Imperial College London

ProfessorDebbieJarvis

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Professor of Public Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7944d.jarvis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Hilary Barton +44 (0)20 7594 7942

 
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Location

 

28Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

343 results found

van der Plaat DA, Lenoir A, Dharmage S, Potts J, Gómez Real F, Shaheen SO, Jarvis D, Minelli C, Leynaert Bet al., 2024, Effects of testosterone and sex hormone binding globulinon lung function in males and females: a multivariable Mendelian Randomisation study, Thorax, ISSN: 0040-6376

BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggest that total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) may have beneficial effects on lung function, but these findings might be spurious due to confounding and reverse causation. We addressed these limitations by using multivariable Mendelian randomisation (MVMR) to investigate the independent causal effects of TT and SHBG on lung function. METHODS: We first identified genetic instruments by performing genome-wide association analyses of TT and SHBG in the large UK Biobank, separately in males and females. We then assessed the independent effects of TT and SHBG on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC using one-sample MVMR. We addressed pleiotropy, which could bias MVMR, using several methods that account for it. We performed subgroup MVMR analyses by obesity, physical activity and menopausal status, and assessed associations between TT and SHBG with lung function decline. Finally, we compared the MVMR results with those of observational analyses in the UK Biobank. FINDINGS: In the MVMR analyses, there was evidence of pleiotropy, but results were consistent when accounting for it. We found a strong beneficial effect of TT on FVC and FEV1 in both males and females, but a moderate detrimental effect of SHBG on FEV1 and FEV1/FVC in males only. Subgroup analyses suggested stronger effects of TT among obese and older males. The observational analyses, in line with previous studies, agreed with MRMV for TT, but not for SHBG. INTERPRETATION: These findings suggest that testosterone improves lung function in males and females, while SHBG has an opposite independent effect in males.

Journal article

Carsin A-E, Garcia-Aymerich J, Accordini S, Dharmage S, Leynaert B, de las Heras M, Casas L, Caviezel S, Demoly P, Forsberg B, Gislason T, Corsico AG, Janson C, Jogi R, Martinez-Moratalla J, Nowak D, Gomez LP, Pin I, Probst-Hensch N, Raherison-Semjen C, Squillacioti G, Svanes C, Toren K, Urrutia I, Huerta I, Anto JM, Jarvis D, Guerra Set al., 2023, Spirometric patterns in young and middle-aged adults: a 20-year European study, THORAX, ISSN: 0040-6376

Journal article

Lenoir A, Whittaker H, Gayle A, Jarvis D, Quint Jet al., 2023, Mortality in non-exacerbating COPD: a longitudinal analysis of UK primary care data, Thorax, Vol: 78, Pages: 904-911, ISSN: 0040-6376

Introduction: Non-exacerbating patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a less studied phenotype. We investigated clinical characteristics, mortality rates and causes of death among non-exacerbating compared with exacerbating patients with COPD.Methods: We used data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episode Statistics and Office for National Statistics between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2018. Ever smokers with a COPD diagnosis with minimum 3 years of baseline information were included. We compared overall using Cox regression and cause-specific mortality rates using competing risk analysis, adjusted for age, sex, deprivation, smoking status, body mass index, GOLD stage and comorbidities. Causes of death were identified using International Classification of Diseases-10 codes.Results: Among 67 516 patients, 17.3% did not exacerbate during the 3-year baseline period. Mean follow-up was 4 years. Non-exacerbators were more likely to be male (63.3% vs 52.4%, p<0.001) and less often had a history of asthma (33.9% vs 43.6%, p<0.001) or FEV1<50% predicted (23.7 vs 31.8%) compared with exacerbators. Adjusted HR for overall mortality in non-exacerbators compared with exacerbators was 0.62 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.70) in the first year of follow-up and 0.87 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.91) thereafter. Non-exacerbating patients with COPD died less of respiratory causes than exacerbators (29.2% vs 40.3%) and more of malignancies (29.4% vs 23.4%) and cardiovascular diseases (26.2% vs 22.9%). HRs for malignant and circulatory causes of death were increased after the first year of follow-up.Discussion: In this primary care cohort, non-exacerbators showed distinct clinical characteristics and lower mortality rates. Non-exacerbators were equally likely to die of respiratory, malignant or cardiovascular diseases.

