Imperial College London

ProfessorDannyO'Hare

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Bioengineering

Professor of Biosensor Technology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5173d.ohare

 
 
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Location

 

4.07Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

109 results found

Rawson TM, Wilson RC, O'Hare D, Herrero P, Kambugu A, Lamorde M, Ellington M, Georgiou P, Cass A, Hope WW, Holmes AHet al., 2021, Optimizing antimicrobial use: challenges, advances and opportunities, NATURE REVIEWS MICROBIOLOGY, ISSN: 1740-1526

Journal article

Brophy K, Davies S, Olenik S, Cotur Y, Ming D, Van Zalk N, O'Hare D, Guder F, Yetisen AKet al., 2021, The future of wearable technologies, Briefing Paper

Report

Zaman S, Seligman H, Lloyd FH, Patel KT, Chappell D, O'Hare D, Cole GD, Francis DP, Petraco R, Linton NWFet al., 2021, Aerosolised fluorescein can quantify FFP mask faceseal leakage: a cost-effective adaptation to the existing point of care fit test, CLINICAL MEDICINE, Vol: 21, Pages: E263-E268, ISSN: 1470-2118

Journal article

Gillespie P, Channon RB, Meng X, Islam MN, Ladame S, O'Hare Det al., 2021, Nucleic acid sensing via electrochemical oligonucleotide-templated reactions, BIOSENSORS & BIOELECTRONICS, Vol: 176, ISSN: 0956-5663

Journal article

Colburn AW, Levey KJ, O'Hare D, Macpherson JVet al., 2021, Lifting the lid on the potentiostat: a beginner's guide to understanding electrochemical circuitry and practical operation dagger, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS, Vol: 23, Pages: 8100-8117, ISSN: 1463-9076

Journal article

Morgan LD, Mohammed A, Patel BA, Arundell M, Jennert-Burtson K, Hernadi L, Overall A, Bowler LD, O'Hare D, Yeoman MSet al., 2020, Decreased 14-3-3 expression correlates with age-related regional reductions in CNS dopamine and motor function in the pond snail, Lymnaea, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, Vol: 53, Pages: 1394-1411, ISSN: 0953-816X

Journal article

Lee M-H, Liu K-T, Thomas JL, Su Z-L, O'Hare D, van Wuellen T, Chamarro JM, Bolognin S, Luo S-C, Schwamborn JC, Lin H-Yet al., 2020, Peptide-Imprinted Poly(hydroxymethyl 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Nanotubes for Detection of alpha Synuclein in Human Brain Organoids, ACS APPLIED NANO MATERIALS, Vol: 3, Pages: 8027-8036, ISSN: 2574-0970

Journal article

Raditya AN, O'Hare D, 2020, Review-Electrochemical Sensor Biofouling in Environmental Sensor Networks: Characterisation, Remediation and Lessons from Biomedical Devices, JOURNAL OF THE ELECTROCHEMICAL SOCIETY, Vol: 167, ISSN: 0013-4651

Journal article

Chen Y-C, O'Hare D, 2020, Exhaled breath condensate based breath analyser - a disposable hydrogen peroxide sensor and smart analyser, ANALYST, Vol: 145, Pages: 3549-3556, ISSN: 0003-2654

Journal article

Channon RB, Gillespie P, Nazmul Islam M, Meng X, Chen YC, O'Hare D, Ladame Set al., 2020, Electrochemical oligonucleotide templated reactions, Pages: 476-477

The biosensing of nucleic acids is an excellent approach for medical diagnosis, however established nucleic acid sensing technologies are typically limited by slow throughput, bulky equipment and the difficulty in achieving trace sensitivity with single nucleotide specificity. Here, we describe the first example of an electrochemical oligonucleotide templated reaction (EOTR). The target nucleic acid acts as a template for two probe-modified peptide nucleic acids. Reaction of the probe heads then generates an electrochemically active adduct. We couple EOTR with a lateral flow assay platform, towards developing a screening test for prostate cancer specific miRNA.

Conference paper

Cass AEG, O'Hare D, Sharma S, 2020, Recent Developments in Continuous Monitoring Diagnostics with Microneedle Arrays, 7th International Conference on the Development of Biomedical Engineering, Publisher: SPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD, Pages: 337-339, ISSN: 1680-0737

Conference paper

Rawson TM, Gowers SAN, Freeman DME, Wilson RC, Sharma S, Gilchrist M, MacGowan A, Lovering A, Bayliss M, Kyriakides M, Georgiou P, Cass AEG, O'Hare D, Holmes AHet al., 2019, Microneedle biosensors for real-time, minimally invasive drug monitoring of phenoxymethylpenicillin: a first-in-human evaluation in healthy volunteers, The Lancet Digital Health, Vol: 1, Pages: e335-e343, ISSN: 2589-7500

