Imperial College London

Mr Christos Kontovounisios

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Senior Lecturer in Colorectal Surgery
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3315 8529c.kontovounisios

 
 
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Location

 

Chelsea and Westminster HospitalChelsea and Westminster Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

202 results found

Kontovounisios C, 2022, Colorectal cancer and the obese patient: a call for guidelines, Cancers, ISSN: 2072-6694

The link between obesity and colorectal cancer has been well established. The worldwiderise in obesity rates in the past 40 years means that we are dealing with increasing numbers of obesepatients with colorectal cancer. We aimed to review the existing guidelines and make recommendations specific to this group of patients. Upon comparing the current guidelines from the NationalComprehensive Cancer Network®(NCCN®), the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO)and the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR), we observed that these didnot take into consideration the needs of obese patients. We proceeded to make specific recommendations with regards to the diagnostic work-up, surgical pathways, minimally invasive technique,perioperative treatment, post-operative surveillance, and management of metastatic disease in thisgroup of patients. Our review highlights the need for modification of the existing guidelines to account for the needs of this patient cohort. A multidisciplinary approach, including principles usedby bariatric surgeons, should be the way forward to reach consensus in the management of thisgroup of patients.

Journal article

Fadel MG, Ahmed M, Malietzis G, Pellino G, Rasheed S, Brown G, Tekkis P, Kontovounisios Cet al., 2022, Oncological outcomes of multimodality treatment for patients undergoing surgery for locally recurrent rectal cancer: A systematic review, CANCER TREATMENT REVIEWS, Vol: 109, ISSN: 0305-7372

Journal article

Celentano V, Perrott C, Tejedor P, Calini G, Rottoli M, Kontovounisios C, Tekkis Pet al., 2022, The INTESTINE study: INtended TEmporary STomas In crohN's diseasE. Protocol for an international multicentre study, UPDATES IN SURGERY, Vol: 74, Pages: 1691-1696, ISSN: 2038-131X

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2022, Management and outcomes in anal canal adenocarcinomas – a systematic review, Cancers, Vol: 14, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 2072-6694

(1) Background: Anal canal adenocarcinomas constitute 1% of all gastrointestinal tract cancers. There is a current lack of consensus and NICE guidelines in the United Kingdom regarding the management of this disease. The overall objective was to perform a systematic review on the multitude of practice and subsequent outcomes in this group. (2) Methods: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, EMCARE and CINAHL databases were interrogated between 2011 to 2021. PRISMA guidelines were used to select relevant studies. The primary outcome measure was 5-year overall survival (OS). Secondary outcome measures included both local recurrences (LR) and distant metastases (DM). The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used to assess the quality of studies retrieved. The study was registered on PROSPERO (338286). (3) Results: Fifteen studies were included. Overall, there were 11,967 participants who were demographically matched. There were 2090 subjects in the largest study and five subjects in the smallest study. Treatment modalities varied from neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), CRT and surgery (CRT+S), surgery then CRT (S+CRT) and surgery only (S). Five-year OS ranged from 30.2% to 91% across the literature. LR rates ranged from 22% to 29%; DM ranged from 6% to 60%. Study heterogeneity precluded meta-analysis. (4) Conclusions: Trimodality treatment with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by radical surgery of abdominoperineal excision of rectum (APER) appeared to be the most effective approach, giving the best survival outcomes according to the current data.

Journal article

Woodfield G, Belluomo I, Laponogov I, Veselkov K, COBRA1 Working Group, Cross AJ, Hanna GB, Boshier PR, Lin GP, Myridakis A, Ayrton O, Španěl P, Vidal-Diez A, Romano A, Martin J, Marelli L, Groves C, Monahan K, Kontovounisios C, Saunders BPet al., 2022, Diagnostic performance of a non-invasive breath test for colorectal cancer: COBRA1 study, Gastroenterology, ISSN: 0016-5085

Journal article

Celentano V, Tekkis P, Nordenvall C, Mills S, Spinelli A, Smart N, Selvaggi F, Warren O, Espin-Basany E, Kontovounisios C, Pellino G, Warusavitarne J, Hancock L, Myrelid P, Remzi Fet al., 2022, Standardization of ileoanal J-pouch surgery technique: Quality assessment of minimally invasive ileoanal J-pouch surgery videos, SURGERY, Vol: 172, Pages: 53-59, ISSN: 0039-6060

Journal article

Kouli O, Murray V, Bhatia S, Cambridge WA, Kawka M, Shafi S, Knight SR, Kamarajah SK, McLean KA, Glasbey JC, Khaw RA, Ahmed W, Akhbari M, Baker D, Borakati A, Mills E, Thavayogan R, Yasin I, Raubenheimer K, Ridley W, Sarrami M, Zhang G, Egoroff N, Pockney P, Richards T, Bhangu A, Creagh-Brown B, Edwards M, Harrison EM, Lee M, Nepogodiev D, Pinkney T, Pearse R, Smart N, Vohra R, Sohrabi C, Jamieson A, Nguyen M, Rahman A, English C, Tincknell L, Kakodkar P, Kwek I, Punjabi N, Burns J, Varghese S, Erotocritou M, McGuckin S, Vayalapra S, Dominguez E, Moneim J, Salehi M, Tan HL, Yoong A, Zhu L, Seale B, Nowinka Z, Patel N, Chrisp B, Harris J, Maleyko I, Muneeb F, Gough M, James CE, Skan O, Chowdhury A, Rebuffa N, Khan H, Down B, Fatimah Hussain Q, Adams M, Bailey A, Cullen G, Fu YXJ, McClement B, Taylor A, Aitken S, Bachelet B, Brousse de Gersigny J, Chang C, Khehra B, Lahoud N, Lee Solano M, Louca M, Rozenbroek P, Rozitis E, Agbinya N, Anderson E, Arwi G, Barry I, Batchelor C, Chong T, Choo LY, Clark L, Daniels M, Goh J, Handa A, Hanna J, Huynh L, Jeon A, Kanbour A, Lee A, Lee J, Lee T, Leigh J, Ly D, McGregor F, Moss J, Nejatian M, O'Loughlin E, Ramos I, Sanchez B, Shrivathsa A, Sincari A, Sobhi S, Swart R, Trimboli J, Wignall P, Bourke E, Chong A, Clayton S, Dawson A, Hardy E, Iqbal R, Le L, Mao S, Marinelli I, Metcalfe H, Panicker D, R HH, Ridgway S, Tan HH, Thong S, Van M, Woon S, Woon-Shoo-Tong XS, Yu S, Ali K, Chee J, Chiu C, Chow YW, Duller A, Nagappan P, Ng S, Selvanathan M, Sheridan C, Temple M, Do JE, Dudi-Venkata NN, Humphries E, Li L, Mansour LT, Massy-Westropp C, Fang B, Farbood K, Hong H, Huang Y, Joan M, Koh C, Liu YHA, Mahajan T, Muller E, Park R, Tanudisastro M, Wu JJG, Chopra P, Giang S, Radcliffe S, Thach P, Wallace D, Wilkes A, Chinta SH, Li J, Phan J, Rahman F, Segaran A, Shannon J, Zhang M, Adams N, Bonte A, Choudhry A, Colterjohn N, Croyle JA, Donohue J, Feighery A, Keane A, McNamara D, Munir K, Roche D, Sabnani R, Seligman D, Sharma S, Stickney Zet al., 2022, Evaluation of prognostic risk models for postoperative pulmonary complications in adult patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: a systematic review and international external validation cohort study, The Lancet Digital Health, Vol: 4, Pages: e520-e531, ISSN: 2589-7500

