Imperial College London

DrCelineMougenot

Faculty of EngineeringDyson School of Design Engineering

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8166c.mougenot

 
 
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Location

 

225ObservatorySouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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34 results found

Taoka Y, Kagohashi K, Mougenot C, 2021, A cross-cultural study of co-design: the impact of power distance on group dynamics in Japan, CoDesign, Vol: 17, Pages: 22-49, ISSN: 1571-0882

This study explores the characteristics of collaboration between people with Japanese value orientation in co-design workshops. We define co-design as an approach where designers collaborate with non-designers to design new products or services. This research investigates the effect of culture and value orientation on co-design between designers and non-designers in a Japanese context.Through interviews with four professional designers, we identified that the participation of Japanese non-designers in a co-design workshop might be hindered by the presence of an expert, who is perceived as a person in a higher social position. With 20 subjects, we experimentally investigated the impact of power distance on collaboration. European and Japanese groups of non-designers generated and discussed ideas in two conditions – with or without a professional designer in the group. Through behaviour and speech analysis, we assessed the quality of collaboration within the group. Depending on their power distance score, the contributions of participants were affected differently by the presence of a professional designer. Unlike in the European groups, the presence of a designer in a Japanese group created a hierarchical structure that hindered the participation of non-designers. This work is expected to support the development of co-design methods adapted to their cultural contexts.

Journal article

Maurya S, Mougenot C, Takeda Y, 2021, Impact of Mixed Reality implementation on early-stage interactive-product design process, Journal of Engineering Design, Vol: 32, Pages: 1-27, ISSN: 0954-4828

This article proposes a novel approach towards quick concept generation and validation of interactive-product behaviours. When designing for user-product interactions, designers have to consider spatial and behavioural elements besides form/tangible aspects and perform quick-validation of the generated concepts often done through functional prototyping at later design stages. As a result, the designed-outcomes often depend on parameters like designer’s familiarity with the design tools used, the level of fidelity achieved while prototyping and the frequency of design-iterations, limiting a thorough-exploration of concept-space and outcomes’ creativity at the early design stages. This research targets such dependencies and non-creative hindrances at concept generation stage through a Mixed Reality implementation. This work establishes requirements for creating a suitable design-tool and presents a proof-of-concept use-case. A design task to ideate, create and revise concepts of playful product-behaviours swiftly was performed to assess the impact of the implemented method. In an empirical study, a broader exploration of solution-space and an overall improvement in creative output-flow was observed when compared to the design-outcomes in the traditional storyboard design approach. Though the implemented design-tool’s unfamiliarity and capability presented a challenge, a significant increase in usage of iterative concept-design behaviour was observed throughout the study.

Journal article

Baker MJ, Detienne F, Mougenot C, Corvin T, Pennington Met al., 2020, Argumentation, Eureka and emotion: an analysis of group projects in creative design training, Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Vol: 26, ISSN: 2210-6561

Creativity training has been generally based on avoiding critique during idea generation, although benefits of argumentation have been shown during idea selection and elaboration. The research reported here aims to understand how argumentative interactions involving role-play, with subsequent group reflection on them, contribute to collaborative creative design projects. The study was carried within a specialised Masters course at the Royal College of Art (London), organised jointly with Imperial College London, and focuses on analysing group reflection sessions of two groups of students whose on-going project was initially defined as “communication by touch”. Results showed that although students reported difficulties in playing argumentative roles that were not aligned with their personal views, their debates enabled them to arrive at “Eureka!” moments with respect to better grounded and precise definitions of their project concepts. We highlight the complex ways in which emotions circulate with respect to “Eureka!” moments, role-play and grounding. Given differences in ways that groups played out their assigned argumentative roles, we conclude that role play debate and group reflection on it need to be applied and considered as a whole in creative design training.

Journal article

Valk S, Mougenot C, 2020, Generative boundary objects as integral parts of framing in design and bioscience collaborations, DESIGN 2020, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 1135-1144, ISSN: 2633-7762

Collaborations between design engineers and bioscientists offer novel opportunities that could help solving some of the biggest challenges organisations and societies are facing. Combining design and bioscience has the potential to create responsible and desirable products/services, however such ventures come with challenges rising from boundaries between practices. This research explores boundary objects as sources of framing in multidisciplinary collaborations. The results are based on a descriptive study with synthetic biologists and design engineers working on an innovation-driven task.

