Imperial College London

MrDuncanSpalding

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Senior Lecturer in Hepato-Biliary Surgery
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 3941d.spalding

 
 
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Location

 

Hammersmith HospitalHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

108 results found

Fehervari M, Das B, Soleimani-Nouri P, Ahmad M, Fadel MG, Deputy M, Morgan C, Burke JR, Mason JD, Nott D, Spalding Det al., 2022, Can surgical skills be taught using technological advances online? A comparative study of online and face-to-face surgical skills training, SURGICAL ENDOSCOPY AND OTHER INTERVENTIONAL TECHNIQUES, ISSN: 0930-2794

Journal article

Kilic Y, Graham A, Tait NP, Spalding D, Vlavianos P, Jiao LR, Alsafi Aet al., 2022, Percutaneous biliary stone clearance: is there still a need? A 10-year single-centre experience, CLINICAL RADIOLOGY, Vol: 77, Pages: 130-135, ISSN: 0009-9260

Journal article

Tabiri S, Kamarajah SK, Nepogodiev D, Li E, Simoes J, Sravanam S, Owusu SA, Mahama H, Agyeman YN, Arthur J, Kunfah SM, Gyamfi FE, Owusu EA, Loffler MW, Wandoh P, Bhangu A, Siaw-Acheampong K, Argus L, Chaudhry D, Dawson BE, Glasbey JC, Gujjuri RR, Jones CS, Khatri C, Keatley JM, Lawday S, Mann H, Marson EJ, Mclean KA, Picciochi M, Taylor EH, Tiwari A, Simoes JFF, Trout IM, Venn ML, Wilkin RJW, Dajti I, Gjata A, Boccalatte L, Modolo MM, Cox D, Pockney P, Townend P, Aigner F, Kronberger I, Hossain K, VanRamshorst G, Lawani I, Ataide G, Baiocchi G, Buarque I, Gohar M, Slavchev M, Agarwal A, Brar A, Martin J, Olivos M, Calvache J, Perez Rivera CJ, Hadzibegovic AD, Kopjar T, Mihanovic J, Klat J, Novysedlak R, Christensen P, El-Hussuna A, Batista S, Lincango E, Emile SH, Mengesha MG, Hailu DS, Tamiru H, Kauppila J, Arnaud A, Albertsmeiers M, Lederhuber H, Loffler M, Metallidis S, Tsoulfas G, Lorena MA, Grecinos G, Mersich T, Wettstein D, Ghosh D, Kembuan G, Brouk P, Khosravi M, Mozafari M, Adil A, Mohan HM, Zmora O, Fiore M, Gallo G, Pata F, Pellino G, Satoi S, Ayasra F, Chaar M, Fakhradiyev IR, Jamal M, Elhadi M, Gulla A, Roslani A, Martinez L, Ramos De la Medina A, Outani O, Jonker P, Kruijff S, Noltes M, Steinkamp P, van der Plas W, Ademuyiwa A, Osinaike B, Seyi-olajide J, Williams E, Pejkova S, Augestad KM, Soreide K, Al Balushi Z, Qureshi A, Sayyed R, Daraghmeh MAM, Abukhalaf S, Cukier M, Gomez H, Shu S, Vasquez X, Parreno-Sacdalan MD, Major P, Azevedo J, Cunha M, Santos I, Zarour A, Bonci E-A, Negoi I, Efetov S, Litvin A, Ntirenganya F, AlAmeer E, Radenkovic D, Xiang FKH, Hoe CM, Yong JNC, Moore R, Nhlabathi N, Colino RB, Bravo AM, Minaya-Bravo A, Jayarajah U, Wickramasinghe D, Elmujtaba M, Jebril W, Rutegard M, Sund M, Isik A, Leventoglu S, Abbott TEF, Benson R, Caruna E, Chakrabortee S, Demetriades A, Desai A, Drake TD, Edwards JG, Evans JP, Ford S, Fotopoulou C, Griffiths E, Hutchinson P, Jenkinson MD, Khan T, Knight S, Kolias A, Leung E, McKay S, Norman L, Ots Ret al., 2022, Impact of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination on postoperative mortality in patients with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection, BJS Open, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2474-9842

