Imperial College London

Dr Craig Smalley

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Earth Science & Engineering

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

c.smalley

 
 
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Location

 

Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Smalley:1988:10.1016/0883-2927(88)90091-1,
author = {Smalley, PC and Råheim, A and Dickson, JAD and Emery, D},
doi = {10.1016/0883-2927(88)90091-1},
journal = {Applied Geochemistry},
pages = {591--600},
title = {<sup>87</sup>Sr/<sup>86</sup>Sr in waters from the Lincolnshire Limestone aquifer, England, and the potential of natural strontium isotopes as a tracer for a secondary recovery seawater injection process in oilfields},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0883-2927(88)90091-1},
volume = {3},
year = {1988}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - The Sr isotope composition of formation waters is a sensitive indicator of diagenetic processes in the host sediments, mixing processes between different bodies of water, and the connectivity of hydrological systems. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of present seawater is constant worldwife, while formation waters in hydrocarbon reservoirs have various values, depending on the aforementioned effects, in most cases different from modern seawater. This forms the basis of a natural tracer technique for seawater injection projects, involving characterization of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios and Sr contents of formation waters in the reservoir before injection commences, followed by monitoring of these parameters in the produced water as injection proceeds. This method is best suited to reservoirs in which the formation waters have low Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios much higher or lower than seawater. Available data for reservoir formation waters suggest that breakthrough recognition could be expected at <10% seawater in many sandstone reservoirs, while the method would be less sensitive in carbonate reservoir or situations where the formation waters had interacted with evaporites, as the associated waters tend to have high Sr contents. In heterogeneous but well-mapped reservoirs, it may be possible to obtain information about flow paths/mechanisms before breakthrough. Combination with other chemical and isotopic tracers creates a very powerful tool, the Sr method acting as a safeguard should the batch of water containing the conventional tracers be overtaken by subsequently injected seawater. The Sr method could also be used for injection projects that were begun without the addition of tracers. A natural analogue of a water injection process is found in the Jurassic Lincolnshire Limestone aquifer in England, where rapidly moving fresh meteoric water mixes progressively with an older saline formation water. The 87Sr/86Sr data enable quantitative modelling of this mixing process. T
AU - Smalley,PC
AU - Råheim,A
AU - Dickson,JAD
AU - Emery,D
DO - 10.1016/0883-2927(88)90091-1
EP - 600
PY - 1988///
SN - 0883-2927
SP - 591
TI - <sup>87</sup>Sr/<sup>86</sup>Sr in waters from the Lincolnshire Limestone aquifer, England, and the potential of natural strontium isotopes as a tracer for a secondary recovery seawater injection process in oilfields
T2 - Applied Geochemistry
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0883-2927(88)90091-1
VL - 3
ER -