Conference paper

Nguyen M, Mougenot C, 2020, Dimensions of multidisciplinary collaboration: a comparative literature review within design context, DESIGN 2020, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 1335-1344, ISSN: 2633-7762

In this paper, we review empirical studies of multidisciplinary collaboration in design and innovation activities. From 200 papers, we selected 17 for a meta-synthesis review. When revisited and compared, they present common themes and dichotomy in findings. This literature review discusses such diversity, offering a methodological critique of unclear areas. Four emerged themes were identified: (1) Knowledge diversity, (2) Trust, (3) Barrier and (4) Jargon and communication, providing perspectives for further research on how online collaboration will influence multidisciplinary team processes.

Conference paper

Haritaipan L, Saijo M, Mougenot C, 2019, Impact of technical information in magic-based inspiration tools on novice designers, International Journal of Technology and Design Education, Vol: 29, Pages: 1153-1177, ISSN: 0957-7572

Journal article

Valk S, Maudet N, Mougenot C, 2019, Exploring how boundary objects can support multidisciplinary design and science collaboration, IASDR 2019, Publisher: IASDR

In order to solve complex issues, professionals from different fields of expertise increasingly collaborate across domains. These collaborations require meaningful and efficient processes, particularly when design approaches and scientific knowledge is combined.Based on there view of existing literature on the role of incidental learning in ideation and boundary objects in multidisciplinary team creativity, it can be proposed that knowledge sharing can support collective creativity.This approachwas tested in a preliminary study of a collaborative creative task withpairs of design engineers and bio-scientists. Four pairs wereasked to jointly discuss a healthcare-centred innovation brief,and generate novel ideas based on their own expertise. The findings show that boundary objects supportknowledge sharing across disciplinesin creative collaborations-in thiscase, design engineering and synthetic biology.While strong role asymmetry was observed, it has been found that boundary objects are instrumental in ensuring both parties participate effectively in the creative session. In the study, designers were found to be steeringthe conversationsby generating boundary objectsmore frequently than scientists (66% of total number vs. 34%)and sharing knowledge on the design process withthem.This initial study willlater inform the development of a toolkit that aims to support science and design collaboration process.

Conference paper

Maurya S, Takeda Y, Mougenot C, 2019, Enabling designers to generate concepts of interactive product behaviours: a mixed reality design approach, International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED 2019), Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 1933-1942

To design interactive behaviours for their products designers/makers have to use high fidelity tools like ‘electronic prototyping kits’, involving sensors and programming to incorporate interactions in their products and are dependent on availability of hardware. Not every designer is comfortable using such tools to ideate and test their concept ideas, eventually slowing them down in the process. Thus, there is a need for a design tool that reduces dependence on complex components of such tools while exploring new concepts for product design at an early stage. In this work, we propose a Mixed Reality system that we developed to simulate interactive behaviours of products using designed visual interaction blocks. The system is implemented in three stages: idea generation, creating interactions and revision of interactive behaviours. The implemented virtual scenario showed to elicit high motivation and appeal among users resulting in inventive and creative design experience at the same time. As a result, designers will be able to create and revise their interaction-behavioural design concepts virtually with relative ease, resulting in higher concept generation and their validation.

Conference paper

Valk S, Mougenot C, 2019, Towards creativity stimulating design intervention for multidisciplinary innovation teams, International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED 2019), Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 239-248

The aim of our research is to stimulate cross disciplinary design collaboration to improve innovation processes in product and service design domain. We focus on the intersection of biotechnology and design as this field poses great challenges and opportunities for innovation, and it has received little attention in light of technological advancements of digital goods over the past decades. Experimental studies in the area expose challenging interactions, rising from lack of common vocabulary and preconceptions. Organisational management studies suggest that creativity is a prerequisite for innovation in group processes. As such, we are interested in enhancing collective creativity. Numerous studies investigate external creativity triggers, however only on individual level. Our review suggests that external triggers can be effective when the task is problem solving or styling, but ambiguous goals like innovation require stimulation of intrinsic triggers, such as group incidental learning and tacit knowledge. To explain this, we propose a hypothetical innovation approach, that draws attention to cognitive stimulation methods leading to creativity in multidisciplinary teams.