Journal article

McKay SC, Pathak S, Wilkin RJW, Kamarajah SK, Wigmore SJ, Rees J, Dunne DFJ, Garcea G, Ahmad J, Carino NDL, Sultana A, Silva M, Lykoudis P, Nasralla D, Milburn J, Shah N, Kocher HM, Bhogal R, Baron RD, Navarro A, Halle-Smith J, Al-Sarireh B, Sen G, Jamieson NB, Briggs C, Stell D, Aroori S, Bowles M, Kanwar A, Harper S, Menon K, Prachalias A, Srinivasan P, Frampton AE, Jones C, Arshad A, Tait I, Spalding D, Young AL, Durkin D, Ghods-Ghorbani M, Sutcliffe RP, Roberts KJet al., 2021, Impact of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on pancreatic cancer services and treatment pathways: United Kingdom experience, HPB, Vol: 23, Pages: 1656-1665, ISSN: 1365-182X

Journal article

Hashimoto A, Sarker D, Reebye V, Jarvis S, Sodergren MH, Kossenkov A, Sanseviero E, Raulf N, Vasara J, Andrikakou P, Meyer T, Huang K-W, Plummer R, Chee CE, Spalding D, Pai M, Khan S, Pinato DJ, Sharma R, Basu B, Palmer D, Ma Y-T, Evans J, Habib R, Martirosyan A, Elasri N, Reynaud A, Rossi JJ, Cobbold M, Habib NA, Gabrilovich DIet al., 2021, Upregulation of C/EBP alpha Inhibits Suppressive Activity of Myeloid Cells and Potentiates Antitumor Response in Mice and Patients with Cancer, CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH, Vol: 27, Pages: 5961-5978, ISSN: 1078-0432

Journal article

COVIDSurg Collaborative Co-authors, 2021, Machine learning risk prediction of mortality for patients undergoing surgery with perioperative SARS-CoV-2: the COVIDSurg mortality score, British Journal of Surgery, Vol: 108, Pages: 1274-1292, ISSN: 0007-1323

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic tens of millions of operations have been cancelled1 as a result of excessive postoperative pulmonary complications (51.2 per cent) and mortality rates (23.8 per cent) in patients with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection2. There is an urgent need to restart surgery safely in order to minimize the impact of untreated non-communicable disease.As rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection in elective surgery patients range from 1–9 per cent3–8, vaccination is expected to take years to implement globally9 and preoperative screening is likely to lead to increasing numbers of SARS-CoV-2-positive patients, perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection will remain a challenge for the foreseeable future.To inform consent and shared decision-making, a robust, globally applicable score is needed to predict individualized mortality risk for patients with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection. The authors aimed to develop and validate a machine learning-based risk score to predict postoperative mortality risk in patients with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Journal article

Pinato D, Cortellini A, Sukumaran A, Cole T, Pai M, Habib N, Spalding D, Sodergren M, Martinez M, Dhillon T, Tait P, Thomas R, Ward C, Kocher H, Yip V, Slater S, Sharma Ret al., 2021, PRIME-HCC: Phase Ib study of neoadjuvant ipilimumab and nivolumab prior to liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma, BMC Cancer, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1471-2407

BackgroundAfter liver resection (LR), patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC) are at high risk of recurrence. There are no approved anti-cancer therapies known to affect such risk, highlighting the acute need for novel systemic therapies to control the probability of disease relapse. Immunotherapy is expanding as a novel treatment option for HCC. Emerging data from cohort 4 of the CA209–040 study, which investigated the safety and preliminary efficacy of nivolumab/ipilimumab co-administration in advanced HCC, suggest that the combination can be delivered safely with an acceptable proportion of reversible grade 3–4 toxicities (27.1%) and a low discontinuation rate (2%) in patients with HCC. Here, we describe the design and rationale of PRIME-HCC, a two-part, multi-centre, phase Ib study to assess safety and bioactivity of the nivolumab/ipilimumab combination prior to LR in early-stage HCC.MethodsThe study involves an initial safety run-in phase (Part 1) to allow for preliminary safety characterisation within the first 6 patients enrolled and a subsequent expansion (Part 2). Ipilimumab will be administered once only on Day 1. Nivolumab will be administered on Day 1 and Day 22 (± 3 days) for a total of two 21-day cycles (i.e. 6 weeks of treatment). The primary objective of the study is to determine the safety and tolerability of the nivolumab/ipilimumab combination prior to LR. The secondary objective is to preliminarily characterize the efficacy of the combination prior to LR, including objective response rate (ORR) and pathologic response rates. Additional exploratory objectives include preliminary evidence of long-term disease control and to identify predictive correlates of response to the nivolumab/ipilimumab combination in HCC.DiscussionThe results of this study will help define the positioning of neoadjuvant nivolumab/ipilimumab combination in the perioperative management of HCC, with potential to improve survival outcom