Background: Enhanced methods of drug monitoring are required to support the individualisation of antibiotic dosing. We report the first-in-human evaluation of real-time phenoxymethylpenicillin monitoring using a minimally invasive microneedle-based β-lactam biosensor in healthy volunteers.Methods: This first-in-human, proof-of-concept study was done at the National Institute of Health Research/Wellcome Trust Imperial Clinical Research Facility (Imperial College London, London, UK). The study was approved by London-Harrow Regional Ethics Committee. Volunteers were identified through emails sent to a healthy volunteer database from the Imperial College Clinical Research Facility. Volunteers, who had to be older than 18 years, were excluded if they had evidence of active infection, allergies to penicillin, were at high risk of skin infection, or presented with anaemia during screening. Participants wore a solid microneedle β-lactam biosensor for up to 6 h while being dosed at steady state with oral phenoxymethylpenicillin (five 500 mg doses every 6 h). On arrival at the study centre, two microneedle sensors were applied to the participant's forearm. Blood samples (via cannula, at −30, 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240 min) and extracellular fluid (ECF; via microdialysis, every 15 min) pharmacokinetic (PK) samples were taken during one dosing interval. Phenoxymethylpenicillin concentration data obtained from the microneedles were calibrated using locally estimated scatter plot smoothing and compared with free-blood and microdialysis (gold standard) data. Phenoxymethylpenicillin PK for each method was evaluated using non-compartmental analysis. Area under the concentration–time curve (AUC), maximum concentration, and time to maximum concentration were compared. Bias and limits of agreement were investigated with Bland–Altman plots. Microneedle biosensor limits of detection were estimated. The study was registered with Clinical

Journal article

Cass A, Sharma S, O'Hare D, 2019, Minimally invasive microneedle sensor arrays: New window on the body, ACS Fall National Meeting and Exposition, Publisher: AMER CHEMICAL SOC, ISSN: 0065-7727

Conference paper

Gowers SAN, Freeman DME, Rawson TM, Rogers ML, Wilson RC, Holmes AH, Cass AE, O'Hare Det al., 2019, Development of a minimally invasive microneedle-based sensor for continuous monitoring of β-lactam antibiotic concentrations in vivo, ACS sensors, Vol: 4, Pages: 1072-1080, ISSN: 2379-3694

Antimicrobial resistance poses a global threat to patient health. Improving the use and effectiveness of antimicrobials is critical in addressing this issue. This includes optimizing the dose of antibiotic delivered to each individual. New sensing approaches that track antimicrobial concentration for each patient in real time could allow individualized drug dosing. This work presents a potentiometric microneedle-based biosensor to detect levels of β-lactam antibiotics in vivo in a healthy human volunteer. The biosensor is coated with a pH-sensitive iridium oxide layer, which detects changes in local pH as a result of β-lactam hydrolysis by β-lactamase immobilized on the electrode surface. Development and optimization of the biosensor coatings are presented, giving a limit of detection of 6.8 μM in 10 mM PBS solution. Biosensors were found to be stable for up to 2 weeks at -20 °C and to withstand sterilization. Sensitivity was retained after application for 6 h in vivo. Proof-of-concept results are presented showing that penicillin concentrations measured using the microneedle-based biosensor track those measured using both discrete blood and microdialysis sampling in vivo. These preliminary results show the potential of this microneedle-based biosensor to provide a minimally invasive means to measure real-time β-lactam concentrations in vivo, representing an important first step toward a closed-loop therapeutic drug monitoring system.

Journal article

Wilson RE, Stoianov I, OHare D, 2019, Continuous chlorine detection in drinking water and a review of new detection methods, Johnson Matthey Technology Review, Vol: 63, Pages: 103-118, ISSN: 2056-5135

Chlorination is necessary to prevent epidemics of waterborne disease however excess chlorination is wasteful, produces harmful disinfection byproducts, exacerbates corrosion and causes deterioration in aesthetic qualities, leading to consumer complaints. Residual chlorine must be continuously monitored to prevent both under- and over-chlorination and factors including pH, temperature and fouling must be considered as these also affect the disinfectant strength of residual chlorine. Standard methods used by water utility companies to determine residual chlorine concentration in drinking water distribution systems are appraised and found to be unsuitable for continuous monitoring. A selection of newly developed methods for residual chlorine analysis are evaluated against performance criteria, to direct research towards the development of chlorine sensors that are suitable for use in water systems. It is found that fouling tolerance in particular is generally not well understood for these selected sensor technologies and that long-term trials in real systems is recommended.