Conference paper

Haritaipan L, Mougenot C, Saijo M, 2019, How professional designers use magic-based inspirations: development of a usage guideline and analysis of impact on design process, International Journal on Interactive Design and Manufacturing, Vol: 13, Pages: 659-671, ISSN: 1955-2513

To support the introduction of magic in product interaction design, magic effects together with technical clues is shown to be effective inspirations for ‘creative and practical’ products in novice designers. In this paper, we aim to develop a guideline to use the magic-based inspiration cards effectively for novice designers. To do this, six professional designers with three levels of design experiences were invited: junior (2 years), intermediate (7 years), and senior (more than 12 years). The verbal protocol analysis revealed that when providfed with the cards, the designers produced more ideas and concerned more about expected behavior of products. On the other hand, design experience negatively impact fluidity of ideas. Our findings suggested that design process is correlated with fluidity and elaboration, but not originality and feasibility. Finally, a guideline on how to use the magic-based tool effectively is developed based on the approaches carried by professional designers.

Journal article

Maurya S, Arai K, Moriya K, Arrighi P-A, Mougenot CJMet al., 2019, A mixed reality tool for end-users participation in early creative design tasks, International Journal on Interactive Design and Manufacturing, Vol: 13, Pages: 163-182, ISSN: 1955-2505

While mixed prototyping has proved to be effective for the assessment of prototypes, this research aims to explore the use of mixed prototyping for the generation of early prototypes. To satisfy end-user’s needs, new products need to be designed with an early integration of end-user requirements. An efficient way to achieve this is to directly integrate the end-users in the design process and give them an intelligible and interactive tool to perform specific design tasks. Current interactive tools to integrate end-users in the design process provide either a high level of immersion (e.g. CAVE) or a high level of control over the virtual prototype (e.g. configurators). We designed a new mixed reality design tool which simultaneously allows end-users to be immersed in a virtual environment (immersion) and to interact with a virtual prototype and to modify it (control), resulting in effective end user-interactions. In two design use-case scenarios, we assessed the end-user experience and satisfaction while using the tool and we also evaluated the impact of the tool on the creative process and the design outcomes. The findings show that, when users are provided with a tool that allows to directly perform design tasks and modify a virtual prototype, as compared to when they have no control, they are more engaged in the design tasks, more satisfied with the design process and they produce more creative outcomes.

Journal article

Arrighi PA, Mougenot C, 2019, Towards user empowerment in product design: a mixed reality tool for interactive virtual prototyping, Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, Vol: 30, Pages: 743-754, ISSN: 0956-5515

Designing new products according to user needs and requirements is a key success factor for companies. However, the characterization of user requirements in the early design stages is not an easy task due to the subjective nature of these requirements and because of the communication gap between users and designers. Digital design tools have the potential to enable users to actively participate in the design process and to directly interact with representations of the future product. Yet, they suffer a trade-off between their ability to accurately represent the user experience with the future product and their capacity to offer simple interfaces for the end user to manipulate. To overcome this issue, we introduce a new modular digital tool that allows users to become active participants of the design process through a high level of both immersion and control. The tool consists in a combination of a virtual reality environment for immersion and intuitive physical interfaces for direct control, resulting in a mixed reality hardware/software system. The hardware is made of modular tangible user interfaces (TUIs), custom-made by 3D printing and powered by a 3D game engine while the interactive content is displayed in virtual reality. The modularity of the system allows several TUIs and 3D content behaviours configurations to bring user friendliness and intuitively for each specific design project.

Journal article

Haritaipan L, Hayashi M, Mougenot CJM, 2018, Design of a massage-inspired haptic device for interpersonal connection in long-distance communication, Advances in Human-Computer Interaction, Vol: 2018, ISSN: 1687-5893

The use of tactile senses in mediated communication has generated considerable research interest in past decades. Since massage is a common practice in Asian cultures, we propose to introduce massage-based interactions in mediated communication between people in a close relationship. We designed a device for distant interactive massage to be used during online conversation and we assessed its effect on interpersonal connection with eight pairs of Chinese participants in romantic relationships. All pairs were asked to engage in a conversation, either through a video call or through a massage-assisted video call. The findings showed that the use of the massage device significantly increased the perceived emotional and physical connection between the users. The results also showed a significant increase in the engagement in the massage activity, e.g., total massage time and average force per finger, from positive conversation to negative conversation, demonstrating an evidence of the interplay between audio-visual and haptic communication. Post hoc interviews showed the potential of the massage device for long-distance communication in romantic relationships as well as in parents-children relationships.