BackgroundStratifying risk of postoperative pulmonary complications after major abdominal surgery allows clinicians to modify risk through targeted interventions and enhanced monitoring. In this study, we aimed to identify and validate prognostic models against a new consensus definition of postoperative pulmonary complications.MethodsWe did a systematic review and international external validation cohort study. The systematic review was done in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. We searched MEDLINE and Embase on March 1, 2020, for articles published in English that reported on risk prediction models for postoperative pulmonary complications following abdominal surgery. External validation of existing models was done within a prospective international cohort study of adult patients (≥18 years) undergoing major abdominal surgery. Data were collected between Jan 1, 2019, and April 30, 2019, in the UK, Ireland, and Australia. Discriminative ability and prognostic accuracy summary statistics were compared between models for the 30-day postoperative pulmonary complication rate as defined by the Standardised Endpoints in Perioperative Medicine Core Outcome Measures in Perioperative and Anaesthetic Care (StEP-COMPAC). Model performance was compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCC).FindingsIn total, we identified 2903 records from our literature search; of which, 2514 (86·6%) unique records were screened, 121 (4·8%) of 2514 full texts were assessed for eligibility, and 29 unique prognostic models were identified. Nine (31·0%) of 29 models had score development reported only, 19 (65·5%) had undergone internal validation, and only four (13·8%) had been externally validated. Data to validate six eligible models were collected in the international external validation cohort study. Data from 11 591 patients were available, with an overall

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2022, Locally recurrent rectal cancer according to a standardized MRI classification system: a systematic review of the literature, Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2077-0383

(1) Background: Classification of Locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) is not currently stand-ardized. The aim of this review was to evaluate pelvic LRRC according to the Beyond TME (BTME) classification system and to consider commonly associated primary tumour characteristics. (2) Methods: A systematic review of the literature prior to April 2020 was performed through elec-tronic searches of the Science Citation Index Expanded, EMBASE, MEDLINE and CENTRAL da-tabases. The primary outcome was to assess location and frequency of previously classified pelvic LRRC and translate this information into the BTME system. Secondary outcomes were assessing primary tumour characteristics. (3) Results: A total of 58 eligible studies classified 4558 sites of LRRC, most commonly found in the central compartment (18%), following anterior resection (44%), in patients with an ‘advanced’ primary tumour (63%) and following neoadjuvant radio-therapy (29%). Most patients also classified had a low rectal primary tumour. Lymph node status of the primary tumour leading to LRRC was comparable, with 52% node positive versus 48% node negative tumours. (4) Conclusion: This review evaluates the largest number of LRRCs to date using a single classification system. It has also highlighted the need for standardized reporting in order to optimise perioperative treatment planning.

Journal article

REACCT C, 2022, Post-operative functional outcomes in early age onset rectal cancer, Frontiers in Oncology, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 2234-943X

BackgroundImpairment of bowel, urogenital and fertility-related function in patients treated for rectal cancer is common. While the rate of rectal cancer in the young (<50 years) is rising, there is little data on functional outcomes in this group.MethodsThe REACCT international collaborative database was reviewed and data on eligible patients analysed. Inclusion criteria comprised patients with a histologically confirmed rectal cancer, <50 years of age at time of diagnosis and with documented follow-up including functional outcomes.ResultsA total of 1428 (n=1428) patients met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final analysis. Metastatic disease was present at diagnosis in 13%. Of these, 40% received neoadjuvant therapy and 50% adjuvant chemotherapy. The incidence of post-operative major morbidity was 10%. A defunctioning stoma was placed for 621 patients (43%); 534 of these proceeded to elective restoration of bowel continuity. The median follow-up time was 42 months. Of this cohort, a total of 415 (29%) reported persistent impairment of functional outcomes, the most frequent of which was bowel dysfunction (16%), followed by bladder dysfunction (7%), sexual dysfunction (4.5%) and infertility (1%).ConclusionA substantial proportion of patients with early-onset rectal cancer who undergo surgery report persistent impairment of functional status. Patients should be involved in the discussion regarding their treatment options and potential impact on quality of life. Functional outcomes should be routinely recorded as part of follow up alongside oncological parameters.