Journal article

Macdougall A, Jarvis D, Keogh RH, Bowerman C, Bilton D, Davies G, Carrf SB, Stanojevic Set al., 2023, Trajectories of early growth and subsequent lung function in cystic fibrosis: An observational study using UK and Canadian registry data, JOURNAL OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS, Vol: 22, Pages: 388-394, ISSN: 1569-1993

Journal article

Mahmoud O, Granell R, Peralta GP, Garcia-Aymerich J, Jarvis D, Henderson J, Sterne Jet al., 2023, Early-life and health behaviour influences on lung function in early adulthood, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 61, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Grosso A, Cerveri I, Cazzoletti L, Zanolin ME, Mattioli V, Piloni D, Gini E, Albicini F, Ronzoni V, Jarvis D, Janson C, Corsico AGet al., 2023, Inhaled corticosteroids and risk of osteoporosis in late-middle-aged subjects: a multicenter European cohort study, MINERVA MEDICA, Vol: 114, Pages: 15-21, ISSN: 0026-4806

Journal article

De Matteis S, Jarvis D, Darnton L, Consonni D, Kromhout H, Hutchings S, Sadhra SS, Fishwick D, Vermeulen R, Rushton L, Cullinan Pet al., 2022, Lifetime occupational exposures and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk in the UK Biobank cohort, Thorax, Vol: 77, Pages: 997-1005, ISSN: 0040-6376

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Occupational exposures are important, preventable causes of COPD. We previously found an increased risk of COPD among six occupations by analysing lifetime job histories and lung function data in the population-based UK Biobank cohort. We aimed to build on these findings and elucidate the underlying potential causal agents to focus preventive strategies. METHODS: We applied the ALOHA+job exposure matrix (JEM) based on the International Standard Classification of Occupations V.1988 codes, where exposure to 12 selected agents was rated as 0 (no exposure), 1 (low) or 2 (high). COPD was spirometrically defined as FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal. We calculated semiquantitative cumulative exposure estimates for each agent by multiplying the duration of exposure and squared intensity. Prevalence ratio (PR) and 95% CI for COPD were estimated using robust Poisson regression adjusted for centre, sex, age, smoking and coexposure to JEM agents. Only associations confirmed among never-smokers and never-asthmatics were considered reliable. RESULTS: Out of 116 375 participants with complete job histories, 94 514 had acceptable/repeatable spirometry and smoking data and were included in the analysis. Pesticide exposure showed increased risk of COPD for ever exposure (PR=1.13, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.28) and high cumulative exposure (PR=1.32, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.56), with positive exposure-response trends (p trend=0.004), which were confirmed among never-smokers (p trend=0.005) and never-asthmatics (p trend=0.001). CONCLUSION: In a large population-based study, occupational exposure to pesticides was associated with risk of COPD. Focused preventive strategies for workers exposed to pesticides can prevent the associated COPD burden.

Journal article

Adamson A, Portas L, Accordini S, Marcon A, Jarvis D, Baio G, Minelli Cet al., 2022, Communication of personalised disease risk by general practitioners to motivate smoking cessation in England: a cost-effectiveness and research prioritisation study, ADDICTION, Vol: 117, Pages: 1438-1449, ISSN: 0965-2140

Journal article

Moitra S, Carsin A-E, Abramson M, Accordini S, Amaral A, Anto J, Bono R, Casas Ruiz L, Cerveri I, Chatzi L, Demoly P, Dorado-Arenas S, Forsberg B, Gilliland F, Gislason T, Gullon J, Heinrich J, Holm M, Janson C, Jogi R, Gomez Real F, Jarvis D, Leynaert B, Nowak D, Probst-Hensch N, Sanchez-Ramos J, Semjen C, Siroux V, Guerra S, Kogevinas M, Garcia-Aymerich Jet al., 2022, Long-term effect of asthma on the development of obesity among adults: an international cohort study, ECRHS, Thorax, ISSN: 0040-6376

Journal article

Weber P, Jarvis D, Baptista Menezes AM, Goncalves H, de Oliveira PD, Wehrmeister FCet al., 2022, Wheezing trajectories from childhood to adulthood in a population-based cohort, ALLERGOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 71, Pages: 200-206, ISSN: 1323-8930

