Imperial College London

Dr Doris SM Chan

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Research Fellow in Nutrition
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8590d.chan

 
 
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Location

 

Rm. 501Medical SchoolSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

17 results found

Chan DSM, Abar L, Cariolou M, Nanu N, Greenwood DC, Bandera EV, McTiernan A, Norat Tet al., 2019, World Cancer Research Fund International: Continuous Update Project-systematic literature review and meta-analysis of observational cohort studies on physical activity, sedentary behavior, adiposity, and weight change and breast cancer risk, CANCER CAUSES & CONTROL, Vol: 30, Pages: 1183-1200, ISSN: 0957-5243

Journal article

Chan DSM, Bandera EV, Greenwood DC, Norat Tet al., 2015, Circulating C-Reactive Protein and Breast Cancer Risk-Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol: 24, Pages: 1439-1449, ISSN: 1055-9965

We conducted a systematic literature review to explore the association between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP), a low-grade inflammation biomarker, and breast cancer risk. Relevant prospective studies in women were identified in PubMed and Web of Science until February 2015. Random-effects dose–response meta-analysis was conducted, overall and in postmenopausal women. Twelve out of 15 studies identified were included in the meta-analysis on any breast cancers (3,522 cases; 69,610 women) and nine on postmenopausal breast cancer (2,516 cases; 36,847 women). For each doubling of CRP concentration, a 7% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2%–12%] and 6% (95% CI, 1%–11%) increased risk was observed (I2 = 47% and 32%; Pheterogeneity = 0.04 and 0.17), respectively. The association was linear over most of the range of CRP concentrations. Positive associations remained in the studies that examined the exclusion of early years of follow-up. Associations were attenuated in studies adjusted for lifestyle factors, which partly explained the significant heterogeneity between studies in the overall analysis. On average, the associations in studies adjusted or not adjusted for body mass index were similar. Low-grade inflammation may have a role in breast cancer development. Additional prospective studies are needed to better understand confounding and effect modification from lifestyle factors.

Journal article

Chan DSM, Norat T, 2015, Obesity and Breast Cancer: Not Only a Risk Factor of the Disease, CURRENT TREATMENT OPTIONS IN ONCOLOGY, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1527-2729

Journal article

Chan DSM, Vieira AR, Aune D, Bandera EV, Greenwood DC, McTiernan A, Rosenblatt DN, Thune I, Vieira R, Norat Tet al., 2014, Body mass index and survival in women with breast cancer-systematic literature review and meta-analysis of 82 follow-up studies, ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 1901-1914, ISSN: 0923-7534

Journal article

Aune D, Chan DSM, Vieira AR, Rosenblatt DAN, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Cade JE, Burley VJ, Norat Tet al., 2012, Dietary fructose, carbohydrates, glycemic indices and pancreatic cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies, ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Vol: 23, Pages: 2536-2546, ISSN: 0923-7534

Journal article

Aune D, Vieira AR, Chan DSM, Rosenblatt DAN, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Cade JE, Burley VJ, Norat Tet al., 2012, Height and pancreatic cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies, CANCER CAUSES & CONTROL, Vol: 23, Pages: 1213-1222, ISSN: 0957-5243

Journal article

Aune D, Chan DSM, Vieira AR, Rosenblatt DAN, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Norat Tet al., 2012, Dietary compared with blood concentrations of carotenoids and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 96, Pages: 356-373, ISSN: 0002-9165

Journal article

Aune D, Chan DSM, Vieira AR, Rosenblatt DAN, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Norat Tet al., 2012, Fruits, vegetables and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies, BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, Vol: 134, Pages: 479-493, ISSN: 0167-6806