Journal article

Zaborowski AM, Abdile A, Adamina M, Aigner F, D'Allens L, Allmer C, Alvarez A, Anula R, Andric M, Atallah S, Bach S, Bala M, Barussaud M, Bausys A, Beggs A, Bellolio F, Bennett M-R, Bevan V, Biondo S, Bislenghi G, Bludau M, Brouwer N, Brown C, Bruns C, Buchanan DD, Buchwald P, Burger JWA, Burlov N, Campanelli M, Capdepont M, Carvello M, Chew H-H, Christoforidis D, Clark D, Climent M, Collinson R, Cologne KG, Contreras T, Croner R, Daniels IR, Dapri G, Davies J, Delrio P, Denost Q, Deutsch M, Dias A, D'Hoore A, Drozdov E, Duek D, Dunlop M, Dziki A, Edmundson A, Efetov S, El-Hussuna A, Elliot B, Emile S, Espin E, Evans M, Faes S, Faiz O, Figueiredo N, Fleming F, Foppa C, Fowler G, Frasson M, Forgan T, Frizelle F, Gadaev S, Gellona J, Glyn T, Goran B, Greenwood E, Guren MG, Guillon S, Gutlic I, Hahnloser D, Hampel H, Hanly A, Hasegawa H, Iversen LH, Hill A, Hill J, Hoch J, Hompes R, Hurtado L, Iaquinandi F, Imbrasaite U, Islam R, Jafari MD, Salido AJ, Toscano MJ, Kanemitsu Y, Karachun A, Karimuddin AA, Keller DS, Kelly J, Kennelly R, Khrykov G, Kocian P, Koh C, Kok N, Knight KA, Knol J, Kontovounisios C, Korner H, Krivokapic Z, Kronberger I, Kroon HM, Kryzauskas M, Kural S, Kusters M, Lakkis Z, Lankov T, Larson D, Lazar G, Lee K-Y, Lee SH, Lefevre JH, Lepisto A, Lieu C, Loi L, Lynch C, Maillou-Martinaud H, Maroli A, Martin S, Martling A, Matzel KE, Mayol J, McDermott F, Meurette G, Millan M, Mitteregger M, Moiseenko A, Monson JRT, Morarasu S, Moritani K, Moslein G, Munini M, Nahas C, Nahas S, Negoi I, Novikova A, Ocares M, Okabayashi K, Olkina A, Onate-Ocana L, Otero J, Ozen C, Pace U, Juliao GPS, Panaiotti L, Panis Y, Papamichael D, Patel S, Uriburu JCP, Peng S-L, Pera M, Perez RO, Petrov A, Pfeffer F, Phang TP, Poskus T, Pringle H, Proud D, Raguz I, Rama N, Rasheed S, Raval MJ, Rega D, Reissfelder C, Meneses JCR, Ris F, Riss S, Rodriguez-Zentner H, Roxburgh CS, Saklani A, Sammour T, Saraste D, Schneider M, Seishima R, Sekulic A, Seppala T, Sheahan K, Shlomina A, Sigiet al., 2022, Impact of microsatellite status in early-onset colonic cancer, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 109, Pages: 632-636, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Adamina M, Ademuyiwa A, Adisa A, Bhangu AA, Bravo AM, Cunha MF, Emile S, Ghosh D, Glasbey JC, Harris B, Keller D, Lawday S, Lederhuber H, Leventoglu S, Li E, Modolo MM, Mittal R, Mohan HM, Nepogodiev D, Parreno-Sacdalan MD, Pata F, Pockney P, Rutegard M, Simoes JFF, Smart N, Varghese C, Siaw-Acheampong K, Benson RA, Bywater E, Chaudhry D, Dawson BE, Evans JP, Gujjuri RR, Heritage E, Jones CS, Kamarajah SK, Khatri C, Khaw RA, Keatley JM, Knight A, Smart NJ, Minaya-Bravo A, Gallo G, Moug S, Di Saverio S, Vallance A, Vimalchandra D, Griffiths EA, Evans RPT, Townen P, Roberts K, McKay S, Isaac J, Satoi S, Edwards J, Coonar AS, Marchbank A, Caruana EJ, Layton GR, Patel A, Brunelli A, Ford S, Desai A, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Almond M, Tirotta F, Dumitra S, Kolias A, Price SJ, Fountain DM, Jenkinson MD, Hutchinson P, Marcus HJ, Piper RJ, Lippa L, Servadei F, Esene I, Freyschlag C, Neville I, Rosseau G, Schaller K, Demetriades AK, Robertson F, Alamri A, Shaw R, Schache AG, Winter SC, Ho M, Nankivell P, Biel JR, Batstone M, Ganly I, Vidya R, Wilkins A, Singh JK, Thekinkattil D, Sundar S, Fotopoulou C, Leung EY, Khan T, Chiva L, Sehouli J, Fagotti A, Cohen P, Gutelkin M, Ghebre R, Konney T, Pareja R, Bristow R, Dowdy S, Shylasree TS, Seenivasagam RK, Ng J, Fujiwar K, Stewart GD, Lamb B, Narahari K, McNeill A, Colquhoun A, McGrath JS, Bromage S, Barod R, Kasivisvanathan V, Klatte T, Abbott TEF, Abukhalaf S, Ademuyiwa AO, Agarwal A, Akkulak M, Alameer E, Alderson D, Alakaloko F, Albertsmeier M, Alser O, Alshaar M, Alshryda S, Arnaud AP, Augestad KM, Ayasra F, Azevedo J, Bankhead-Kendall BK, Barlow E, Beard D, Blanco-Colino R, Brar A, Breen KA, Bretherton C, Buarque IL, Burke J, Chaar M, Chakrabortee S, Christensen P, Cox D, Cukier M, Davidson GH, Drake TM, Edwards JG, Elhadi M, Farik S, Fitzgerald JE, Garmanova T, Gomes GMA, Grecinos G, Gruendl M, Halkias C, Harrison EM, Hisham I, Hutchinson PJ, Hwang S, Isik A, Jonker P, Kaafarani HMA, Kruijff S, Lawani I, Litvin A, Loehrer A, Lofet al., 2022, The impact of surgical delay on resectability of colorectal cancer: An international prospective cohort study, COLORECTAL DISEASE, Vol: 24, Pages: 708-726, ISSN: 1462-8910

Journal article

La Raja C, Foppa C, Maroli A, Kontovounisios C, Ben David N, Carvello M, Spinelli Aet al., 2022, Surgical outcomes of Turnbull-Cutait delayed coloanal anastomosis with pull-through versus immediate coloanal anastomosis with diverting stoma after total mesorectal excision for low rectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis, TECHNIQUES IN COLOPROCTOLOGY, Vol: 26, Pages: 603-613, ISSN: 1123-6337

Journal article

Robb H, Scrimgeour G, Boshier P, Przedlacka A, Balyasnikova S, Brown G, Bello F, Kontovounisios Cet al., 2022, The current and possible future role of 3D modelling within oesophagogastric surgery: a scoping review, SURGICAL ENDOSCOPY AND OTHER INTERVENTIONAL TECHNIQUES, Vol: 36, Pages: 5907-5920, ISSN: 0930-2794