Journal article

Allinson JP, Afzal S, Colak Y, Jarvis D, Backman H, van den Berge M, Boezen HM, Breyer M-K, Breyer-Kohansal R, Brusselle G, Burghuber OC, Faner R, Hartl S, Lahousse L, Langhammer A, Lundback B, Nwaru B, Ronmark E, Vikjord SAA, Vonk JM, Wijnant SRA, Lange P, Nordestgaard BG, Olvera N, Agusti A, Donaldson GC, Wedzicha JA, Vestbo J, Vanfleteren LEGWet al., 2022, Changes in lung function in European adults born between 1884 and 1996 and implications for the diagnosis of lung disease: a cross-sectional analysis of ten population-based studies, LANCET RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 10, Pages: 83-94, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Jeong A, Eze IC, Vienneau D, de Hoogh K, Keidel D, Rothe T, Burdet L, Holloway JW, Jarvis D, Kronenberg F, Lovison G, Imboden M, Probst-Hensch Net al., 2022, Residential greenness-related DNA methylation changes, ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 158, ISSN: 0160-4120

Journal article

Marcon A, Locatelli F, Dharmage SC, Svanes C, Heinrich J, Leynaert B, Burney P, Corsico A, Caliskan G, Calciano L, Gislason T, Janson C, Jarvis D, Jogi R, Lytras T, Malinovschi A, Probst-Hensch N, Toren K, Casas L, Verlato G, Garcia-Aymerich J, Accordini Set al., 2021, The coexistence of asthma and COPD: risk factors, clinical history and lung function trajectories, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 58, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Accordini S, Calciano L, Johannessen A, Benediktsdottir B, Bertelsen RJ, Braback L, Dharmage SC, Forsberg B, Real FG, Holloway JW, Holm M, Janson C, Jogi NO, Jogi R, Malinovschi A, Marcon A, Rovira JM-M, Sanchez-Ramos JL, Schlunssen V, Toren K, Jarvis D, Svanes Cet al., 2021, Prenatal and prepubertal exposures to tobacco smoke in men may cause lower lung function in future offspring: a three-generation study using a causal modelling approach, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 58, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Perret J, Vicendese D, Simons K, Lowe A, Lodge C, Jarvis D, Benke G, Bickerstaffe A, Mc Donald C, Abramson M, Walters EH, Minelli C, Dharmage Set al., 2021, Predictions of post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction by longitudinal asthma and wheeze patterns in middle-age, European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Kirkeleit J, Riise T, Jarvis D, Real FG, Janson C, Leynaert B, Svanes Cet al., 2021, Late Breaking Abstract - The SF-36 quality of life scales are sensitive measures of lung function decline, European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Fuertes E, Jarvis D, 2021, The complex interplay between greenness and air pollution in respiratory health, Thorax, Vol: 76, Pages: 856-857, ISSN: 0040-6376

Journal article

Archangelidi O, Sathiyajit S, Consonni D, Jarvis D, De Matteis Set al., 2021, Cleaning products and respiratory health outcomes in occupational cleaners: a systematic review and meta-analysis, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 78, Pages: 604-617, ISSN: 1351-0711

Journal article

Lam HCY, Jarvis D, 2021, Seasonal variation in total and pollen-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 51, Pages: 1085-1088, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Bui DS, Agusti A, Walters H, Lodge C, Perret JL, Lowe A, Bowatte G, Cassim R, Hamilton GS, Frith P, James A, Thomas PS, Jarvis D, Abramson MJ, Faner R, Dharmage SCet al., 2021, Lung function trajectory and biomarkers in the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study, ERJ OPEN RESEARCH, Vol: 7

Journal article

Jarvelin M-R, Wielscher M, Amaral AF, van der Plaat D, Wain LV, Sebert S, Mosen-Ansorena D, Auvinen J, Herzig K-H, Dehghan A, Jarvis DLet al., 2021, Genetic correlation and causal relationships between cardio-metabolic traits and lung function impairment, Genome Medicine, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1756-994X