Journal article

Romaguera D, Vergnaud A-C, Peeters PH, van Gils CH, Chan DSM, Ferrari P, Romieu I, Jenab M, Slimani N, Clavel-Chapelon F, Fagherazzi G, Perquier F, Kaaks R, Teucher B, Boeing H, von Ruesten A, Tjonneland A, Olsen A, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Ramon Quiros J, Gonzalez CA, Jose Sanchez M, Navarro C, Barricarte A, Dorronsoro M, Khaw K-T, Wareham NJ, Crowe FL, Key TJ, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Bamia C, Masala G, Vineis P, Tumino R, Sieri S, Panico S, May AM, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Buechner FL, Wirfaelt E, Manjer J, Johansson I, Hallmans G, Skeie G, Benjaminsen Borch K, Parr CL, Riboli E, Norat Tet al., 2012, Is concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines for cancer prevention related to subsequent risk of cancer? Results from the EPIC study, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 96, Pages: 150-163, ISSN: 0002-9165

Journal article

Aune D, Chan DSM, Greenwood DC, Vieira AR, Rosenblatt DAN, Vieira R, Norat Tet al., 2012, Dietary fiber and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies, ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Vol: 23, Pages: 1394-1402, ISSN: 0923-7534

Journal article

Aune D, Greenwood DC, Chan DSM, Vieira R, Vieira AR, Rosenblatt DAN, Cade JE, Burley VJ, Norat Tet al., 2012, Body mass index, abdominal fatness and pancreatic cancer risk: a systematic review and non-linear dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies, ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Vol: 23, Pages: 843-852, ISSN: 0923-7534

Journal article

Aune D, Chan DSM, Lau R, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Kampman E, Norat Tet al., 2012, Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies, CANCER CAUSES & CONTROL, Vol: 23, Pages: 521-535, ISSN: 0957-5243

Journal article

Aune D, Lau R, Chan DSM, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Kampman E, Norat Tet al., 2012, Dairy products and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies, ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Vol: 23, Pages: 37-45, ISSN: 0923-7534

Journal article

Aune D, Chan DSM, Lau R, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Kampman E, Norat Tet al., 2011, Dietary fibre, whole grains, and risk of colorectal cancer: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 343, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Aune D, Lau R, Chan DSM, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Kampman E, Norat Tet al., 2011, Nonlinear Reduction in Risk for Colorectal Cancer by Fruit and Vegetable Intake Based on Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies, GASTROENTEROLOGY, Vol: 141, Pages: 106-118, ISSN: 0016-5085

Journal article

Chan DSM, Lau R, Aune D, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Kampman E, Norat Tet al., 2011, Red and processed meat and colorectal cancer incidence: meta-analysis of prospective studies, PLoS ONE, Vol: 6, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1932-6203

BackgroundThe evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from prospective studies and explore whether there is a non-linear association of red and processed meats with colorectal cancer risk.Methods and FindingsRelevant prospective studies were identified in PubMed until March 2011. For each study, relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random-effects model, weighting for the inverse of the variance, in highest versus lowest intake comparison, and dose-response meta-analyses. Red and processed meats intake was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. The summary relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for the highest versus the lowest intake was 1.22 (95% CI  = 1.11−1.34) and the RR for every 100 g/day increase was 1.14 (95% CI  = 1.04−1.24). Non-linear dose-response meta-analyses revealed that colorectal cancer risk increases approximately linearly with increasing intake of red and processed meats up to approximately 140 g/day, where the curve approaches its plateau. The associations were similar for colon and rectal cancer risk. When analyzed separately, colorectal cancer risk was related to intake of fresh red meat (RR for 100 g/day increase  = 1.17, 95% CI  = 1.05−1.31) and processed meat (RR for 50 g/day increase  = 1.18, 95% CI  = 1.10−1.28). Similar results were observed for colon cancer, but for rectal cancer, no significant associations were observed.ConclusionsHigh intake of red and processed meat is associated with significant increased risk of colorectal, colon and rectal cancers. The overall evidence of prospective studies supports limiting red and processed meat consumption as one of the dietary recommendations for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

Journal article

Touvier M, Chan DSM, Lau R, Aune D, Vieira R, Greenwood DC, Kampman E, Riboli E, Hercberg S, Norat Tet al., 2011, Meta-Analyses of Vitamin D Intake, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status, Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms, and Colorectal Cancer Risk, CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION, Vol: 20, Pages: 1003-1016, ISSN: 1055-9965

Journal article

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