Journal article

Haritaipan L, Saijo M, Mougenot CJM, 2018, Effect of Different Visual Modalities of Magic Precedents Representation on Design Creativity, 8th International Conference on Design Computing and Cognition

Conference paper

Zhang C, Lan B, Matsuura D, Mougenot C, Sugahara Y, Takeda Yet al., 2018, Kinematic design of a footplate drive mechanism using a 3-DOF parallel mechanism for walking rehabilitation device, JOURNAL OF ADVANCED MECHANICAL DESIGN SYSTEMS AND MANUFACTURING, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1881-3054

Journal article

Taoka Y, Kagohashi K, Saito S, Mougenot Cet al., 2018, Culturally-sensitive tools for design group ideation in a Japanese context

In engineering education at Japanese universities, design has recently been seen as a way of developing students’ mindset toward real life problem solving. In design project-based learning, students from various academic backgrounds team up in a “co-design” process. Co-design is common in Europe, especially in the Nordic countries where it originated, while it is rather unusual in Japan. Since designing consists in social activities like group discussion, cultural differences between Japan and the Nordic countries are expected to impact the way to map co-design into a Japanese context. Our objective is to create design education approaches that suit Japanese cultural context. Taking cultural differences into account, our main hypothesis is that anonymity might increase Japanese designers’ engagement, which would lead to higher creativity and more feedback in ideation activities. We developed new tools that provide anonymity during design activities and assessed them experimentally with sixteen Japanese students, in terms of perceived engagement of the designers and of the design outcomes. Findings show that anonymity leads to higher fluency and higher engagement in idea generation. Introduction of anonymity also increases critical discussion, while it remarkably decreased engagement of participants in idea selection. In this paper, we discuss how cultural characteristics should be taken into account when creating design tools and methods and, more generally, how design education should be tailored to specific cultural contexts.

Conference paper

Haritaipan L, Saijo M, Mougenot C, 2018, Leveraging creativity of design students with a magic-based inspiration tool

In this paper, we propose an unorthodox approach to enhancing creativity and user experience (UX) in product design with a “magic”-based tool. To support the introduction of magic in product interaction design, we created magic-based inspirational cards that show examples of magic effects. The tool was developed in two modalities, a “static” containing card that show illustrations of magic effects, and a “dynamic” containing the same cards plus videos of magic effects. The tools were experimentally tested with 30 novice designers who were asked to use the tools as a source of inspiration and to generate design ideas for a design task. The ideas generated by the participants were assessed in terms of creativity and intended UX. The findings show that the use of magic-based inspiration resulted in significantly more original but less feasible ideas, and that the use of videos led to design ideas that were significantly more “enjoyable” and more “exciting” than the use of cards only. Consequently, we propose guidelines on the use of magic-based inspiration tools for group ideation in order to help design students create original, enjoyable and exciting UX.

Conference paper

Mougenot C, Détienne F, Pennington M, Baker M, Corvin T, Antoine Veyrier C, Arai K, Huron Set al., 2017, Tensions in creativity workshops, Pages: 93-100

This research aims to go beyond classical brainstorming methods, with the classical divide between (irenic) idea generation and (eristic) selection, to explore creative means for shaping group creativity by intervening on the socio-affective dimension of group dynamics. In this paper, we develop the design rationale of a suite of four group creativity workshops (Time Trial, Idea Sports, Argument Clinic and Idea Gym), based on three approaches to introducing creative tensions, defined as pressure and disturbances in time management, in interpersonal relations and in use of artefacts in the workshops. We also report on a preliminary evaluation carried out with groups of students, into Masters-level training.

Conference paper

Detienne F, Baker M, Vanhille M, Mougenot Cet al., 2017, Cultures of collaboration in engineering design education: a contrastive case study in France and Japan, International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation, Vol: 5, Pages: 104-128, ISSN: 2165-0349

Engineering students need to learn to collaborate, to create and to innovate in culturally diverse socio-organisational contexts. However, research on intercultural differences provides results that are not specifically grounded in collaborative and creative engineering education practices. This paper presents a contrastive case study of engineering students’ appraisals of the quality of collaboration in collaborative design situations. Based on an extended multidimensional appraisal method (called ‘QC2’), we contrasted French and Japanese engineering students’ appraisals of: (1) ideal collaboration in design; (2) quality of collaboration with respect to actual cases of collaborative design in France and in Japan (as shown on videos). Results showed a common French–Japanese culture of collaboration across the engineering students with respect to aspects of design relating specifically to the domain of engineering, yet differences with respect to appraisals of dimensions of group work (task/group orientation and argumentation). These results, of a detailed situated case study, are compared with results of (mostly questionnaire-based) research on general cultural differences. We conclude with prospects for elaborating an operational trans-cultural concept of institutional culture of collaboration, and implications for training engineering students, especially for multicultural collaboration.