AbstractBackground: Associations of low lung function with features of poor cardio-metabolic health have been reported.It is, however, unclear whether these co-morbidities reflect causal associations, shared genetic heritability or areconfounded by environmental factors.Methods: We performed three analyses: (1) cardio-metabolic health to lung function association tests in NorthernFinland Birth cohort 1966, (2) cross-trait linkage disequilibrium score regression (LDSC) to compare geneticbackgrounds and (3) Mendelian randomisation (MR) analysis to assess the causal effect of cardio-metabolic traitsand disease on lung function, and vice versa (bidirectional MR). Genetic associations were obtained from the UKBiobank data or published large-scale genome-wide association studies (N > 82,000).Results: We observed a negative genetic correlation between lung function and cardio-metabolic traits and diseases.In Mendelian Randomisation analysis (MR), we found associations between type 2 diabetes (T2D) instruments andforced vital capacity (FVC) as well as FEV1/FVC. Body mass index (BMI) instruments were associated to all lung functiontraits and C-reactive protein (CRP) instruments to FVC. These genetic associations provide evidence for a causal effectof cardio-metabolic traits on lung function. Multivariable MR suggested independence of these causal effects fromother tested cardio-metabolic traits and diseases. Analysis of lung function specific SNPs revealed a potential causaleffect of FEV1/FVC on blood pressure.Conclusions: The present study overcomes many limitations of observational studies by using MendelianRandomisation. We provide evidence for an independent causal effect of T2D, CRP and BMI on lung functionwith some of the T2D effect on lung function being attributed to inflammatory mechanisms. Furthermore,this analysis suggests a potential causal effect of FEV1/FVC on blood pressure. Our detailed analysis of theinterplay between cardio-metabolic traits and impaired

Journal article

Probst-Hensch N, Jeong A, Stolz D, Pons M, Soccal PM, Bettschart R, Jarvis D, Holloway JW, Kronenberg F, Imboden M, Schindler C, Lovison GFet al., 2021, Causal effects of body mass index on airflow obstruction and forced mid-expiratory flow: a mendelian randomization study taking interactions and age-specific instruments into consideration toward a life course perspective, Frontiers in Public Health, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 2296-2565

Obesity has complex links to respiratory health. Mendelian randomization (MR) enables assessment of causality of body mass index (BMI) effects on airflow obstruction and mid-expiratory flow. In the adult SAPALDIA cohort, recruiting 9,651 population-representative samples aged 18–60 years at baseline (female 51%), BMI and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) as well as forced mid-expiratory flow (FEF25–75%) were measured three times over 20 follow-up years. The causal effects of BMI in childhood and adulthood on FEV1/FVC and FEF25–75% were assessed in predictive (BMI averaged over 1st and 2nd, lung function (LF) averaged over 2nd and 3rd follow-up; N = 2,850) and long-term cross-sectional models (BMI and LF averaged over all follow-ups; N = 2,728) by Mendelian Randomization analyses with the use of weighted BMI allele score as an instrument variable and two-stage least squares (2SLS) method. Three different BMI allele scores were applied to specifically capture the part of BMI in adulthood that likely reflects tracking of genetically determined BMI in childhood. The main causal effects were derived from models containing BMI (instrumented by BMI genetic score), age, sex, height, and packyears smoked as covariates. BMI interactions were instrumented by the product of the instrument (BMI genetic score) and the relevant concomitant variable. Causal effects of BMI on FEV1/FVC and FEF25–75% were observed in both the predictive and long-term cross-sectional models. The causal BMI- LF effects were negative and attenuated with increasing age, and stronger if instrumented by gene scores associated with childhood BMI. This non-standard MR approach interrogating causal effects of multiplicative interaction suggests that the genetically rooted part of BMI patterns in childhood may be of particular relevance for the level of small airway function and airflow obstruction later in life. The methodological re

Journal article

Nerpin E, Ferreira DS, Weyler J, Schlunnsen V, Jogi R, Raherison Semjen C, Gislasson T, Demoly P, Heinrich J, Nowak D, Corsico A, Accordini S, Marcon A, Squillacioti G, Olivieri M, Nielsen R, Johannessen A, Gómez Real F, Garcia-Aymerich J, Urrutia I, Pereira-Vega A, Gullón JA, Olin A-C, Forsberg B, Emilsson ÖI, Pin I, Jarvis D, Janson C, Malinovschi Aet al., 2021, Bronchodilator response and lung function decline: Associations with exhaled nitric oxide with regard to sex and smoking status, The World Allergy Organization Journal, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1939-4551

