Imperial College London

DrDavidAntcliffe

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Senior Lecturer in Critical Medicine
 
 
 
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d.antcliffe

 
 
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Intensive Care UnitCharing Cross HospitalCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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Year
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21 results found

Patel BV, Haar S, Handslip R, Auepanwiriyakul C, Lee TM-L, Patel S, Harston JA, Hosking-Jervis F, Kelly D, Sanderson B, Borgatta B, Tatham K, Welters I, Camporota L, Gordon AC, Komorowski M, Antcliffe D, Prowle JR, Puthucheary Z, Faisal AAet al., 2021, Natural history, trajectory, and management of mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients in the United Kingdom, Intensive Care Medicine, Vol: 47, Pages: 549-565, ISSN: 0342-4642

PurposeThe trajectory of mechanically ventilated patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is essential for clinical decisions, yet the focus so far has been on admission characteristics without consideration of the dynamic course of the disease in the context of applied therapeutic interventions.MethodsWe included adult patients undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) within 48 h of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with complete clinical data until ICU death or discharge. We examined the importance of factors associated with disease progression over the first week, implementation and responsiveness to interventions used in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and ICU outcome. We used machine learning (ML) and Explainable Artificial Intelligence (XAI) methods to characterise the evolution of clinical parameters and our ICU data visualisation tool is available as a web-based widget (https://www.CovidUK.ICU).ResultsData for 633 adults with COVID-19 who underwent IMV between 01 March 2020 and 31 August 2020 were analysed. Overall mortality was 43.3% and highest with non-resolution of hypoxaemia [60.4% vs17.6%; P < 0.001; median PaO2/FiO2 on the day of death was 12.3(8.9–18.4) kPa] and non-response to proning (69.5% vs.31.1%; P < 0.001). Two ML models using weeklong data demonstrated an increased predictive accuracy for mortality compared to admission data (74.5% and 76.3% vs 60%, respectively). XAI models highlighted the increasing importance, over the first week, of PaO2/FiO2 in predicting mortality. Prone positioning improved oxygenation only in 45% of patients. A higher peak pressure (OR 1.42[1.06–1.91]; P < 0.05), raised respiratory component (OR 1.71[ 1.17–2.5]; P < 0.01) and cardiovascular component (OR 1.36 [1.04–1.75]; P < 0.05) of the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score and raised lactate (OR 1.33 [0.99–1.79

Journal article

Patel BV, Haar S, Handslip R, Lee TM-L, Patel S, Harston JA, Hosking-Jervis F, Kelly D, Sanderson B, Bogatta B, Tatham K, Welters I, Camporota L, Gordon AC, Komorowski M, Antcliffe D, Prowle JR, Puthucheary Z, Faisal AAet al., 2020, Natural history, trajectory, and management of mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients in the United Kingdom, Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Background To date the description of mechanically ventilated patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has focussed on admission characteristics with no consideration of the dynamic course of the disease. Here, we present a data-driven analysis of granular, daily data from a representative proportion of patients undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) within the United Kingdom (UK) to evaluate the complete natural history of COVID-19.Methods We included adult patients undergoing IMV within 48 hours of ICU admission with complete clinical data until death or ICU discharge. We examined factors and trajectories that determined disease progression and responsiveness to ARDS interventions. Our data visualisation tool is available as a web-based widget (https://www.CovidUK.ICU).Findings Data for 623 adults with COVID-19 who were mechanically ventilated between 01 March 2020 and 31 August 2020 were analysed. Mortality, intensity of mechanical ventilation and severity of organ injury increased with severity of hypoxaemia. Median tidal volume per kg across all mandatory breaths was 5.6 [IQR 4.7-6.6] mL/kg based on reported body weight, but 7.0 [IQR 6.0-8.4] mL/kg based on calculated ideal body weight. Non-resolution of hypoxaemia over the first week of IMV was associated with higher ICU mortality (59.4% versus 16.3%; P<0.001). Of patients ventilated in prone position only 44% showed a positive oxygenation response. Non-responders to prone position show higher D-Dimers, troponin, cardiovascular SOFA, and higher ICU mortality (68.9% versus 29.7%; P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed prone non-responsiveness being independently associated with higher lactate (hazard ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.03–1.93), respiratory SOFA (hazard ratio 3.59, 95% CI 1.83–7.04); and cardiovascular SOFA score (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% CI 1.05–1.80).Interpretation A sizeable proportion of patients with progressive worsening of hypoxaemia were also refractory to evid

Working paper

Antcliffe DB, Gordon AC, 2019, Why Understanding Sepsis Endotypes Is Important for Steroid Trials in Septic Shock, Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 47, Pages: 1782-1784, ISSN: 0090-3493

Journal article

Antcliffe DB, Santhakumaran S, Orme RML, Ward JK, Al-Beidh F, ODea K, Perkins GD, Singer M, McAuley DF, Mason AJ, Cross M, Ashby D, Gordon ACet al., 2019, Levosimendan in septic shock in patients with biochemical evidence of cardiac dysfunction: a subgroup analysis of the LeoPARDS randomised trial, Intensive Care Medicine, Vol: 45, Pages: 1392-1400, ISSN: 0342-4642

