, RLRs and IL-1R/IL-18R, Scientific Reports, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2045-2322

Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and cytokine receptors are key players in the initiation of immune responses to infection. PRRs detecting viral RNA, such as toll like receptor (TLR)-3, -7/8, and RIG-I like receptors (RLRs; RIG-I and MDA-5), as well as cytokine receptors such as interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R), have been implicated in responses to RNA viruses that infect the airways. The latter includes respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a human pathogen that can cause severe lower respiratory tract infections, especially in infants. To evaluate the collective contribution of PRRs and IL-1R signalling to RSV immunity, we generated Myd88/Trif/Mavs−/− mice that are deficient in signalling by all TLRs, RLRs and IL-1R, as well as other cytokine receptors such as IL-18 receptor. Early production of pro-inflammatory mediators and lung infiltration by immune cells were completely abrogated in infected Myd88/Trif/Mavs−/− mice. However, RSV-specific CD8+ T cells were elicited and recruited into the lungs and airways. Consistent with these findings, Myd88/Trif/Mavs−/− mice survived RSV infection but displayed higher viral load and weight loss. These data highlight an unappreciated level of redundancy in pathways that couple innate virus sensing to adaptive immunity, providing the host with remarkable resilience to infection.

Journal article

Goritzka M, Makris S, Kausar F, Durant LR, Pereira C, Kumagai Y, Culley FJ, Mack M, Akira S, Johansson Cet al., 2015, Alveolar macrophage-derived type I interferons orchestrate innate immunity to RSV through recruitment of antiviral monocytes, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol: 212, Pages: 699-714, ISSN: 0022-1007

Type I interferons (IFNs) are important for host defense from viral infections, acting to restrict viral production in infected cells and to promote antiviral immune responses. However, the type I IFN system has also been associated with severe lung inflammatory disease in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Which cells produce type I IFNs upon RSV infection and how this directs immune responses to the virus, and potentially results in pathological inflammation, is unclear. Here, we show that alveolar macrophages (AMs) are the major source of type I IFNs upon RSV infection in mice. AMs detect RSV via mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)–coupled retinoic acid–inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)–like receptors (RLRs), and loss of MAVS greatly compromises innate immune restriction of RSV. This is largely attributable to loss of type I IFN–dependent induction of monocyte chemoattractants and subsequent reduced recruitment of inflammatory monocytes (infMo) to the lungs. Notably, the latter have potent antiviral activity and are essential to control infection and lessen disease severity. Thus, infMo recruitment constitutes an important and hitherto underappreciated, cell-extrinsic mechanism of type I IFN–mediated antiviral activity. Dysregulation of this system of host antiviral defense may underlie the development of RSV-induced severe lung inflammation.

Journal article

Goritzka M, Makris S, Kausar F, Durant L, Pereira C, Kumagai Y, Culley F, Mack M, Openshaw P, Akira S, Johansson Cet al., 2014, Alveolar macrophages modulate innate immune responses to Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection through MAVS signalling and type I interferons, 9th European-Mucosal-Immunology-Group Meeting, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 7-8, ISSN: 0019-2805

Conference paper

Durant LR, Pereira C, Boakye A, Makris S, Kausar F, Goritzka M, Johansson Cet al., 2014, DNGR-1 is dispensable for CD8(+) T-cell priming during respiratory syncytial virus infection, European Journal of Immunology, Vol: 44, Pages: 2340-2348, ISSN: 1521-4141

During respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection CD8+ T cells both assist in viral clearance and contribute to immunopathology. CD8+ T cells recognize viral peptides presented by dendritic cells (DCs), which can directly present viral antigens when infected or, alternatively, “cross-present” antigens after endocytosis of dead or dying infected cells. Mouse CD8α+ and CD103+ DCs excel at cross-presentation, in part because they express the receptor DNGR-1 that detects dead cells by binding to exposed F-actin and routes internalized cell debris into the cross-presentation pathway. As RSV causes death in infected epithelial cells, we tested whether cross-presentation via DNGR-1 is necessary for CD8+ T-cell responses to the virus. DNGR-1-deficient or wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with RSV and the magnitude of RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell induction was measured. We found that during live RSV infection, cross-presentation via DNGR-1 did not have a major role in the generation of RSV–specific CD8+ T-cell responses. However, after intranasal immunization with dead cells infected with RSV, a dependence on DNGR-1 for RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses was observed, confirming the ascribed role of the receptor. Thus, direct presentation by DCs may be the major pathway initiating CD8+ T-cell responses to RSV, while DNGR-1-dependent cross-presentation has no detectable role.