Journal article

Glasbey JC, Omar O, Nepogodiev D, Minaya-Bravo A, Bankhead-Kendall BK, Fiore M, Futaba K, Gabre-Kidan A, Gujjuri RR, Isik A, Kaafarani HMA, Kamarajah SK, Li E, Loeffler MW, McLean KA, Outani O, Ntirenganya F, Satoi S, Shaw R, Simoes JFF, Stewart GD, Tabiri S, Trout IM, Bhangu AA, Glasbey JC, Omar O, Bhangu AA, Siaw-Acheampong K, Benson RA, Bywater E, Chaudhry D, Dawson BE, Evans JP, Glasbey JC, Gujjuri RR, Heritage E, Jones CS, Kamarajah SK, Khatri C, Khaw RA, Keatley JM, Knight A, Lawday S, Li E, Mann HS, Marson EJ, McLean KA, Mckay SC, Mills EC, Nepogodiev D, Pellino G, Picciochi M, Taylor EH, Tiwari A, Simoes JFF, Trout IM, Venn ML, Wilkin RJW, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, Smart NJ, Minaya-Bravo A, Evans JP, Gallo G, Moug S, Pata F, Pockney P, Di Saverio S, Vallance A, Vimalchandran D, Griffiths EA, Kamarajah SK, Evans RPT, Townend P, Roberts K, McKay S, Isaac J, Satoi S, Edwards J, Coonar AS, Marchbank A, Caruana EJ, Layton GR, Patel A, Brunelli A, Ford S, Desai A, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Almond M, Tirotta F, Dumitra S, Kolias A, Price SJ, Fountain DM, Jenkinson MD, Hutchinson P, Marcus HJ, Piper RJ, Lippa L, Servadei F, Esene I, Freyschlag C, Neville I, Rosseau G, Schaller K, Demetriades AK, Robertson F, Alamri A, Shaw R, Schache AG, Winter SC, Ho M, Nankivell P, Biel JR, Batstone M, Ganly I, Vidya R, Wilkins A, Singh JK, Thekinkattil D, Sundar S, Fotopoulou C, Leung E, Khan T, Chiva L, Sehouli J, Fagotti A, Cohen P, Gutelkin M, Ghebre R, Konney T, Pareja R, Bristow R, Dowdy S, Rajkumar STS, Ng J, Fujiwara K, Stewart GD, Lamb B, Narahari K, McNeill A, Colquhoun A, McGrath J, Bromage S, Barod R, Kasivisvanathan V, Klatte T, Simoes JFF, Abbott TEF, Abukhalaf S, Adamina M, Ademuyiwa AO, Agarwal A, Akkulak M, Alameer E, Alderson D, Alakaloko F, Albertsmeiers M, Alser O, Alshaar M, Alshryda S, Arnaud AP, Augestad KM, Ayasra F, Azevedo J, Bankhead-Kendall BK, Barlow E, Beard D, Benson RA, Blanco-Colino R, Brar A, Minaya-Bravo A, Breen KA, Bretherton C, Buarque IL, Burke J, Caruet al., 2021, Preoperative nasopharyngeal swab testing and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing elective surgery during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 108, Pages: 88-96, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Gavriilidis P, Sutcliffe RP, Roberts KJ, Pai M, Spalding D, Habib N, Jiao LR, Sodergren MHet al., 2020, No difference in mortality among ALPPS, two-staged hepatectomy, and portal vein embolization/ligation: A systematic review by updated traditional and network meta-analyses, HEPATOBILIARY & PANCREATIC DISEASES INTERNATIONAL, Vol: 19, Pages: 411-419, ISSN: 1499-3872

