Imperial College London

DrCraigBuchanan

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Lecturer in Construction
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8076craig.buchanan

 
 
//

Location

 

247Skempton BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

17 results found

Kyvelou P, Huang C, Gardner L, Buchanan Cet al., 2021, Structural testing and design of wire arc additively manufactured square hollow sections, Journal of Structural Engineering, Vol: 147, Pages: 1-19, ISSN: 0733-9445

Wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is a method of metal 3D printing that has the potential for significant impact on the construction industry due to its ability to produce large parts, with reasonable printing times and costs. There is currently however a lack of fundamental data on the performance of structural elements produced using this method of manufacture. Seeking to bridge this gap, the compressive behavior and resistance of WAAM square hollow sections (SHS) are investigated in this study. Testing reported in a previous study by the authors of sheet material produced in the same manner as the studied SHS is first summarized. The production, measurement and testing of a series of stainless steel SHS stub columns are then described. Regular cross-section profiles were chosen to isolate the influence of 3D printing and enable direct comparisons to be made against equivalent sections produced using traditional methods of manufacture. A range of cross-section sizes and thicknesses were considered to achieve variation in the local cross-sectional slenderness of the tested specimens, allowing the influence of local buckling to be assessed. Repeat tests enabled the variability in response between specimens to be evaluated; a total of 14 SHS stub columns of seven different local slendernesses was tested, covering all cross-section classes of AISC 370 and Eurocode 3. Advanced non-contact measurement techniques were employed to determine the as-built geometric properties, while digital image correlation measurements were used to provide detailed insight into the deformation characteristics of the test specimens. Owing to the higher geometric variability of WAAM relative to 2 conventional forming processes, the tested 3D printed stub columns were found to exhibit more variable capacities between repeat specimens than is generally displayed by stainlesssteel SHS. Comparisons of the stub column test results with existing structural design rules highlight the need to

Journal article

Zhang R, Buchanan C, Matilainen V-P, Daskalaki-Mountanou D, Britton T, Piili H, Salminen A, Gardner Let al., 2021, Mechanical properties and microstructure of additively manufactured stainless steel with laser welded joints, Materials and Design, Vol: 208, Pages: 1-20, ISSN: 0264-1275

Powder bed fusion (PBF) is a commonly employed metal additive manufacturing (AM) process in which components are built, layer-by-layer, using metallic powder. The component size is limited by the internal build volume of the employed PBF AM equipment; the fabrication of components larger than this volume therefore requires mechanical joining methods, such as laser welding. There are, however, very limited test data on the mechanical performance of PBF metal with laser welded joints. In this study, the mechanical properties of PBF built 316L stainless steel parts, joined together using laser welding to form larger components, have been investigated; the microstructure of the components has also been examined. 33 PBF 316L stainless steel tensile coupons, with central laser welds, welded using a range of welding parameters, and with coupon half parts built in two different orientations, were tested. The porosity, microhardness and microstructure of the welded coupons, along with the widths of the weld and heat-affected zone (HAZ), were characterised. The PBF base metal exhibited a typical cellular microstructure, while the weld consisted of equiaxed, columnar and cellular dendrite microstructures. Narrow weld regions and HAZs were observed. The PBF base metal was found to have higher proof and ultimate strengths, but a similar fracture strain and a lower Young’s modulus, compared with conventionally manufactured 316L stainless steel. The strengths were dependent on the build direction – the vertically built specimens showed lower proof strengths than the horizontal specimens. The laser welds generally exhibited lower microhardness, proof strengths and fracture strains than the PBF base metal which correlated with the observed structure. This work has demonstrated that PBF built parts can be joined by laser welding to form larger components and provided insight into the resulting strength and ductility.

Journal article

Kyvelou P, Slack H, Wadee MA, Buchanan C, Gardner Let al., 2021, Material testing and analysis of WAAM stainless steel, Sheffield, UK, Eurosteel 2020

Conference paper

Zhang R, Gardner L, Buchanan C, Matilainen VP, Piili H, Salminen Aet al., 2021, Testing and analysis of additively manufactured stainless steel CHS in compression, Thin Walled Structures, Vol: 159, ISSN: 0263-8231