Background3D reconstruction technology could revolutionise medicine. Within surgery, 3D reconstruction has a growing role in operative planning and procedures, surgical education and training as well as patient engagement. Whilst virtual and 3D printed models are already used in many surgical specialities, oesophagogastric surgery has been slow in their adoption. Therefore, the authors undertook a scoping review to clarify the current and future roles of 3D modelling in oesophagogastric surgery, highlighting gaps in the literature and implications for future research.MethodsA scoping review protocol was developed using a comprehensive search strategy based on internationally accepted guidelines and tailored for key databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Elsevier Scopus and ISI Web of Science). This is available through the Open Science Framework (osf.io/ta789) and was published in a peer-reviewed journal. Included studies underwent screening and full text review before inclusion. A thematic analysis was performed using pre-determined overarching themes: (i) surgical training and education, (ii) patient education and engagement, and (iii) operative planning and surgical practice. Where applicable, subthemes were generated.ResultsA total of 56 papers were included. Most research was low-grade with 88% (n = 49) of publications at or below level III evidence. No randomised control trials or systematic reviews were found. Most literature (86%, n = 48) explored 3D reconstruction within operative planning. These were divided into subthemes of pre-operative (77%, n = 43) and intra-operative guidance (9%, n = 5). Few papers reported on surgical training and education (14%, n = 8), and were evenly subcategorised into virtual reality simulation (7%, n = 4) and anatomical teaching (7%, n = 4). No studies utilising 3D modelling for patient engagement and education were found.ConclusionThe use

Journal article

Pellino G, Fuschillo G, Simillis C, Selvaggi L, Signoriello G, Vinci D, Kontovounisios C, Selvaggi F, Sciaudone Get al., 2022, Abdominal versus perineal approach for external rectal prolapse: systematic review with meta-analysis, BJS Open, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2474-9842

BackgroundExternal rectal prolapse (ERP) is a debilitating condition in which surgery plays an important role. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of abdominal approaches (AA) and perineal approaches (PA) to ERP.MethodsThis was a PRISMA-compliant systematic review with meta-analysis. Studies published between 1990 and 2021 were retrieved. The primary endpoint was recurrence at the last available follow-up. Secondary endpoints included factors associated with recurrence and function. All studies were assessed for bias using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale and Cochrane tool.ResultsFifteen studies involving 1611 patients (AA = 817; PA = 794) treated for ERP were included, three of which were randomized controlled trials (RCTs; 114 patients (AA = 54; PA = 60)). Duration of follow-up ranged from 12 to 82 months. Recurrence in non-randomized studies was 7.7 per cent in AA versus 20.1 per cent in PA (odds ratio (OR) 0.29, 95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 0.17 to 0.50; P < 0.001, I2 = 45 per cent). In RCTs, there was no significant difference (9.8 per cent versus 16.3 per cent, AA versus PA (OR 0.82, 95 per cent c.i. 0.29 to 2.37; P = 0.72, I2 = 0.0 per cent)). Age at surgery and duration of follow-up were risk factors for recurrence. Following AA, the recurrence rates were 10.1 per cent and 6.2 per cent in patients aged 65 years and older and less than 65 years of age, respectively (effect size [e.s.] 7.7, 95 per cent c.i. 4.5 to 11.5). Following PA, rates were 27 per cent and 16.3 per cent (e.s. 20.1, 95 per cent c.i. 13 to 28.2). Extending follow-up to at least 40 months increased the likelihood of recurrence. The median duration of hospital stay was 4.9 days after PA versus 7.2 days after AA. Overall, incontinence was less likely after AA (OR 0.32), but constipation occurred more frequently (OR 1.68). Most studies were retrospective, a

Journal article

Carvalho F, Rogers AC, Chang T-P, Chee Y, Subramaniam D, Pellino G, Hardy K, Kontovounisios C, Tekkis P, Rasheed S, London Colorectal Cancer Hub Network Collaboratorset al., 2022, Feasibility and usability of a regional hub model for colorectal cancer services during the COVID-19 pandemic, Updates in Surgery, Vol: 74, Pages: 619-628, ISSN: 2038-131X

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic produced unprecedented challenges, at a global level, in the provision of cancer care. With the ongoing need in the delivery of life-saving cancer treatment, the surgical management of patients with colorectal cancer required prompt significant transformation. The aim of this retrospective study is to report the outcome of a bespoke regional Cancer Hub model in the delivery of elective and essential colorectal cancer surgery, at the height of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. 168 patients underwent colorectal cancer surgery from April 1st to June 30th of 2020. Approximately 75% of patients operated upon underwent colonic resection, of which 47% were left-sided, 34% right-sided and 12% beyond total mesorectal excision surgeries. Around 79% of all resectional surgeries were performed via laparotomy, and the remainder 21%, robotically or laparoscopically. Thirty-day complication rate, for Clavien-Dindo IIIA and above, was 4.2%, and 30-day mortality rate was 0.6%. Re-admission rate, within 30 days post-discharge, was 1.8%, however, no patient developed COVID-19 specific complications post-operatively and up to 28 days post-discharge. The established Cancer Hub offered elective surgical care for patients with colorectal cancer in a centralised, timely and efficient manner, with acceptable post-operative outcomes and no increased risk of contracting COVID-19 during their inpatient stay. We offer a practical model of care that can be used when elective surgery "hubs" for streamlined delivery of elective care needs to be established in an expeditious fashion, either due to the COVID-19 pandemic or any other future pandemics.