Background: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a marker of type-2 inflammation used both to support diagnosis of asthma and follow up asthma patients. The associations of FeNO with lung function decline and bronchodilator (BD) response have been studied only scarcely in large populations. Objectives: To study the association between FeNO and a) retrospective lung function decline over 20 years, and b) lung function response to BD among asthmatic subjects compared with non-asthmatic subjects and with regards to current smoking and sex. Methods: Longitudinal analyses of previous lung function decline and FeNO level at follow-up and cross-sectional analyses of BD response and FeNO levels in 4257 participants (651 asthmatics) from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Results: Among asthmatic subjects, higher percentage declines of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC were associated with higher FeNO levels (p = 0.001 for both) at follow-up. These correlations were found mainly among non-smoking individuals (p = 0.001) and females (p = 0.001) in stratified analyses.Percentage increase in FEV1 after BD was positively associated with FeNO levels in non-asthmatic subjects. Further, after stratified for sex and smoking separately, a positive association was seen between FEV1 and FeNO levels in non-smokers and women, regardless of asthma status. Conclusions: We found a relationship between elevated FeNO and larger FEV1 decline over 20 years among subjects with asthma who were non-smokers or women. The association between elevated FeNO levels and larger BD response was found in both non-asthmatic and asthmatic subjects, mainly in women and non-smoking subjects.

Journal article

Tan DJ, Bui DS, Dai X, Lodge CJ, Lowe AJ, Thomas PS, Jarvis D, Abramson MJ, Walters EH, Perret JL, Dharmage SCet al., 2021, Does the use of inhaled corticosteroids in asthma benefit lung function in the long-term? A systematic review and meta-analysis, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY REVIEW, Vol: 30, ISSN: 0905-9180

Journal article

Russell MA, Dharmage S, Fuertes E, Marcon A, Carsin A-E, Pascual Erquicia S, Heinrich J, Johannessen A, Abramson MJ, Amaral A, Cerveri I, Demoly P, Garcia-Larsen V, Jarvis D, Martinez-Moratalla J, Nowak D, Palacios-Gomez L, Squillacioti G, Raza W, Emtner M, Garcia-Aymerich Jet al., 2021, The effect of physical activity on asthma incidence over 10 years: population-based study, ERJ Open Research, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2312-0541

Journal article

Bousquet J, Anto JM, Czarlewski W, Haahtela T, Fonseca SC, Iaccarino G, Blain H, Vidal A, Sheikh A, Akdis CA, Zuberbier T, ARIA groupet al., 2021, Cabbage and fermented vegetables: From death rate heterogeneity in countries to candidates for mitigation strategies of severe COVID-19, Allergy, Vol: 76, Pages: 735-750, ISSN: 0105-4538

Large differences in COVID-19 death rates exist between countries and between regions of the same country. Some very low death rate countries such as Eastern Asia, Central Europe, or the Balkans have a common feature of eating large quantities of fermented foods. Although biases exist when examining ecological studies, fermented vegetables or cabbage have been associated with low death rates in European countries. SARS-CoV-2 binds to its receptor, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). As a result of SARS-CoV-2 binding, ACE2 downregulation enhances the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 R) axis associated with oxidative stress. This leads to insulin resistance as well as lung and endothelial damage, two severe outcomes of COVID-19. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is the most potent antioxidant in humans and can block in particular the AT1 R axis. Cabbage contains precursors of sulforaphane, the most active natural activator of Nrf2. Fermented vegetables contain many lactobacilli, which are also potent Nrf2 activators. Three examples are: kimchi in Korea, westernized foods, and the slum paradox. It is proposed that fermented cabbage is a proof-of-concept of dietary manipulations that may enhance Nrf2-associated antioxidant effects, helpful in mitigating COVID-19 severity.