Additive manufacturing, also referred to as 3D printing, has the potential to revolutionise the construction industry, offering opportunities for enhanced design freedom and reduced material use. There is currently, however, very limited data concerning the performance of additively manufactured metallic structural elements. To address this, an experimental and numerical investigation into the cross-sectional behaviour of circular hollow sections (CHS),produced by powder bed fusion (PBF) from Grade 316L stainless steel powder, is presented. The experimental programme comprised tensile coupon tests, initial geometric imperfection measurements and five axially loaded stub column tests on specimens with a range of diameter to-thickness (D/t) ratios. Similar cross-sectional behaviour to that of conventionally produced stainless steel CHS was observed, with the more slender cross-sections displaying increased susceptible to local buckling. In parallel with the experimental study, numerical simulations were carried out initially to replicate the experimental results and then to conduct parametric studies to extend the cross-sectional capacity data over a wider range of D/t ratios. The generated experimental and numerical results, together with other available test data on stainless steel CHS from the literature, were used to evaluate the applicability of existing design approaches for conventionally formed sections to those produced by additive manufacturing. Keywords: Additive manufacturing; Circular hollow sections; Current design approaches; Digital image correlation (DIC); Powder bed fusion (PBF); Stainless steel; Stub column testing; Tensile coupon tests; 3D printing.

Journal article

Gardner L, Kyvelou P, Herbert G, Buchanan Cet al., 2020, Testing and initial verification of the world's first metal 3D printed bridge, Journal of Constructional Steel Research, Vol: 172, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 0143-974X

Wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is a method of metal 3D printing that is suited to the requirements of the construction industry in terms of scale, speed and cost. Using this technology, a 10.5 m span footbridge, the first of its kind, has been printed. The testing, analysis and initial verification of the bridge and its components are described herein. The experiments performed included advanced geometric analysis, material testing, compressive testing of cross-sections and full-scale load testing of the bridge at various stages throughout and post construction. Parallel finite element modelling of the full bridge and its constituent elements has also been performed as part of the verification. Confirmation that the bridge was able to sustain its full serviceability design load enabled to the bridge to be unveiled to the public, with controlled access, for Dutch Design Week 2018. Further testing under ultimate limit state design loading is planned before the bridge is placed in its final location and fully opened to the public. The project highlights the potential for metal 3D printing in structural engineering, as well as the necessary considerations for design.

Journal article

Kyvelou P, Slack H, Daskalaki Mountanou D, Wadee MA, Britton T, Buchanan C, Gardner Let al., 2020, Mechanical and microstructural testing of wire and arc additivelymanufactured sheet material, Materials and Design, Vol: 192, ISSN: 0264-1275

Wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is a method of 3D printing that enables large elements to be built, with reasonable printing times and costs. There are, however, uncertainties relating to the structural performance of WAAM material, including the basic mechanical properties, the degree of anisotropy, the influence of the as-built geometry and the variability in response. Towards addressing this knowledge gap, a comprehensive series of tensile tests on WAAM stainless steel was conducted; the results are presented herein. As-built and machined coupons were tested to investigate the influence of the geometrical irregularity on the stress-strain characteristics, while material anisotropy was explored by testing coupons produced at different angles to the printing orientation. Non-contact measurement techniques were employed to determine the geometric properties and deformation fields of the specimens, while sophisticated analysis methods were used for post processing the test data. The material response revealed a significant degree of anisotropy, explained by the existence of a strong crystallographic texture, uncovered by means of electron backscatter diffraction. Finally, the effective mechanical properties of the as-built material were shown to be strongly dependent on the geometric variability; simple geometric measures were therefore developed to characterise the key aspects of the observed behaviour.

Journal article

Buchanan C, Zhao O, Real E, Gardner Let al., 2020, Cold-formed stainless steel CHS beam-columns – testing, simulation and design, Engineering Structures, Vol: 213, Pages: 1-23, ISSN: 0141-0296

The present work was prompted by shortcomings identi ed in existing design provisions for stainless steel circular hollow section (CHS) beam-columns. First, addressing a lack of existing experimental data, a series of ferritic stainless steel CHS beam-column tests was undertaken at the cross-section and member levels. In total, 26 beam-column tests, including two section sizes (a non-slender class 3 and slender class 4 cross-section), two member slenderness values for each cross-section type and a wide range of loading eccentricities were carried out to investigate the interaction between local and global buckling. Followingvalidation of nite element (FE) models, a numerical study was then undertaken to explore the buckling response of stainless steel CHS beam-columns, covering austenitic, duplex and ferritic grades with a wide range of local and global slendernesses and applied loading eccentricities. Over 2000 numerical results were generated and used to assess new designproposals for stainless steel beam-columns, featuring improved compression and bending end points and new interaction factors. The new proposals are more consistent and more accuratein their resistance predictions than the current EN 1993-1-4 (2015) design approach. The reliability of the new proposals has been veri ed by means of statistical analyses accordingto EN 1990 (2005).