Journal article

Kelly ME, 2022, Contemporary management of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer: views from the PelvEx collaborative, Cancers, Vol: 14, ISSN: 2072-6694

Pelvic exenteration is a complex operation performed for locally advanced and recurrent pelvic cancers. The goal of surgery is to achieve clear margins, therefore identifying adjacent or involved organs, bone, muscle, nerves and/or vascular structures that may need resection. While these extensive resections are potentially curative, they can be associated with substantial morbidity. Recently, there has been a move to centralize care to specialized units, as this facilitates better multidisciplinary care input. Advancements in pelvic oncology and surgical innovation have redefined the boundaries of pelvic exenterative surgery. Combined with improved neoadjuvant therapies, advances in diagnostics, and better reconstructive techniques have provided quicker recovery and better quality of life outcomes, with improved survival This article provides highlights of the current management of advanced pelvic cancers in terms of surgical strategy and potential future developments

Journal article

Zaborowski AM, Abdile A, Adamina M, Aigner F, D'Allens L, Allmer C, Anula R, Andric M, Atallah S, Bach S, Bala M, Barussaud M, Bausys A, Beggs A, Bellolio F, Bennett M-R, Berdinskikh A, Bevan V, Biondo S, Bislenghi G, Bludau M, Brouwer N, Brown C, Bruns C, Buchanan DD, Buchwald P, Burger JWA, Burlov N, Campanelli M, Capdepont M, Carvello M, Chew H-H, Christoforidis D, Clark D, Climent M, Collinson R, Cologne KG, Contreras T, Croner R, Daniels I, Dapri G, Davies J, Delrio P, Denost Q, Deutsch M, Dias A, Drozdov E, Duek D, Dunlop M, Dziki A, Edmundson A, Efetov S, El-Hussuna A, Elliott B, Emile S, Espin-Basany E, Evans M, Faes S, Faiz O, Figueiredo N, Fleming F, Foppa C, Fowler G, Frasson M, Forgan T, Frizelle F, Gadaev S, Gellona J, Glyn T, Goran B, Greenwood E, Guren MG, Guillon S, Gutlic I, Hahnloser D, Hampel H, Hanly A, Hasegawa H, Iversen LH, Hill A, Hill J, Hoch J, Hompes R, Hurtado L, Iaquinandi F, Imbrasaite U, Islam R, Jafari MD, Kanemitsu Y, Karachun A, Karimuddin AA, Keller DS, Kelly J, Kennelly R, Khrykov G, Kocian P, Koh C, Kok N, Knight KA, Knol J, Kontovounisios C, Korner H, Krivokapic Z, Kronberger I, MaartenKroon H, Kryzauskas M, Kural S, Kusters M, Lakkis Z, Lankov T, Larson D, Lee K-Y, Lee SH, Lepisto A, Lieu C, Loi L, Lynch C, Maillou-Martinaud H, Maroli A, Martin ST, Martling A, Matzel KE, Mayol J, McDermott F, Meurette G, Millan M, Mitteregger M, Moiseenko A, Monson JRT, Morarasu S, Moritani K, Munini M, Nahas C, Nahas S, Negoi I, Novikova A, Ocares M, Okabayashi K, Olkina A, Onate-Ocana L, Otero J, Ozen C, Pace U, Sao Juliao GP, Panaiotti L, Panis Y, Papamichael D, Patel S, Peng S-L, Pera M, Perez RO, Petrov A, Pfeffer F, Phang TP, Poskus T, Pringle H, Proud D, Raguz I, Rama N, Rasheed S, Raval MJ, Rega D, Reissfelder C, Meneses JCR, Ris F, Riss S, Rodriguez-Zentner H, Roxburgh CS, Saklani A, Sammour T, Saraste D, Schneider M, Seishima R, Sekulic A, Seppala T, Sheahan K, Shlomina A, Sica G, Singnomklao T, Siragusa L, Smart N, Solis-Pena A, Spinet al., 2022, Microsatellite instability in young patients with rectal cancer: molecular findings and treatment response, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 109, Pages: 251-255, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Tekkis NP, Richmond-Smith R, Pellino G, Kontovounisios Cet al., 2022, Facilitating the adoption and evolution of digital technologies through re-conceptualization, Frontiers in Surgery, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2296-875X

Background: The NHS has been making steps toward greater efficiency and cutting costs to maintain quality of care despite constraints, but without innovation the NHS will not be able to meet its increasing financial demands. The purpose of this article is to analyse a single potentially transformative technology's path of adoption in the NHS [3D printing (3DP)].Methods: Analysis of 3DP and its current value propositions. Re-conceptualization of the technology to gain insights into these value propositions and identify the capabilities it may provide. Analysis of previous business models to identify where this value is not fully captured and development of a new business model, followed by exploration of benefits and potential limitations of this new model.Results: 3D printing applications can be broadly categorized into anatomical modeling, implants, and tools. Conceptualizing 3D imaging using the layered architecture model suggests the potential of 3DP to evolve the current imaging and modeling infrastructure of the NHS, and as such should be adopted to facilitate this potential.Conclusion: 3D printing is an innovation with large potential for generativity, and it is important that it is integrated at a level that could both stimulate and communicate its benefits. Re-conceptualization identified a backbone within the NHS that could facilitate it as a point of entry, and the most successful installations have been through this channel. However, progress on the frontier is currently limited by both physical and organizational boundaries, the resolution of which is paramount for the current and future success of this technology.

Journal article

Carbone F, Chee Y, Rasheed S, Cunningham D, Bhogal RH, Jiao L, Tekkis P, Kontovounisios Cet al., 2022, Which surgical strategy for colorectal cancer with synchronous hepatic metastases provides the best outcome? A comparison between primary first, liver first and simultaneous approach, UPDATES IN SURGERY, Vol: 74, Pages: 451-465, ISSN: 2038-131X

Journal article

Przedlacka A, Pellino G, Fletcher J, Bello F, Tekkis PP, Kontovounisios Cet al., 2021, Current and future role of three-dimensional modelling technology in rectal cancer surgery: a systematic review, World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol: 13, Pages: 1754-1769, ISSN: 1948-9366

BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D) modelling technology translates the patient-specific anatomical information derived from two-dimensional radiological images into virtual or physical 3D models, which more closely resemble the complex environment encountered during surgery. It has been successfully applied to surgical planning and navigation, as well as surgical training and patient education in several surgical specialties, but its uptake lags behind in colorectal surgery. Rectal cancer surgery poses specific challenges due to the complex anatomy of the pelvis, which is difficult to comprehend and visualise. AIM: To review the current and emerging applications of the 3D models, both virtual and physical, in rectal cancer surgery. METHODS: Medline/PubMed, Embase and Scopus databases were searched using the keywords "rectal surgery", "colorectal surgery", "three-dimensional", "3D", "modelling", "3D printing", "surgical planning", "surgical navigation", "surgical education", "patient education" to identify the eligible full-text studies published in English between 2001 and 2020. Reference list from each article was manually reviewed to identify additional relevant papers. The conference abstracts, animal and cadaveric studies and studies describing 3D pelvimetry or radiotherapy planning were excluded. Data were extracted from the retrieved manuscripts and summarised in a descriptive way. The manuscript was prepared and revised in accordance with PRISMA 2009 checklist. RESULTS: Sixteen studies, including 9 feasibility studies, were included in the systematic review. The studies were classified into four categories: feasibility of the use of 3D modelling technology in rectal cancer surgery, preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation, surgical education and surgical device design. Thirteen studies used virtual models, one 3D printed model and 2 both types of mod