Journal article

Sarker D, Plummer R, Meyer T, Sodergren MH, Basu B, Chee CE, Huang K-W, Palmer DH, Ma YT, Evans TRJ, Spalding DRC, Pai M, Sharma R, Pinato DJ, Spicer J, Hunter S, Kwatra V, Nicholls JP, Collin D, Nutbrown R, Glenny H, Fairbairn S, Reebye V, Voutila J, Dorman S, Andrikakou P, Lloyd P, Felstead S, Vasara J, Habib R, Wood C, Saetrom P, Huber HE, Blakey DC, Rossi JJ, Habib Net al., 2020, MTL-CEBPA, a small activating RNA therapeutic upregulating C/EBP-α, in patients with advanced liver cancer: a first-in-human, multicenter, open-label, phase I trial, Clinical Cancer Research, Vol: 26, Pages: 3936-3946, ISSN: 1078-0432

PURPOSE: Transcription factor C/EBP-α (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha) acts as a master regulator of hepatic and myeloid functions and multiple oncogenic processes. MTL-CEBPA is a first-in-class small activating RNA oligonucleotide drug that upregulates C/EBP-α. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a phase I, open-label, dose-escalation trial of MTL-CEBPA in adults with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with cirrhosis, or resulting from nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or with liver metastases. Patients received intravenous MTL-CEBPA once a week for 3 weeks followed by a rest period of 1 week per treatment cycle in the dose-escalation phase (3+3 design). RESULTS: Thirty-eight participants have been treated across six dose levels (28-160 mg/m2) and three dosing schedules. Thirty-four patients were evaluable for safety endpoints at 28 days. MTL-CEBPA treatment-related adverse events were not associated with dose, and no maximum dose was reached across the three schedules evaluated. Grade 3 treatment-related adverse events occurred in nine (24%) patients. In 24 patients with HCC evaluable for efficacy, an objective tumor response was achieved in one patient [4%; partial response (PR) for over 2 years] and stable disease (SD) in 12 (50%). After discontinuation of MTL-CEBPA, seven patients were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); three patients had a complete response with one further PR and two with SD. CONCLUSIONS: MTL-CEBPA is the first saRNA in clinical trials and demonstrates an acceptable safety profile and potential synergistic efficacy with TKIs in HCC. These encouraging phase I data validate targeting of C/EBP-α and have prompted MTL-CEBPA + sorafenib combination studies in HCC.

Journal article

Noor MS, Dennis J, Al-Hinai K, Arhi C, Spalding Det al., 2020, Quality Improvement Project: Improving the External Referrals Service of the Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary (HPB) Surgery in a Tertiary Centre, International Surgical Conference of the Association-of-Surgeons-in-Training, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 187-187, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Sarker D, Sodergren M, Plummer ER, Basu B, Meyer T, Huang K-W, Evans TRJ, Spalding D, Ma YT, Palmer DH, Chee CE, Pinato DJ, Reebye V, McVeigh D, Raulf N, Vasara J, Andrikakou P, Habib R, Blakey D, Habib NAet al., 2020, Phase Ib dose escalation and cohort expansion study of the novel myeloid differentiating agent MTL-CEBPA in combination with sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)., Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Clinical-Oncology (ASCO), Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0732-183X

Conference paper

da Costa AC, Sodergren M, Jayant K, Santa Cruz F, Spalding D, Pai M, Habib Net al., 2020, Radiofrequency combined with immunomodulation for hepatocellular carcinoma: State of the art and innovations, WORLD JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, Vol: 26, Pages: 2040-2048, ISSN: 1007-9327

Journal article

Sarker D, Sodergren M, Plummer ER, Basu B, Meyer T, Huang K-W, Evans TRJ, Spalding D, Ma YT, Palmer DH, Chee CE, Pinato DJ, Reebye V, McVeigh D, Raulf N, Vasara J, Andrikakou P, Habib R, Blakey D, Habib NAet al., 2020, First-in-human phase I trial of small activating RNA (saRNA) oligonucleotide MTL-CEBPA in combination with sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium of the American-Society-of-Clinical-Oncology, Publisher: AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, ISSN: 0732-183X