Journal article

Buchanan C, Wan W, Gardner L, 2020, Testing of wire and arc additively manufactured stainless steel material and cross-sections

3D printing, or additive manufacturing (AM), is starting to be explored as a viable manufacturing technique in the construction industry. A 10 m span stainless steel pedestrian bridge is being built using Wire and Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) and, upon completion, will be placed in the centre of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Material tests and cross-section testing on circular hollow section (CHS) and square hollow section (SHS) columns have been undertaken to support this novel project. The unusual nature of the geometry and material properties has necessitated the use of advanced laser scanning and digital image correlation measurement techniques, along with Archimedes' measurements and silicone casting. The material response has been observed to be anisotropic, with a lower Young's modulus and material strength in certain orientations. The ultimate compressive capacities of the tested cross-sections have been observed to have a larger variation between repeat specimens than typically seen with conventionally produced elements, and the ultimate compressive capacities are generally overpredicted by current design methods.

Conference paper

Gardner L, Buchanan C, Wan W, 2020, Opportunities for metal 3D printing in structural engineering

3D printing, more formally known as additive manufacturing (AM), has the potential to revolutionise the construction industry, with anticipated benefits including greater structural efficiency, reduced material consumption and wastage, streamlining and expedition of the design-build process, enhanced customisation, greater architectural freedom and improved accuracy and safety on-site. Unlike traditional manufacturing methods for construction products, metal 3D printing offers ready opportunities to create non-prismatic sections, internal stiffening, openings, functionally graded elements, variable microstructures and mechanical properties through controlled heating and cooling and thermally-induced prestressing. It is envisaged that AM will complement, rather than replace, conventional production processes, with clear potential for hybrid solutions and structural strengthening and repairs. These opportunities are explored in this paper, along with early applications of metal additive manufacturing in the construction industry and other engineering disciplines.

Conference paper

Buchanan C, Gardner L, 2019, Metal 3D printing in construction: a review of methods, research, applications, opportunities and challenges, Engineering Structures, Vol: 180, Pages: 332-348, ISSN: 0141-0296

3D printing, more formally known as additive manufacturing (AM), has the potential to revolutionise the construction industry, with foreseeable benefits including greater structural efficiency, reduction in material consumption and wastage, streamlining and expedition of the design-build process, enhanced customisation, greater architectural freedom and improved accuracy and safety on-site. Unlike traditional manufacturing methods for construction products, metal 3D printing offers ready opportunities to create non-prismatic sections, internal stiffening, openings, functionally graded elements, variable microstructures and mechanical properties through controlled heating and cooling and thermally-induced prestressing. Additive manufacturing offers many opportunities for the construction sector, but there will also be fresh challenges and demands, such as the need for more digitally savvy engineers, greater use of advanced computational analysis and a new way of thinking for the design and verification of structures, with greater emphasis on inspection and load testing. It is envisaged that AM will complement, rather than replace, conventional production processes, with clear potential for hybrid solutions and structural strengthening and repairs. These opportunities and challenges are explored in this paper as part of a wider review of different methods of metal 3D printing, research and early applications of additive manufacturing in the construction industry. Lessons learnt for metal 3D printing in construction from additive manufacturing using other materials and in other industries are also presented.

Journal article

Buchanan C, Real E, Gardner L, 2018, Testing, simulation and design of cold-formed stainless steel CHS columns, Thin Walled Structures, Vol: 130, Pages: 297-312, ISSN: 0263-8231

Stainless steel tubular members are employed in a range of load-bearing applications due to their strength, durability and aesthetic appeal. From the limited existing test data on stainless steel circular hollow sections (CHS) columns it has been observed that the current Eurocode 3 provisions can be unconservative in their capacity predictions. A comprehensive experimental programme has therefore been undertaken to provide benchmark data to validate numerical models and underpin the development of revised buckling curves; in total 17 austenitic, 9 duplex and 11 ferritic stainless steel CHS column buckling tests and 10 stub column tests have been carried out. Five different cross-section sizes (covering class 1 to class 4 sections) and a wide range of member slendernesses have been examined. The experiments were initially replicated using finite element (FE) simulations; the validated FE models were then used to generate 450 additional column buckling data points. On the basis of the experimental and numerical results, new design recommendations have been made for cold-formed stainless steel CHS columns and statistically validated according to EN 1990.