Journal article

Gillespie P, Ladame S, O'Hare D, 2019, Molecular methods in electrochemical microRNA detection, ANALYST, Vol: 144, Pages: 114-129, ISSN: 0003-2654

Journal article

Channon RB, Pavagada S, Chang JYH, Kim SH, MacIntyre D, Bennett PR, Terzidou V, O'Hare D, Ladame Set al., 2019, Point-of-care nucleic Acid sensors via paper-based oligonucleotide-templated reactions, Pages: 815-816

This paper describes a new and inexpensive approach for specific sensing of endogenous concentrations of miRNAs extracted from blood, based on a fluorogenic oligonucleotide templated reaction (OTR) on a lateral flow assay (LFA). Our method is then applied to develop the first early screening test for Preterm birth.

Conference paper

Rawson T, Ming D, Gowers S, Freeman D, Herrero P, Georgiou P, Cass AEG, O'Hare D, Holmes Aet al., 2019, Public acceptability of computer-controlled antibiotic management: an exploration of automated dosing and opportunities for implementation, Journal of Infection, Vol: 78, Pages: 75-86, ISSN: 0163-4453

Journal article

Rawson TM, Gowers S, Rogers M, Sallabank E, Sharma S, Georgiou P, Holmes AH, Cass T, O'Hare Det al., 2018, Towards a minimally invasive device for continuous monitoring of beta-lactam antibiotics, Publisher: ELSEVIER SCI LTD, Pages: 109-109, ISSN: 1201-9712

Conference paper

Kim J-Y, O'Hare D, 2018, Monolithic nano-porous polymer in microfluidic channels for lab-chip liquid chromatography, Nano Convergence, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2196-5404

In this paper, a nano-porous polymer has been integrated into the microfluidics device as on-chip monolithic liquid chromatography column for separation of chemical and biological samples. Monolithic nano-porous polymer (MNP) was formed and firmly grafted on the surface of the microfluidic channel. Neurotransmitters, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT), were successfully separated with the developed on-chip MNP column.

Journal article

Zafeiropoulos G, O'Hare D, Drakakis E, 2018, PANACEA 2.0: A Wireless, High-Performance Multi-instrument for (Bio)Signals Recording, BioMedEng18

Conference paper

Rawson T, o'hare D, Herrero P, Sharma S, Moore L, de Barra E, Roberts J, Gordon A, Hope W, Georgiou P, Cass A, Holmes Aet al., 2018, Delivering precision antimicrobial therapy through closed-loop control systems, Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Vol: 73, Pages: 835-843, ISSN: 0305-7453

Sub-optimal exposure to antimicrobial therapy is associated with poor patient outcomes and the development of antimicrobial resistance. Mechanisms for optimizing the concentration of a drug within the individual patient are under development. However, several barriers remain in realizing true individualization of therapy. These include problems with plasma drug sampling, availability of appropriate assays, and current mechanisms for dose adjustment. Biosensor technology offers a means of providing real-time monitoring of antimicrobials in a minimally invasive fashion. We report the potential for using microneedle biosensor technology as part of closed-loop control systems for the optimization of antimicrobial therapy in individual patients.

Journal article

Bell CG, Seelanan P, O'Hare D, 2017, Microelectrode generator-collector systems for electrolytic titration: theoretical and practical considerations, ANALYST, Vol: 142, Pages: 4048-4057, ISSN: 0003-2654

Journal article

Rawson TM, Sharma S, Georgiou P, Holmes A, Cass A, O'Hare Det al., 2017, Towards a minimally invasive device for beta-lactam monitoring in humans, Electrochemistry Communications, Vol: 82, Pages: 1-5, ISSN: 1388-2481

Antimicrobial resistance is a leading patient safety issue. There is a need to develop novel mechanisms for monitoring and subsequently improving the precision of how we use antibiotics. A surface modified microneedle array was developed for monitoring beta-lactam antibiotic levels in human interstitial fluid. The sensor was fabricated by anodically electrodepositing iridium oxide (AEIROF) onto a platinum surface on the microneedle followed by fixation of beta-lactamase enzyme within a hydrogel. Calibration of the sensor was performed to penicillin-G in buffer solution (PBS) and artificial interstitial fluid (ISF). Further calibration of a platinum disc electrode was undertaken using amoxicillin and ceftriaxone. Open-circuit potentials were performed and data analysed using the Hill equation and log(concentration [M]) plots. The microneedle sensor demonstrated high reproducibility between penicillin-G runs in PBS with mean Km (± 1SD) = 0.0044 ± 0.0013 M and mean slope function of log(concentration plots) 29 ± 1.80 mV/decade (r2 = 0.933). Response was reproducible after 28 days storage at 4 °C. In artificial ISF, the sensors response was Km (± 1SD) = 0.0077 ± 0.0187 M and a slope function of 34 ± 1.85 mv/decade (r2 = 0.995). Our results suggest that microneedle array based beta-lactam sensing may be a future application of this AEIROF based enzymatic sensor.