Conference paper

Sarker D, Plummer R, Basu B, Meyer T, Ma Y-T, Evans J, Palmer DH, Huang K-W, Chee E, Spalding D, Sodergren M, Habib Net al., 2019, First-in-human, first-in-class phase I study of MTL-CEBPA, a RNA oligonucleotide targeting the myeloid cell master regulator C/EBP-alpha, in patients with advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC), 44th Congress of the European-Society-for-Medical-Oncology (ESMO), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: 168-+, ISSN: 0923-7534

Conference paper

Dindyal S, Wing V, Adebayo D, Pai M, Spalding Det al., 2019, Elective and emergency splenectomise at a tertiary referral teaching hospital - an audit of current practice, International Surgical Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland (ASGBI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 94-94, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Dindyal S, Siddique H, Pai M, Spalding Det al., 2019, Can a virtual clinic reduce waiting times and improve patient satisfaction in a tertiary referral teaching hospital, International Surgical Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland (ASGBI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 77-77, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Patel BY, White L, Howard AM, Tait P, Thomas R, Habib N, Pai M, Spalding D, Gall T, Jiao Let al., 2019, A Retrospective Analysis of Portal Vein Embolisation In A Tertiary Hepato Pancreato Biliary Centre, International Surgical Conference of the Association-of-Surgeons-in-Training (ASIT), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 74-74, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Poovathoor AJ, Belete S, Afoke J, Spalding D, Punjabi Pet al., 2019, Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and major hepatobiliary surgery: An effective way to judge fitness for surgery?, International Surgical Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland (ASGBI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 68-69, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Dindyal S, Ross T, Adebayor D, Pai M, Spalding Det al., 2019, To what extent can a closed loop audit initiative successfully influence clinical care and improve safety of handover in a tertiary referral teaching hospital, International Surgical Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland (ASGBI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 94-94, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Wadsworth CA, Dixon PH, Taylor-Robinso SD, Kim JU, Zabron AA, Wong JH, Chapman MH, McKay SC, Spalding DR, Wasan HS, Pereira SP, Thomas HC, Whittaker JC, Williamson C, Khan SAet al., 2019, Polymorphisms in natural killer cell receptor protein 2D (NKG2D) as a risk factor for Cholangiocarcinoma, Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology, Vol: 9, Pages: 171-175, ISSN: 0973-6883

Background and aims: Understanding of the significant genetic risk factors for Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) remains limited. Polymorphisms in the natural killer cell receptor G2D (NKG2D) gene have been shown to increase risk of CC transformation in patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC). We present a validation study of NKG2D polymorphisms in CC patients without PSC. Methods: Seven common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NKG2D gene were genotyped in 164 non-PSC related CC subjects and 257 controls with HaploView. The two SNPs that were positively identified in the previous Scandinavian study, rs11053781 and rs2617167, were included. Results: The seven genotyped SNPs were not associated with risk of CC. Furthermore, haplotype analysis revealed that there was no evidence to suggest that any haplotype differs in frequency between cases and controls (P > 0.1). Conclusion: The common genetic variation in NKG2D does not correlate significantly with sporadic CC risk. This is in contrast to the previous positive findings in the Scandinavian study with PSC-patients. The failure to reproduce the association may reflect an important difference between the pathogenesis of sporadic CC and that of PSC-related CC. Given that genetic susceptibility is likely to be multifaceted and complex, further validation studies that include both sporadic and PSC-related CC are required.

Journal article

Gall TMH, Gerrard G, Frampton AE, Castellano L, Ahmad R, Habib N, Spalding D, Pai M, Foroni L, Jiao LRet al., 2019, Can we predict long-term survival in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma?, Oncotarget, Vol: 10, Pages: 696-706, ISSN: 1949-2553