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2021, Demographics and incidence of Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in people living in high HIV prevalence geographical areas, Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN: 1368-4973

ObjectivesAnal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (ASCC) is an uncommon cancer that is rapidly increasing in incidence. HIV is a risk factor in the development of ASCC and it is thought that the rapidly increasing incidence in men is related to increasing numbers of people living with HIV (PLWH). We undertook a population-based study comparing the demographics and incidence of ASCC in patients residing high HIV prevalence areas in England to patients living in average HIV prevalence areas in England MethodsThis is a cross-sectional study following the “strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology” STROBE statement. Demographic data and incidence rates of ASCC within Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) between 2013 and 2018 were extracted from the Cancer Outcomes and Services Dataset (COSD). CCGs were then stratified by HIV prevalence from data given by Public Health England and high HIV prevalence geographical areas were compared with average HIV geographical areas. ResultsPatients in high HIV areas were more likely to be young and male with higher levels of social deprivation. Incidence rates in men between 2013 and 2017 were higher in high HIV areas than average HIV areas with a rapidly increasing incidence rates in early-stage disease and a 79.1% reduction in incidence of metastatic Stage 4 disease. Whereas women in high HIV areas had lower ASCC incidence than the national average and a low incidence of early-stage disease, however metastatic disease in women had quintupled in incidence in high HIV areas since 2013.ConclusionsPatients presenting with ASCC in high HIV geographical areas have different demographics to patients presenting in average HIV geographical areas. This may be related to screening programmes for PLWH in high HIV areas.

Journal article

McLean KA, Kamarajah SK, Chaudhry D, Gujjuri RR, Raubenheimer K, Trout I, AlAmeer E, Creagh-Brown B, Harrison EM, Nepogodiev D, Roslani AC, Li E, Pata F, Ramos-De la Medina A, van Ramshorst GH, Sayyed R, Simoes J, Smart N, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, Khaw RA, Ahmed W, Akhbari M, Baker D, Borakati A, Mills E, Murray V, Thavayogan R, Yasin I, Glasbey J, Ridley W, Sarrami M, Zhang G, Egoroff N, Pockney P, Richards T, Edwards M, Lee M, Pinkney T, Pearse R, Vohra R, Sohrabi C, Jamieson A, Nguyen M, Rahman A, English C, Tincknell L, Kakodkar P, Kwek I, Punjabi N, Burns J, Varghese S, Erotocritou M, McGuckin S, Vayalapra S, Dominguez E, Moneim J, Bhatia S, Kouli O, Salehi M, Tan HL, Yoong A, Zhu L, Seale B, Nowinka Z, Patel N, Chrisp B, Harris J, Maleyko I, Muneeb F, Gough M, James CE, Skan O, Chowdhury A, Rebuffa N, Khan H, Down B, Fatimah HQ, Siaw-Acheampong K, Benson RA, Bywater E, Dawson BE, Evans JP, Heritage E, Jones CS, Khatri C, Keatley JM, Knight A, Lawday S, Mann HS, Marson EJ, Mckay SC, Mills EC, Pellino G, Picciochi M, Taylor EH, Tiwari A, Simoes JFF, Trout IM, Venn ML, Wilkin RJW, Smart NJ, Minaya-Bravo A, Gallo G, Moug S, Di Saverio S, Vallance A, Vimalchandran D, Griffiths EA, Evans RPT, Townend P, Roberts K, McKay S, Isaac J, Satoi S, Edwards J, Coonar AS, Marchbank A, Caruana EJ, Layton GR, Patel A, Brunelli A, Ford S, Desai A, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Almond M, Tirotta F, Dumitra S, Kolias A, Price SJ, Fountain DM, Jenkinson MD, Hutchinson P, Marcus HJ, Piper RJ, Lippa L, Servadei F, Esene I, Freyschlag C, Neville I, Rosseau G, Schaller K, Demetriades AK, Robertson F, Alamri A, Shaw R, Schache AG, Winter SC, Ho M, Nankivell P, Biel JR, Batstone M, Ganly I, Vidya R, Wilkins A, Singh JK, Thekinkattil D, Sundar S, Fotopoulou C, Leung E, Khan T, Chiva L, Sehouli J, Fagotti A, Cohen P, Gutelkin M, Ghebre R, Konney T, Pareja R, Bristow R, Dowdy S, Rajkumar STS, Ng J, Fujiwara K, Stewart GD, Lamb B, Narahari K, McNeill A, Colquhoun A, McGrath J, Bromage S, Barod R, Kasiviset al., 2021, Death following pulmonary complications of surgery before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 108, Pages: 1448-1464, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Glasbey J, Ademuyiwa A, Adisa A, AlAmeer E, Arnaud AP, Ayasra F, Azevedo J, Minaya-Bravo A, Costas-Chavarri A, Edwards J, Elhadi M, Fiore M, Fotopoulou C, Gallo G, Ghosh D, Griffiths EA, Harrison E, Hutchinson P, Lawani I, Lawday S, Lederhuber H, Leventoglu S, Li E, Gomes GMA, Mann H, Marson EJ, Martin J, Mazingi D, McLean K, Modolo M, Moore R, Morton D, Ntirenganya F, Pata F, Picciochi M, Pockney P, Ramos-De la Medina A, Roberts K, Roslani AC, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam R, Shaw R, Simões JFF, Smart N, Stewart GD, Sullivan R, Sundar S, Tabiri S, Taylor EH, Vidya R, Nepogodiev D, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, McLean K, Nepogodiev D, Harrison E, Bhangu AA, Nepogodiev D, Siaw-Acheampong K, Benson RA, Bywater E, Chaudhry D, Dawson BE, Evans JP, Glasbey JC, Gujjuri RR, Heritage E, Jones CS, Kamarajah SK, Khatri C, Khaw RA, Keatley JM, Knight A, Lawday S, Li E, Mann HS, Marson EJ, McLean KA, Mckay SC, Mills EC, Pellino G, Picciochi M, Taylor EH, Tiwari A, Simoes JFF, Trout IM, Venn ML, Wilkin RJW, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, Smart NJ, Minaya-Bravo A, Evans JP, Gallo G, Moug S, Pata F, Pockney P, Di Saverio S, Vallance A, Vimalchandran D, Griffiths EA, Kamarajah SK, Evans RPT, Townend P, Roberts K, McKay S, Isaac J, Satoi S, Edwards J, Coonar AS, Marchbank A, Caruana EJ, Layton GR, Patel A, Brunelli A, Ford S, Desai A, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Almond M, Tirotta F, Dumitra S, Kolias A, Price SJ, Fountain DM, Jenkinson MD, Hutchinson P, Marcus HJ, Piper RJ, Lippa L, Servadei F, Esene I, Freyschlag C, Neville I, Rosseau G, Schaller K, Demetriades AK, Robertson F, Alamri A, Shaw R, Schache AG, Winter SC, Ho M, Nankivell P, Rey Biel J, Batstone M, Ganly I, Vidya R, Wilkins A, Singh JK, Thekinkattil D, Sundar S, Fotopoulou C, Leung EYL, Khan T, Chiva L, Sehouli J, Fagotti A, Cohen P, Gutelkin M, Ghebre R, Konney T, Pareja R, Bristow R, Dowdy S, Shylasree TS, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam R, Ng J, Fujiwara K, Stewart GD, Lamb B, Narahari K, McNeill A, Colquhoun A, McGrath JS, Bromage S, Barod R, Kasivisvaet al., 2021, Effect of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on planned cancer surgery for 15 tumour types in 61 countries: an international, prospective, cohort study, The Lancet Oncology, Vol: 22, Pages: 1507-1517, ISSN: 1470-2045

