Imperial College London

DrDavidSalman

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Phase 1 Topic Leader - Lifestyle Medicine & Prevention
 
 
 
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Contact

 

d.salman11

 
 
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Location

 

Lab BlockCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

11 results found

Salman D, Beaney T, Robb C, Loots CADJ, Giannakopoulou P, Udeh-Momoh C, Ahmadi Abhari S, Majeed F, Middleton LT, McGregor AHet al., 2021, The impact of social restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic on the physical activity levels of adults aged 50-92 years: a baseline survey of the CHARIOT COVID-19 Rapid Response prospective cohort study, BMJ Open, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objectives: Physical inactivity is more common in older adults, is associated with social isolation and loneliness, and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. We examined the effect of social restrictions to reduce COVID-19 transmission in the UK (lockdown), on physical activity (PA) levels of older adults, and the social predictors of any change.Design: Baseline analysis of a survey-based prospective cohort study Setting: Adults enrolled in the Cognitive Health in Ageing Register for Investigational and Observational Trials (CHARIOT) cohort from General Practitioner (GP) practices in North West London were invited to participate from April to July 2020.Participants: 6,219 cognitively healthy adults aged 50 to 92 years completed the survey.Main outcome measures: Self-reported PA before and after the introduction of lockdown, as measured by Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) minutes. Associations of PA with demographic, lifestyle and social factors, mood and frailty.Results: Mean PA was significantly lower following the introduction of lockdown, from 3,519 MET minutes/week to 3,185 MET minutes/week (p<0.001). After adjustment for confounders and pre-lockdown PA, lower levels of PA after the introduction of lockdown were found in those who were over 85 years old (640 [95% CI: 246 to 1034] MET minutes/week less); were divorced or single (240 [95% CI: 120 to 360] MET minutes/week less); living alone (277 [95% CI: 152 to 402] MET minutes/week less); reported feeling lonely often (306 [95% CI: 60 to 552] MET minutes/week less); and showed symptoms of depression (1007 [95% CI: 1401 to 612] MET minutes/week less) compared to those aged 50-64 years, married, co-habiting, and not reporting loneliness or depression, respectively. Conclusions and Implications: Markers of social isolation, loneliness and depression were associated with lower PA following the introduction of lockdown in the UK. Targeted interventions to increase PA in these groups should be consid

Journal article

Salman D, Beaney T, Robb CE, de Jager Loots CA, Giannakopoulou P, Udeh-Momoh C, Ahmadi-Abhari S, Majeed A, Middleton LT, McGregor AHet al., 2021, The impact of social restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic on the physical activity levels of older adults: a baseline analysis of the CHARIOT COVID-19 Rapid Response prospective cohort study, Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Objectives</jats:title><jats:p>Physical inactivity is more common in older adults, is associated with social isolation and loneliness, and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. We examined the effect of social restrictions, implemented to reduce transmission of COVID-19 in the UK (lockdown), on physical activity (PA) levels of older adults, and the demographic, lifestyle and social predictors of this change.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Design</jats:title><jats:p>Baseline analysis of a survey-based prospective cohort study</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Setting</jats:title><jats:p>Adults enrolled in the Cognitive Health in Ageing Register for Investigational and Observational Trials (CHARIOT) cohort from GP practices in North West London were invited to participate from April to July 2020.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Participants</jats:title><jats:p>6,219 cognitively healthy adults aged 50 to 92 years completed the survey.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Main outcome measures</jats:title><jats:p>Self-reported PA before and after lockdown, as measured by Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) minutes. Associations of PA with demographic, lifestyle and social factors, mood and frailty.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Mean PA was significantly lower following lockdown, from 3,519 MET minutes/week to 3,185 MET minutes/week (p&lt;0.001). After adjustment for confounders and pre-lockdown PA, lower levels of PA after lockdown were found in those who were over 85 years old (640 [95% CI: 246 to 1034] MET minutes/week less); were divorced or single (240 [95% CI: 120 to 360] MET minutes/week less); living alone (277 [95

Working paper

Salman D, Vishnubala D, Le Feuvre P, Beaney T, Korgaonkar J, Majeed A, McGregor AHet al., 2021, Returning to physical activity after covid-19, BMJ: British Medical Journal, Vol: 372, Pages: 372-m4721, ISSN: 0959-535X

Journal article

Beaney T, Clarke JM, Jain V, Golestaneh AK, Lyons G, Salman D, Majeed Aet al., 2020, Excess mortality: the gold standard in measuring the impact of COVID-19 worldwide?, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Vol: 113, Pages: 329-334, ISSN: 0141-0768

Journal article

Beaney T, Salman D, Samee T, Mak Vet al., 2020, Assessment and management of adults with asthma during the covid-19 pandemic., BMJ, Vol: 369, Pages: 1-5, ISSN: 1759-2151

Journal article

Salman D, Farooqi M, McGregor A, Majeed Aet al., 2019, Time spent being sedentary: an emerging risk factor for poor health, British Journal of General Practice, Vol: 69, Pages: 278-279, ISSN: 0960-1643

Journal article

Poobalasingam T, Salman D, Li H, Costa JA, Dean CHet al., 2016, Imaging the lung: the old ways and the new, Histology and Histopathology, Vol: 32, Pages: 325-337, ISSN: 1699-5848

Our understanding of lung biology can be greatly enhanced by studying embryonic and postnatal lung development, and the perturbations which occur during disease. Imaging techniques provide a unique insight into these processes. A wide variety of imaging techniques have been used to study the lungs at various stages of development and disease, ranging from histological stains to more novel techniques such as single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), intravital microscopy (IVM), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Each of these tools can be used to elicit different information about the lungs and each has its own unique advantages and disadvantages for pulmonary research. In this review we assess some of the most commonly-used and novel imaging techniques available for lung research today.

Journal article

Salman D, Dean C, Griffiths MJD, 2016, Cyclic Strain of Precision Cut Lung Slices (PCLS) Induces Pro-Inflammatory and Pro-Proliferative Signalling, 60th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical-Society, Publisher: CELL PRESS, Pages: 96A-96A, ISSN: 0006-3495

Conference paper

Salman D, 2013, A molecular handshake: insulin–receptor interaction revealed, The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Vol: 1, Pages: s10-s10, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

Salman D, Finney SJ, Griffiths MJD, 2013, Strategies to reduce ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), BURNS, Vol: 39, Pages: 200-211, ISSN: 0305-4179

Journal article

Salman D, Cordingley JJ, Price S, Dusmet de Smours M, Finney SJ, Griffiths MJet al., 2011, Step down from extracorporeal memnra oxygenation (ECMO) to extra corporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in severe persisten acute repsriatory distress syndrome (ARDS), Am J Respir Crit Care Med, American Thoracic Society, Pages: A3884-A3884

Conference paper

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