Objective: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive tumour associated with poor 5-year survival. We aimed to determine factors which differentiate short and long-term survivors and identify a prognostic biomarker. Methods: Over a ten-year period, patients with resected PDAC who developed disease recurrence within 12 months (Group I) and those who had no disease recurrence for 24 months (Group II) were identified. Clinicopathological data was analysed. Ion Torrent high-throughput sequencing on DNA extracted from FFPE tumour samples was used to identify mutations. Additionally, peripheral blood samples were analysed for variants in cell-free DNA, circulating tumour cells (CTCs), and microRNAs. Results: Multivariable analysis of clinicopathological factors showed that a positive medial resection margin was significantly associated with short disease-free survival (p = 0.007). Group I patients (n = 21) had a higher frequency of the KRAS mutant mean variant allele (16.93% ± 11.04) compared to those in Group II (n = 13; 7.55% ± 5.76, p = 0.0078). Group I patients also trended towards having a KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutation in addition to variants in other genes, such as TP53, CDKN2A, and SMAD4. Mutational status of cell-free DNA, and number of CTCs, was not found to be useful in this study. A circulating miRNA (hsa-miR-548ah-5p) was found to be significantly differentially expressed. Conclusions: Medial resection margin status and the frequency of KRAS mutation in the tumour tissue are independent prognostic indicators for resectable PDAC. Circulating miRNA hsa-miR-548ah-5p has the potential to be used as a prognostic biomarker.

Journal article

Jayant K, Sodergren MH, Reccia I, Kusano T, Zacharoulis D, Spalding D, Pai M, Jiao LR, Huang KWet al., 2018, A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing liver resection with the rf-based device habib (TM)-4x with the clamp-crush technique, Cancers, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 2072-6694

Liver cancer is the sixth most common cancer and third most common cause of cancer-related mortality. Presently, indications for liver resections for liver cancers are widening, but the response is varied owing to the multitude of factors including excess intraoperative bleeding, increased blood transfusion requirement, post-hepatectomy liver failure and morbidity. The advent of the radiofrequency energy-based bipolar device Habib™-4X has made bloodless hepatic resection possible. The radiofrequency-generated coagulative necrosis on normal liver parenchyma provides a firm underpinning for the bloodless liver resection. This meta-analysis was undertaken to analyse the available data on the clinical effectiveness or outcomes of liver resection with Habib™-4X in comparison to the clamp-crush technique. The RF-assisted device Habib™-4X is considered a safe and feasible modality for liver resection compared to the clamp-crush technique owing to the multitude of benefits and mounting clinical evidence supporting its role as a superior liver resection device. The most intriguing advantage of the RF-device is its ability to induce systemic and local immunomodulatory changes that further expand the boundaries of survival outcomes following liver resection.

Journal article

Markar SR, Brodie B, Chin S-T, Romano A, Spalding D, Hanna GBet al., 2018, Profile of exhaled-breath volatile organic compounds to diagnose pancreatic cancer, British Journal of Surgery, Vol: 105, Pages: 1493-1500, ISSN: 1365-2168

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer has a very poor prognosis as most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage when curative treatments are not possible. Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have shown potential as novel biomarkers to detect cancer. The aim of the study was to quantify differences in exhaled breath VOCs of patients with pancreatic cancers compared with cohorts without cancer. METHODS: Patients were recruited to an initial development cohort and a second validation cohort. The cancer group included patients with localized and metastatic cancers, whereas the control group included patients with benign pancreatic disease or normal pancreas. The reference test for comparison was radiological imaging using abdominal CT, ultrasound imaging or endoscopic ultrasonography, confirmed by histopathological examination as appropriate. Breath was collected from the development cohort with steel bags, and from the validation cohort using the ReCIVA™ system. Analysis was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: A total of 68 patients were recruited to the development cohort (25 with cancer, 43 no cancer) and 64 to the validation cohort (32 with cancer, 32 no cancer). Of 66 VOCs identified, 12 were significantly different between groups in the development cohort on univariable analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using significant volatile compounds and the validation cohort produced an area under the curve of 0·736 (sensitivity 81 per cent, specificity 58 per cent) for differentiating cancer from no cancer, and 0·744 (sensitivity 70 per cent, specificity 74 per cent) for differentiating adenocarcinoma from no cancer. CONCLUSION: Breath VOCs may distinguish patients with pancreatic cancer from those without cancer.