BackgroundSurgery is the main modality of cure for solid cancers and was prioritised to continue during COVID-19 outbreaks. This study aimed to identify immediate areas for system strengthening by comparing the delivery of elective cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic in periods of lockdown versus light restriction.MethodsThis international, prospective, cohort study enrolled 20 006 adult (≥18 years) patients from 466 hospitals in 61 countries with 15 cancer types, who had a decision for curative surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic and were followed up until the point of surgery or cessation of follow-up (Aug 31, 2020). Average national Oxford COVID-19 Stringency Index scores were calculated to define the government response to COVID-19 for each patient for the period they awaited surgery, and classified into light restrictions (index <20), moderate lockdowns (20–60), and full lockdowns (>60). The primary outcome was the non-operation rate (defined as the proportion of patients who did not undergo planned surgery). Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to explore the associations between lockdowns and non-operation. Intervals from diagnosis to surgery were compared across COVID-19 government response index groups. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04384926.FindingsOf eligible patients awaiting surgery, 2003 (10·0%) of 20 006 did not receive surgery after a median follow-up of 23 weeks (IQR 16–30), all of whom had a COVID-19-related reason given for non-operation. Light restrictions were associated with a 0·6% non-operation rate (26 of 4521), moderate lockdowns with a 5·5% rate (201 of 3646; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·81, 95% CI 0·77–0·84; p<0·0001), and full lockdowns with a 15·0% rate (1775 of 11 827; HR 0·51, 0·50–0·53; p<0·0001). In sensitivity analyses, including adjustment for SARS-CoV-2 case notif

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2021, Towards standardisation of technique for en bloc sacrectomy for locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer, Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2077-0383

Treatment strategies for advanced or recurrent rectal cancer have evolved such that the ultimate surgical goal to achieve a cure is complete pathological clearance. To achieve this where the sacrum is involved, en bloc sacrectomy is the current standard of care. Sacral resection is technically challenging and has been described; however, the technique has yet to be streamlined across units. This comprehensive review aims to outline the surgical approach to en bloc sacrectomy for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer, with standardisation of the operative steps of the procedure and to discuss options that enhance the technique.

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2021, The current and possible future role of 3D modelling within oesophagogastric surgery: a scoping review protocol, BMJ Open, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-4, ISSN: 2044-6055

IntroductionThree-dimensional (3D) reconstruction describes the generation of either virtual or physically printed anatomically accurate 3D models from two-dimensional (2D) medical images. Their implementation has revolutionised medical practice. Within surgery, key applications include growing roles in operative planning and procedures, surgical education and training as well as patient engagement and education. In comparison to other surgical specialties, oesophagogastric surgery has been slow in their adoption of this technology. Herein the authors outline a scoping review protocol that aims to analyse the current role of 3D modelling in oesophagogastric surgery and highlight any unexplored avenues for future research. Methods and AnalysisThe protocol was generated using internationally accepted methodological frameworks. A succinct primary question was devised, and a comprehensive search strategy developed for key databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Elsevier Scopus and ISI Web of Science). These were searched from their inception to 1/6/2020. Reference lists will be reviewed by hand and grey literature identified using OpenGrey and Grey Literature Report. The protocol was registered to the Open Science Framework (osf.io/ta789). Two independent reviewers will screen titles, abstracts and perform full text reviews for study selection. There will be no methodological quality assessment to ensure a full thematic analysis is possible. A data charting tool will be created by the investigatory team. Results will be analysed to generate descriptive numerical tabular results and a thematic analysis performed. Ethics and Dissemination Ethical approval was not required for the collection and analysis of the published data. The scoping review report will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and international conferences.Registration detailsThe scoping review protocol has been registered on the Open Science Framework (osf.io/ta789)

Journal article

Kontovounisios C, 2021, Perioperative optimization in complex abdominal wall hernias: Delphi consensus statement, BJS Open, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 2474-9842

Background The incidence of incisional hernia after major abdominal surgery via a midline laparotomy is 20–41 percent with short-term follow-up, and over 50 per cent in those surviving an abdominal catastrophe.Abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) requires complex operations, often involving mesh resection,management of scarred skin, fistula takedown, component separation or flap reconstruction. Patientstend to have more complex conditions, with multiple co-morbidities predisposing them to a viciouscycle of complications and, subsequently, hernia recurrence. Currently there appears to be variance inperioperative practice and minimal guidance globally. The aim of this Delphi consensus was to providea clear benchmark of care for the preoperative assessment and perioperative optimization of patientsundergoing AWR.MethodsThe Delphi method was used to achieve consensus from invited experts in the field of AWR. Thirtytwo hernia surgeons from recognized hernia societies globally took part. The process included tworounds of anonymous web-based voting with response analysis and formal feedback, concluding witha live round of voting followed by discussion at an international conference. Consensus for a strongrecommendation was achieved with 80 per cent agreement, and a weak recommendation with 75 percent agreement. ResultsConsensus was obtained on 52 statements including surgical assessment, preoperative assessment,perioperative optimization, multidisciplinary team and decision-making, and quality-of-life assessment.Forty-six achieved over 80 per cent agreement; 14 statements achieved over 95 per cent agreement.ConclusionClear consensus recommendations from a global group of experts in the AWR field are presented inthis study. These should be used as a baseline for surgeons and centres managing abdominal wallhernias and performing complex AWR.TOC summary: The Delphi method was used to provide consensus statements for preoperativeassessment and perioperative optimization