Journal article

Zhexembekova A, Akhmetova N, Molkenova A, Bakenov Z, O'Hare Det al., 2017, Thiol-modified activated carbon material for sensor technology, 4th International Conference on Nanomaterials and Advanced Energy Storage Systems (INESS), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, Pages: 4599-4602, ISSN: 2214-7853

Conference paper

Gandhi SI, Boutelle M, O'Hare D, 2016, A novel electrolytic titrator design - Coating platinum cathodes with an electron sink using Nafion (R) and hexaammineruthenium (III), ELECTROCHEMISTRY COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 73, Pages: 50-54, ISSN: 1388-2481

Journal article

Wilson RE, Stoianov I, O'Hare D, 2016, Biofouling and in situ electrochemical cleaning of a boron-doped diamond free chlorine sensor, Electrochemistry Communications, Vol: 71, Pages: 79-83, ISSN: 1873-1902

Biofouling presents a significant obstacle to the long-term use of electrochemical sensors in complex media. Drinking water biofilms reduce performance of sensors by insulating electrode surfaces by inter alia inhibiting mass transport. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes are relatively resistant to biofouling and inert at high potentials. These qualities can be exploited to create a drinking water quality sensor that resists biofouling to meet performance criteria for longer, and to enable electrochemical cleaning of the sensor surface in situ using high potentials without disconnecting or disassembling the sensor.A purpose-built BDD wall-jet sensor was compared with a glassy carbon (GC) sensor in ability to determine free chlorine, detect biofilm and remove biofilm in situ. It was found that the BDD produced accurate and reliable readings with a 4.86% standard error and a LOD of 0.18 ppm. The BDD could be electrochemically cleaned in situ whereas this was less successful with the GC electrode. The BDD electrode could also detect electroactive pyocyanin, secreted in the biofilm of the drinking water biofilm indicator organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa, potentially enabling biofouling and non-biological fouling such as scaling to be distinguished. Observed changes in flow sensitivity and current-voltage curves that correspond to fouling provide multiple fouling detection methods, resulting in an accurate, sensitive, water quality sensor that can be cleaned without disassembly or replacement of parts and can identify when cleaning is required.

Journal article

Lee M-H, O'Hare D, Guo H-Z, Yang C-H, Lin H-Yet al., 2016, Electrochemical sensing of urinary progesterone with molecularly imprinted poly(aniline-co-metanilic acid)s, Journal of Materials Chemistry B, Vol: 4, Pages: 3782-3787, ISSN: 2050-7518

In this work, progesterone is imprinted into poly(aniline-co-metanilic acid) on the working electrode of an electrochemical sensing chip. This sensing chip was used directly to optimize the composition of the imprinting polymer. Poly(aniline-co-metanilic acid) deposited from a 1 : 3 molar ratio of aniline (ANI) : m-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (MSAN) had an imprinting effectiveness which led to a four-fold greater electrochemical response than pure polyaniline. The electrochemical sensing of progesterone had a limit of detection (LOD) less than 1.0 pg mL−1, and the direct electrochemical response was very weak even at high interference concentrations. Results from potential interferents (urea, testosterone, creatinine and 17-β estradiol) are reported. The progesterone levels that were measured in a random urine analysis were compared with those obtained using a commercial ARCHITECT system, and the accuracy of the progesterone concentration was 89.0 ± 5.3% at a concentration of 0.64–5.27 ng mL−1.

Journal article

Ng SR, Pang H, Chen P, Li CM, O'Hare Det al., 2015, A Novel Electroactive Polymer for pH-independent Oxygen Sensing, ELECTROANALYSIS, Vol: 27, Pages: 2745-2752, ISSN: 1040-0397

Journal article

Ng S, O'Hare D, 2015, An iridium oxide microelectrode for monitoring acute local pH changes of endothelial cells, The Analyst, Vol: 140, Pages: 4224-4231, ISSN: 0003-2654

pH sensors were fabricated by anodically electrodepositing iridium oxide films (AEIROFs) onto microelectrodes on chips and coated with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) for mechanical stability. These demonstrate super-Nernstian response to pH from pH 4.0 to 7.7 in chloride-free phosphate buffer. The surface of the chip was coated with fibronectin for the attachment of porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs). The working capability of the pH sensor for monitoring acute local pH changes was investigated by stimulating the PAECs with thrombin. Our results show that thrombin induced acute extracellular acidification of PAECs and dissolution of fibronectin, causing the local pH to decrease. The use of PD98059, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, reduced extracellular acidification and an increase in local pH was observed. This study shows that our pH sensors can facilitate the investigation of acute cellular responses to stimulation by monitoring the real-time, local pH changes of cells attached to the sensors.

Journal article

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