Journal article

Buchanan C, Gardner L, Zhao O, Real Eet al., 2018, Design of stainless steel CHS beam-columns, Pages: 503-511

The EN 1993-1-4 (2015) design approach for stainless steel CHS beam-column members has been observed from prior experimental studies to provide capacity predictions that can be either overly conservative or unconservative depending upon the ratio of axial load to bending moment. Hence, a numerical parametric study has been undertaken to explore the buckling response of stainless steel CHS beam-columns, covering austenitic, duplex and ferritic grades with a wide range of local and global slendernesses and applied loading eccentricities. Over 2000 numerical results have been generated and used to assess new design proposals for stainless steel beam-columns, featuring improved compression and bending end points and new interaction factors. The new proposals are more consistent and, on average, 4% more accurate in their resistance predictions than the current EN 1993-1-4 (2015) design approach. The reliability of the existing and new proposals has been verified by means of statistical analyses according to EN 1990 (2005).

Conference paper

Buchanan C, Matilainen V-P, Salminen A, Gardner Let al., 2017, Structural performance of additive manufactured metallic material and cross-sections, Journal of Constructional Steel Research, Vol: 136, Pages: 35-48, ISSN: 0143-974X

Additive manufacturing, a common example of which is 3D printing, has become more prevalent in recent years with it now being possible to form metallic structural elements in this way. There are, however, limited available experimental data on the material behaviour of powder bed fusion (PBF) additive manufactured metallic structural elements and no existing data at the cross-section level; this is addressed in the present paper through a series of tests on additive manufactured stainless steel material and cross-sections. Tensile and compressive coupon tests were used to assess anisotropy, symmetry of stress-strain behaviour and the influence of building direction on the material properties. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths were seen to generally decrease in magnitude with increasing build angle, while a reduction in ductility was observed in some building orientations, and the Young's moduli were typically insensitive to the build angle. The structural behaviour of PBF additive manufactured cross-sections was investigated through a series of square hollow section (SHS) stub column tests, and the results compared with conventionally produced stainless steel SHS. The generated test results have been used to evaluate the applicability of existing design guidance for conventionally produced sections to additive manufactured sections.

Journal article

Buchanan C, Real E, Gardner L, 2016, Beam-column behaviour of ferritic stainless steel CHS members, 7th International Conference on Coupled Instabilities in Metal Structures. CIMS.

Conference paper

Buchanan C, Gardner L, Liew A, 2016, The continuous strength method for the design of circular hollow sections, Journal of Constructional Steel Research, Vol: 118, Pages: 207-216, ISSN: 0143-974X

Circular hollow sections (CHS) are widely used in a range of structural engineering applications. Their design is covered by all major design codes, which currently use elastic, perfectly-plastic material models and cross-section classification to determine cross-secti\on compressive and flexural resistances. Experimental data for stocky sections show that this can result in overly conservative estimates of cross-section capacity. The continuous strength method (CSM) has been developed to reflect better the observed behaviour of structural sections of different metallic materials. The method is deformation based and allows for the rational exploitation of strain hardening. In this paper, the CSM is extended to cover the design of non-slender and slender structural steel, stainless steel and aluminium CHS, underpinned by and validated against 342 stub column and bending test results. Comparisons with the test results show that, overall, the CSM on average offers more accurate and less scattered predictions of axial and flexural capacities than existing design methods.

Journal article

Buchanan C, Gardner L, Liew A, 2015, The continuous strength method for circular hollow sections, Pages: 621-628

Circular hollow sections (CHS) are widely used in a range of structural engineering applications. Their design is covered by all major design codes, which currently use elastic, perfectly-plastic material models and cross-section classification to predict cross-section compressive and flexural resistances. Experimental data for stocky sections show that this can result in overly conservative estimates of cross-section capacity. The continuous strength method (CSM) has been developed to reflect better the observed behaviour of metallic materials, with a continuous relationship between cross-section slenderness and deformation capacity, and a strain hardening material model. In this paper, the CSM is extended to cover the design of structural steel, stainless steel and aluminium CHS, underpinned by and validated against 519 stub column and bending test results. Comparisons with the test results show that the CSM offers more accurate and less scattered predictions of axial and flexural capacities than existing design methods.

Conference paper

Gardner L, Law A, Buchanan C, 2014, Unified slenderness limits for structural steel circular hollow sections, Romanian Journal of Technical Sciences, Applied Mechanics, Vol: 59, Pages: 153-163

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00563892&limit=30&person=true