Journal article

Rottoli M, Pellino G, Tanzanu M, Baldi C, Frontali A, Carvello M, Foppa C, Kontovounisios C, Tekkis P, Colombo F, Sancho-Muriel J, Frasson M, Danelli P, Celentano V, Spinelli A, Panis Y, Sampietro GM, Poggioli Get al., 2021, Inflammatory bowel disease patients requiring surgery can be treated in referral centres regardless of the COVID-19 status of the hospital: results of a multicentric European study during the first COVID-19 outbreak (COVIBD-Surg) (Jun, 10.1007/s13304-021-01119-y, 2021), Updates in Surgery, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 2038-131X

Journal article

Brogden DRL, Lupi MEE, Warren OJ, Kontovounisios C, Mills SCet al., 2021, Comparing and contrasting clinical consensus and guidelines for anal intraepithelial neoplasia in different geographical regions, Updates in Surgery, Vol: 73, Pages: 2047-2058, ISSN: 2038-131X

Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (ASCC) is an uncommon cancer with a recognised precursor Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN). Although there are consistent evidence-based guidelines for the management of ASCC, historically this has not been the case for AIN and as a result there have been geographical variations in the recommendations for the treatment of AIN. More recently there have been updates in the literature to the recommendations for the management of AIN. To assess whether we are now closer to achieving an international consensus, we have completed a systematic scoping review of available guidelines for the screening, treatment and follow-up of AIN as a precursor to ASCC. MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for available clinical guidelines endorsed by a recognised clinical society that included recommendations on either the screening, treatment or follow-up of AIN. Nine clinical guidelines from three geographical areas were included. The most recent guidelines agreed that screening for AIN in high-risk patients and follow-up after treatment was necessary but there was less consensus on the modality of screening. Six Guidelines recommended the treatment of high-grade AIN and four guidelines describe a follow-up protocol of patients diagnosed with AIN. There appears to be increasing consensus on the treatment and follow-up of patients despite a poor evidence base. There is still significant discrepancy in guidance on the method to identify patients at risk of ASCC and AIN despite consensus between geographical regions on which patient subgroups are at the highest risk.

Journal article

Zaborowski AM, Abdile A, Adamina M, Aigner F, d'Allens L, Allmer C, Alvarez A, Anula R, Andric M, Atallah S, Bach S, Bala M, Barussaud M, Bausys A, Bebington B, Beggs A, Bellolio F, Bennett M-R, Berdinskikh A, Bevan V, Biondo S, Bislenghi G, Bludau M, Boutall A, Brouwer N, Brown C, Bruns C, Buchanan DD, Buchwald P, Burger JWA, Burlov N, Campanelli M, Capdepont M, Carvello M, Chew H-H, Christoforidis D, Clark D, Climent M, Cologne KG, Contreras T, Croner R, Daniels IR, Dapri G, Davies J, Delrio P, Denost Q, Deutsch M, Dias A, D'Hoore A, Drozdov E, Duek D, Dunlop M, Dziki A, Edmundson A, Efetov S, El-Hussuna A, Elliot B, Emile S, Espin E, Evans M, Faes S, Faiz O, Fleming F, Foppa C, Fowler G, Frasson M, Figueiredo N, Forgan T, Frizelle F, Gadaev S, Gellona J, Glyn T, Gong J, Goran B, Greenwood E, Guren MG, Guillon S, Gutlic I, Hahnloser D, Hampel H, Hanly A, Hasegawa H, Iversen LH, Hill A, Hill J, Hoch J, Hoffmeister M, Hompes R, Hurtado L, Iaquinandi F, Imbrasaite U, Islam R, Jafari MD, Kanemitsu Y, Karachun A, Karimuddin AA, Keller DS, Kelly J, Kennelly R, Khrykov G, Kocian P, Koh C, Kok N, Knight KA, Knol J, Kontovounisios C, Korner H, Krivokapic Z, Kronberger I, Kroon HM, Kryzauskas M, Kural S, Kusters M, Lakkis Z, Lankov T, Larson D, Lazar G, Lee K-Y, Lee SH, Lefevre JH, Lepisto A, Lieu C, Loi L, Lynch C, Maillou-Martinaud H, Maroli A, Martin S, Martling A, Matzel KE, Mayol J, McDermott F, Meurette G, Millan M, Mitteregger M, Moiseenko A, Monson JRT, Morarasu S, Moritani K, Moslein G, Munini M, Nahas C, Nahas S, Negoi I, Novikova A, Ocares M, Okabayashi K, Olkina A, Onate-Ocana L, Otero J, Ozen C, Pace U, Juliao GPS, Panaiotti L, Panis Y, Papamichael D, Park J, Patel S, Uriburu JCP, Pera M, Perez RO, Petrov A, Pfeffer F, Phang PT, Poskus T, Pringle H, Proud D, Raguz I, Rama N, Rasheed S, Raval MJ, Rega D, Reissfelder C, Meneses JCR, Ris F, Riss S, Rodriguez-Zentner H, Roxburgh CS, Saklani A, Salido AJ, Sammour T, Saraste D, Schneider M, Seishima R, Sekulic A, Sepet al., 2021, Characteristics of Early-Onset vs Late-Onset Colorectal Cancer A Review, JAMA SURGERY, Vol: 156, Pages: 865-874, ISSN: 2168-6254

Journal article

Fadel MG, Iskandarani M, Cuddihy J, Jones I, Collins D, Kontovounisios Cet al., 2021, Colonic perforation following major burns: Experience from a burns center and a systematic review, BURNS, Vol: 47, Pages: 1241-1251, ISSN: 0305-4179

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