PurposeMyocardial dysfunction is common in sepsis but optimal treatment strategies are unclear. The inodilator, levosimendan was suggested as a possible therapy; however, the levosimendan to prevent acute organ dysfunction in Sepsis (LeoPARDS) trial found it to have no benefit in reducing organ dysfunction in septic shock. In this study we evaluated the effects of levosimendan in patients with and without biochemical cardiac dysfunction and examined its non-inotropic effects.MethodsTwo cardiac biomarkers, troponin I (cTnI) and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and five inflammatory mediators were measured in plasma from patients recruited to the LeoPARDS trial at baseline and over the first 6 days. Mean total Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and 28-day mortality were compared between patients with normal and raised cTnI and NT-proBNP values, and between patients above and below median values.ResultsLevosimendan produced no benefit in SOFA score or 28-day mortality in patients with cardiac dysfunction. There was a statistically significant treatment by subgroup interaction (p = 0.04) in patients with NT-proBNP above or below the median value. Those with NT-proBNP values above the median receiving levosimendan had higher SOFA scores than those receiving placebo (mean daily total SOFA score 7.64 (4.41) vs 6.09 (3.88), mean difference 1.55, 95% CI 0.43–2.68). Levosimendan had no effect on the rate of decline of inflammatory biomarkers.ConclusionAdding levosimendan to standard care in septic shock was not associated with less severe organ dysfunction nor lower mortality in patients with biochemical evidence of cardiac dysfunction.

Journal article

Antcliffe D, Burnham K, Al-Beidh F, Santhakumaran S, Brett S, Hinds C, Ashby D, Knight J, Gordon ACet al., 2019, Transcriptomic signatures in sepsis and a differential response to steroids: from the VANISH randomized trial, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 199, Pages: 980-986, ISSN: 1073-449X

Rationale: There remains uncertainty about the role of corticosteroids in sepsis with clear beneficial effects on shock duration but conflicting survival effects. Two transcriptomic sepsis response signatures (SRS) have been identified. SRS1 is relatively immunosuppressed whilst SRS2 is relatively immunocompetent. Objectives: We aimed to categorized patients based on SRS endotypes to determine if these profiles influenced response to either norepinephrine or vasopressin, or to corticosteroids in septic shock. Methods: A post-hoc analysis was performed of a double-blind randomized clinical trial in septic shock (VANISH). Patients were included within 6 hours of onset of shock and were randomized to receive norepinephrine or vasopressin followed by hydrocortisone or placebo. Genome-wide gene expression profiling was performed and SRS endotype was determined using a previously established model using seven discriminant genes. Measurements and Main Results: Samples were available from 176 patients, 83 SRS1 and 93 SRS2. There was no significant interaction between SRS group and vasopressor assignment (p=0·50). However, there was an interaction between assignment to hydrocortisone or placebo, and SRS endotype (p=0·02). Hydrocortisone use was associated with increased mortality in those with an SRS2 phenotype (OR 7·9, 95%CI 1·6-39·9). Conclusions: Transcriptomic profile at onset of septic shock was associated with response to corticosteroids. Those with the immuno-competent SRS2 endotype had significantly higher mortality when given corticosteroids compared to placebo. Clinical trial registration available at www.isrctn.com, ID ISRCTN20769191.

Journal article

Antcliffe D, Al-Beidh F, Gordon A, 2018, Metabolic profiles in sepsis evolve over time, European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Congress, Publisher: SpringerOpen, ISSN: 2197-425X

Conference paper

Fiorini F, Antcliffe D, Al-Beidh F, Gordon Aet al., 2018, Analysis of lipoproteins in septic shock, European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Congress, Publisher: SpringerOpen, ISSN: 2197-425X

Conference paper

Antcliffe D, Ward J, Marshall T, Al-Beidh F, O'Dea K, Gordon Aet al., 2018, Multivariate analysis of cytokines in septic shock predicts outcome, European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Congress, Publisher: SpringerOpen, ISSN: 2197-425X

Conference paper

O'Callaghan D, Antcliffe D, 2018, Vasodilators and antihypertensives, Oh's Intensive Care Manual, Editors: Bersten, Handy, Publisher: Elsevier, ISBN: 9780702072215

This bestselling manual covers all aspects of intensive care in sufficient detail for daily practice while keeping you up to date with the latest innovations in the field.

Book chapter

Antcliffe D, Wolfer A, O'Dea K, Takata M, Holmes E, Gordon ACet al., 2018, Profiling inflammatory markers in patients with pneumonia on intensive care, Scientific Reports, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2045-2322

Clinical investigations lack predictive value when diagnosing pneumonia, especially when patients are ventilated and develop ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). New tools to aid diagnosis are important to improve outcomes. This pilot study examines the potential for a panel of inflammatory mediators to aid in the diagnosis. Forty-four ventilated patients, 17 with pneumonia and 27 with brain injuries, eight of whom developed VAP, were recruited. 51 inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and oxylipins, were measured in patients’ serum using flow cytometry and mass spectrometry. The mediators could separate patients admitted to ICU with pneumonia compared to brain injury with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) 0.75 (0.61–0.90). Changes in inflammatory mediators were similar in both groups over the course of ICU stay with 5,6-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic and 8,9-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids increasing over time and interleukin-6 decreasing. However, brain injured patients who developed VAP maintained inflammatory profiles similar to those at admission. A multivariate model containing 5,6-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid, 8,9-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8, could differentiate patients with VAP from brain injured patients without infection (AUROC 0.94 (0.80–1.00)). The use of a selected group of markers showed promise to aid the diagnosis of VAP especially when combined with clinical data.