Journal article

Haritaipan L, Mougenot CJM, 2016, Cross-cultural Study of Tactile Interactions in Technologically Mediated Communication, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN: 0302-9743

Journal article

Arrighi P-A, Maurya S, Arai K, Moriya K, Mougenot Cet al., 2016, A Mixed Reality System for Kansei-Based Co-Design of Highly-Customized Products, JOURNAL OF INTEGRATED DESIGN & PROCESS SCIENCE, Vol: 20, Pages: 47-60, ISSN: 1092-0617

We designed a new Computer-Aided Design tool that can be easily and intuitively used by non-expert designers, like users of the products being designed. The target application is the design of highly-customized products together with the final users, more specifically the design of walking assistive devices with mobility-impaired people. The tool has simultaneously been developed with an ad-hoc protocol for an accurate evaluation of the satisfaction of users, through questionnaires and psychophysiological measurements. In fact, costly and complex technical products such as walking assistance devices require ad-hoc design processes to address the specific needs of each user. The characterization of user requirements in the early stage of design remains difficult due to their subjective and communication gap between the user and the designer. To overcome these issues, we propose a new modular digital toolbox that allows co-design between users and designers. The tool is a combination of a mixed reality hardware/software system and kansei (or affective) engineering techniques. The hardware consists of modular Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs), custom-made by 3D printing and powered by a 3D game engine. The interactive content is displayed in mixed reality, simultaneously to the user and the designer. Kansei data of the users are collected through questionnaires and psychophysical measurements, during multiple collaboration phases.

Journal article

Mougenot CJM, 2016, Japanese Higher Education in a Global Context: Making Students More Innovation-Minded, Journal of the Japan Society of Engineering Education

Journal article

Arrighi P-A, Maurya S, Mougenot CJM, 2016, Towards Co-designing with Users: A Mixed Reality Tool for Kansei Engineering, IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, ISSN: 1868-4238

Journal article

Haritaipan L, Mougenot C, 2016, Cross-cultural study of tactile interactions in technologically mediated communication, Pages: 63-69, ISSN: 0302-9743

In order to design tactile devices for technologically mediated communication, we investigated what tactile and gestural interactions would be spontaneously used for sharing emotions in mediated communication. In an experiment with 40 participants, we identified relations between hand gestures performed with a concept device and emotions that a “sender” intends to convey to a “receiver”. Among others, our results show that squeezing and shaking are the most popular chosen hand gesture interaction. Gesture intensity and speed follow the arousal (intensity) and temperature follows the valence (pleasure). Emotions that subjects are most are willing to share with such a tactile are gratitude, love, happy, sad, astonished, excited, angry and worried.

Conference paper

Arrighi P-A, Maurya S, Mougenot C, 2016, Towards Co-designing with Users: A Mixed Reality Tool for Kansei Engineering, 12th IFIP WG 5.1 International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management in the Era of Internet of Things (PLM), Publisher: SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, Pages: 751-760, ISSN: 1868-4238

Conference paper

LIU Y, MOUGENOT CEL, 2016, “EMO”: Design of an Emotional Communication Device based on Gestural Interactions, International Journal of Affective Engineering, Vol: 15, Pages: 135-142

Journal article

Dong Y, Mougenot C, 2014, EVALUATION OF THE EFFECT OF AN IDEATION SPACE ON DESIGN BRAINSTORMING SESSIONS, 13th International Design Conference, Publisher: DESIGN SOC, Pages: 473-480, ISSN: 1847-9073

Conference paper

Mougenot C, Watanabe K, 2013, Sensory stimulation of designers, Emotional Engineering, Pages: 63-71, ISBN: 9781447149835

This chapter examines the role of designers' own experience and perception in the process of designing new products, based on an experimental approach with designers. So far, most design studies have investigated the role of visual stimuli and visual modality in the design process. Designers being humans with senses, we claim that other sensory modalities might affect the design process and outcomes. We propose an approach to study the practice of designing where both creativity and designers' sensory impressions are investigated jointly.

Book chapter

Haring KS, Watanabe K, Mougenot C, 2013, The Influence of Robot Appearance on Assessment, 8th Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 131-+, ISSN: 2167-2121

Conference paper

Mougenot C, Watanabe K, 2012, Studying designers: Affective components of design creativity, Pages: 61-69

This paper examines the role of designers' own experience and perception in the process of designing new products, based on an experimental approach with designers. So far, most design studies have investigated the role of visual stimuli and visual modality in the design process. We claim that, designers being humans, other sensory modalities might affect the design process and the design outcomes. We propose an approach to study the practice of designing where both creativity and designers' sensory impressions are investigated jointly.

Conference paper

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