Journal article

Goritzka M, Durant LR, Pereira C, Salek-Ardakani S, Openshaw PJM, Johansson Cet al., 2014, Alpha/Beta Interferon Receptor Signaling Amplifies Early Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in the Lung during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection, Journal of Virology, Vol: 88, Pages: 6128-6136, ISSN: 0022-538X

Type I interferons (IFNs) are produced early upon virus infection and signal through the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) to induce genes that encode proteins important for limiting viral replication and directing immune responses. To investigate the extent to which type I IFNs play a role in the local regulation of inflammation in the airways, we examined their importance in early lung responses to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). IFNAR1-deficient (IFNAR1−/−) mice displayed increased lung viral load and weight loss during RSV infection. As expected, expression of IFN-inducible genes was markedly reduced in the lungs of IFNAR1−/− mice. Surprisingly, we found that the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs of RSV-infected mice were also greatly reduced in the absence of IFNAR signaling. Furthermore, low levels of proinflammatory cytokines were also detected in the lungs of IFNAR1−/− mice challenged with noninfectious innate immune stimuli such as selected Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Finally, recombinant IFN-α was sufficient to potentiate the production of inflammatory mediators in the lungs of wild-type mice challenged with innate immune stimuli. Thus, in addition to its well-known role in antiviral resistance, type I IFN receptor signaling acts as a central driver of early proinflammatory responses in the lung. Inhibiting the effects of type I IFNs may therefore be useful in dampening inflammation in lung diseases characterized by enhanced inflammatory cytokine production.

Journal article

Durant LR, Makris S, Voorburg CM, Loebbermann J, Johansson C, Openshaw PJMet al., 2013, Regulatory T Cells Prevent Th2 Immune Responses and Pulmonary Eosinophilia during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Mice, JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, Vol: 87, Pages: 10946-10954, ISSN: 0022-538X

Journal article

Tregoning JS, Wang BL, McDonald JU, Yamaguchi Y, Harker JA, Goritzka M, Johansson C, Bukreyev A, Collins PL, Openshaw PJet al., 2013, Neonatal antibody responses are attenuated by interferon-gamma produced by NK and T cells during RSV infection, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 110, Pages: 5576-5581, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Loebbermann J, Durant L, Thornton H, Johansson C, Openshaw PJet al., 2013, Defective immunoregulation in RSV vaccine-augmented viral lung disease restored by selective chemoattraction of regulatory T cells, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 110, Pages: 2987-2992, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Loebbermann J, Thornton H, Durant L, Sparwasser T, Webster KE, Sprent J, Culley FJ, Johansson C, Openshaw PJet al., 2012, Regulatory T cells expressing granzyme B play a critical role in controlling lung inflammation during acute viral infection, MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 5, Pages: 161-172, ISSN: 1933-0219

Journal article

Loebbermann J, Schnoeller C, Thornton H, Durant L, Sweeney NP, Schuijs M, O'Garra A, Johansson C, Openshaw PJet al., 2012, IL-10 Regulates Viral Lung Immunopathology during Acute Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Mice, PLOS ONE, Vol: 7, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Schnoeller C, Loebbermann J, Durant L, Johansson C, Thornton H, O'Garra A, Openshaw Pet al., 2011, Roles for IL-10 in RSV infection, Annual Congress of the British-Society-for-Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 199-199, ISSN: 0019-2805

Conference paper

Schnoeller C, Loebbermann J, Johansson C, Thornton H, Sawant D, Benjamin CA, O'Garra A, Openshaw PJet al., 2010, The role of IL-10 in RSV infection, Annual Congress of the British-Society-for-Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC, Pages: 176-176, ISSN: 0019-2805

Conference paper

Lee DCP, Harker JAE, Tregoning JS, Atabani SF, Johansson C, Schwarze J, Openshaw PJMet al., 2010, CD25(+) Natural Regulatory T Cells Are Critical in Limiting Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Resolving Disease following Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection, JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, Vol: 84, Pages: 8790-8798, ISSN: 0022-538X

Journal article

Johansson C, Wetzel JD, He J, Mikacenic C, Dermody TS, Kelsall BLet al., 2007, Type I interferons produced by hematopoietic cells protect mice against lethal infection by mammalian reovirus, JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 204, Pages: 1349-1358, ISSN: 0022-1007

Journal article

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