Journal article

Antcliffe D, Fiorini F, Gordon A, 2018, Lessons from the ICU: choosing the right vasopressor, Hemodynamic Monitoring, Editors: Pinsky, Teboul, Vincent, Publisher: Springer, ISBN: 9783319692692

This book, part of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine textbook series, teaches readers how to use hemodynamic monitoring, an essential skill for today’s intensivists.

Book chapter

Antcliffe D, Jimenez B, Veselkov K, Holmes E, Gordon ACet al., 2017, Metabolic profiling in patients with pneumonia on intensive care, EBioMedicine, Vol: 18, Pages: 244-253, ISSN: 2352-3964

Clinical features and investigations lack predictive value when diagnosing pneumonia, especially when patients are ventilated and when patients develop ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). New tools to aid diagnosis are important to improve outcomes. This pilot study examines the potential for metabolic profiling to aid the diagnosis in critical care.In this prospective observational study ventilated patients with brain injuries or pneumonia were recruited in the intensive care unit and serum samples were collected soon after the start of ventilation. Metabolic profiles were produced using 1D 1H NMR spectra. Metabolic data were compared using multivariate statistical techniques including Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA).We recruited 15 patients with pneumonia and 26 with brain injuries, seven of whom went on to develop VAP. Comparison of metabolic profiles using OPLS-DA differentiated those with pneumonia from those with brain injuries (R2Y = 0.91, Q2Y = 0.28, p = 0.02) and those with VAP from those without (R2Y = 0.94, Q2Y = 0.27, p = 0.05). Metabolites that differentiated patients with pneumonia included lipid species, amino acids and glycoproteins.Metabolic profiling shows promise to aid in the diagnosis of pneumonia in ventilated patients and may allow a more timely diagnosis and better use of antibiotics.

Journal article

Antcliffe D, Gordon AC, 2016, Metabonomics and Intensive Care, Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2016, Editors: Vincent, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 353-364, ISBN: 978-3-319-27348-8

Book chapter

Gordon AC, Antcliffe D, 2016, Metabonomics and intensive care, Critical Care, Vol: 20, ISSN: 1364-8535

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency medicine 2016. Other selected articles can be found online at http://​www.​biomedcentral.​com/​collections/​annualupdate2016​. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://​www.​springer.​com/​series/​8901.

Journal article

Herrmann IK, Bertazzo S, O'Callaghan D, Schlegel AA, Kallepitis C, Antcliffe D, Gordon A, Stevens MMet al., 2015, Differentiating sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammation based on microvesicle-bacteria aggregation, Nanoscale, Vol: 7, Pages: 13511-13520, ISSN: 2040-3364

Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (≤1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions.

Journal article

Antcliffe DB, Veselkov K, Pearce JTM, Kinross J, Gordon ACet al., 2013, TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL VARIABLES TO IMPROVE DIAGNOSIS OF VENTILATOR ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA IN PATIENTS Wan BRAIN INJURY, ESICM 26th Annual Congress, Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S312-S313, ISSN: 0342-4642

Conference paper

Antcliffe D, Nanidis TG, Darzi AW, Tekkis PP, Papalois VEet al., 2009, A meta-analysis of mini-open versus standard open and laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy, TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 22, Pages: 463-474, ISSN: 0934-0874

Journal article

Nanidis TG, Antcliffe D, Kokkinos C, Borysiewicz CA, Darzi AW, Tekkis PP, Papalois VEet al., 2008, Laparoscopic versus open live donor nephrectomy in renal transplantation - A meta-analysis, ANNALS OF SURGERY, Vol: 247, Pages: 58-70, ISSN: 0003-4932

Journal article

Kokkinos C, Antcliffe D, Nanidis T, Darzi AW, Tekkis P, Papalois Vet al., 2007, Outcome of kidney transplantation from nonheart-beating versus heart-beating cadaveric donors, TRANSPLANTATION, Vol: 83, Pages: 1193-1199, ISSN: 0041-1337

Journal article

Kokkinos C, Nanidis T, Antcliffe D, Darzi AW, Tekkis P, Papalois Vet al., 2007, Comparison of laparoscopic versus hand-assisted live donor nephrectomy, TRANSPLANTATION, Vol: 83, Pages: 41-47, ISSN: 0041-1337

Journal article

Keelan J, Allen NJ, Antcliffe D, Pal S, Duchen MRet al., 2001, Quantitative imaging of glutathione in hippocampal neurons and glia in culture using monochlorobimane, JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH, Vol: 66, Pages: 873-884, ISSN: 0360-4012

Journal article

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