Journal article

Whittaker H, Bloom C, Morgan A, Jarvis D, Kiddle S, Quint Jet al., 2021, Accelerated FEV1 decline and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a primary care population of COPD patients, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 57, ISSN: 0903-1936

Accelerated lung function decline has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a general population, but little is known about this association in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated the association between accelerated lung function decline and CVD outcomes and mortality in a primary care COPD population.COPD patients without a history of CVD were identified in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD-GOLD) primary care dataset (n=36 282). Accelerated FEV1 decline was defined using the fastest quartile of the COPD population's decline. Cox regression assessed the association between baseline accelerated FEV1 decline and a composite CVD outcome over follow-up (myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, and CVD mortality). The model was adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, BMI, history of asthma, hypertension, diabetes, statin use, mMRC dyspnoea, exacerbation frequency, and baseline FEV1 percent predicted.6110 (16.8%) COPD patients had a CVD event during follow-up; median length of follow-up was 3.6 years [IQR 1.7–6.1]). Median rate of FEV1 decline was –19.4 mL·year−1 (IQR, –40.5 to 1.9); 9095 (25%) patients had accelerated FEV1 decline (>–40.5 mL·year−1), 27 287 (75%) did not (≤ –40.5 mL·year−1). Risk of CVD and mortality was similar between patients with and without accelerated FEV1 decline (HRadj 0.98 [95%CI, 0.90–1.06]). Corresponding risk estimates were 0.99 (95%CI 0.83–1.20) for heart failure, 0.89 (95%CI 0.70–1.12) for myocardial infarction, 1.01 (95%CI 0.82–1.23) for stroke, 0.97 (95%CI 0.81–1.15) for atrial fibrillation, 1.02 (95%CI 0.87–1.19) for coronary artery disease, and 0.94 (95%CI 0.71–1.25) for CVD mortality. Rather, risk of CVD was associated with mMRC score ≥2 and ≥2 exacerbations in the year prior.CVD out

Journal article

Lam H, Jarvis D, Fuertes E, 2021, Interactive effects of allergens and air pollution on respiratory health: A systematic review, Science of the Total Environment, Vol: 757, ISSN: 0048-9697

BackgroundStudies have demonstrated an adverse role of outdoor allergens on respiratory symptoms. It is unknown whether this effect is independent or synergistic of outdoor air pollutants.MethodsWe systematically reviewed all epidemiological studies that examined interaction effects between counts of outdoor airborne allergens (pollen, fungal spores) and air pollutants, on any respiratory health outcome in children and adults. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus databases. Each study was summarized qualitatively and assessed for quality and risk of bias (International Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews, registration number CRD42020162571).ResultsThirty-five studies were identified (15 timeseries, eight case-crossovers, 11 panels and one cohort study), of which 12 reported a significant statistical interaction between an allergen and air pollutant. Eight interactions were related to asthma outcomes, including one on lung function measures and wheeze, three to medical consultations for pollinosis and one to allergic symptoms (nasal, ocular or bronchial). There was no consensus as to which allergen or air pollutant is more likely to interact. No study investigated whether interactions are stronger in atopic individuals.ConclusionDespite strong evidence from small experimental studies in humans, only a third of studies identified significant allergen-pollutant interactions using common epidemiological study designs. Exposure misclassification, failure to examine subgroups at risk, inadequate statistical power or absence of population-level effects are possible explanations.

Journal article

Lytras T, Beckmeyer-Borowko A, Kogevinas M, Kromhout H, Carsin A-E, Anto JM, Bentouhami H, Weyler J, Heinrich J, Nowak D, Urrutia I, Martinez-Moratalla J, Gullon JA, Vega AP, Semjen CR, Pin I, Demoly P, Leynaert B, Villani S, Gislason T, Svanes O, Holm M, Forsberg B, Norback D, Mehta AJ, Keidel D, Vernez D, Benke G, Jogi R, Toren K, Sigsgaard T, Schlunssen V, Olivieri M, Blanc PD, Watkins J, Bono R, Squillacioti G, Buist AS, Vermeulen R, Jarvis D, Probst-Hensch N, Zock J-Pet al., 2021, Cumulative Occupational Exposures and Lung-Function Decline in Two Large General-Population Cohorts, ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY, Vol: 18, Pages: 238-246, ISSN: 1546-3222

Journal article

Harris CP, Fuertes E, Koletzko S, von Berg A, Berdel D, Schikowski T, Herberth G, Bauer C-P, Schulz H, Jarvis D, Standl Met al., 2021, MODIFICATION OF THE ASSOCIATION OF DIETARY PUFA WITH LUNG FUNCTION BY FADS GENE VARIANTS IN ADOLESCENTS: RESULTS FROM THE GINIPLUS AND LISA BIRTH COHORTS, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A51-A51, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

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