Journal article

Reccia I, Kumar J, Kusano T, Giakoustidis A, Zanellato A, Retsas P, Habib N, Jiao L, Spalding D, Pai Met al., 2018, Radiofrequency-assisted liver resection: Technique and results, Surgical Oncology, Vol: 27, Pages: 415-420, ISSN: 0960-7404

BackgroundRadiofrequency (RF)-assisted liver resection allows non-anatomical liver resection with reduced blood loss and offers the opportunity for a combination of resection and ablation. However, there are still concerns with regard to postoperative complications related to this technique. In the present study, we discuss the technical aspects of RF-assisted liver resections and analyse the rate of perioperative complications, focusing on post-hepatectomy liver failure (PLF), bile leak and abscess, and mortality.MethodsBetween 2001 and 2015, 857 consecutive open and laparoscopic elective RF-assisted liver resections for benign and malignant liver tumours were reviewed retrospectively to assess perioperative outcomes.ResultsMedian intraoperative blood loss was 130 mL, with 9.8% of patients requiring blood transfusion. Intra-abdominal collections requiring percutaneous drainage developed in 8.7% of all patients, while bile leak at resection margin developed in 2.8% of the cases. Major liver resection was performed in 34% of patients and the incidence of PLF was 1.5% with one directly related mortality (0.1%).ConclusionRF-assisted liver resection has evolved into a feasible and safe technique of liver resection with an acceptable incidence of perioperative morbidity and a low incidence of PLF and related mortality.

Journal article

Reccia I, Sodergren MH, Jayant K, Kurz E, Carneiro A, Spalding D, Pai M, Jiao L, Habib Net al., 2018, The journey of radiofrequency-assisted liver resection, Surgical Oncology, Vol: 27, Pages: A16-A18, ISSN: 0960-7404

Journal article

Sarker D, Plummer ER, Basu B, Meyer T, Huang K-W, Evans TRJ, Spalding D, Ma YT, Palmer DH, Chee CE, Habib NAet al., 2018, Preliminary results of a first-in-human, first-in-class phase I study of MTL-CEBPA, a small activating RNA (saRNA) targeting the transcription factor C/EBP-alpha in patients with advanced liver cancer., Publisher: AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, ISSN: 0732-183X

Conference paper

Kumar J, Reccia I, Sodergren MH, Kusano T, Zanellato A, Pai M, Spalding D, Zacharoulis D, Habib Net al., 2018, Radiofrequency assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for palliative surgical resection of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, Oncotarget, Vol: 9, Pages: 15732-15739, ISSN: 1949-2553

Background: Despite careful patient selection and preoperative investigations curative resection rate (R0) in pancreaticoduodenectomy ranges from 15% to 87%. Here we describe a new palliative approach for pancreaticoduodenectomy using a radiofrequency energy device to ablate tumor in situ in patients undergoing R1/R2 resections for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma where vascular reconstruction was not feasible. Results: There was neither postoperative mortality nor significant morbidity. Each time the ablation lasted less than 15 minutes. Following radiofrequency ablation it was observed that the tumor remnant attached to the vessel had shrunk significantly. In four patients this allowed easier separation and dissection of the ablated tumor from the adherent vessel leading to R1 resection. In the other two patients, the ablated tumor did not separate from vessel due to true tumor invasion and patients had an R2 resection. The ablated remnant part of the tumor was left in situ. Conclusion: Whenever pancreaticoduodenectomy with R0 resection cannot be achieved, this new palliative procedure could be considered in order to facilitate resection and enable maximum destruction in remnant tumors. Method: Six patients with suspected tumor infiltration and where vascular reconstruction was not warranted underwent radiofrequency-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Radiofrequency was applied across the tumor vertically 5-10 mm from the edge of the mesenteric and portal veins. Following ablation, the duodenum and the head of pancreas were removed after knife excision along the ablated line. The remaining ablated tissue was left in situ attached to the vessel.

Journal article

Loh WJ, Tharakan G, Todd J, Chahal H, Dhillo W, Martin N, Toumpanakis C, Caplin M, Spalding D, Meeran K, Tan T, Khoo Bet al., 2018, Sensitivity and Specificity of Insulin, C-Peptide and Nadir Glucose during 72 hr Supervised Fast in Diagnosis of Insulinoma, 15th Annual ENETS Conference for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumor Disease, Publisher: KARGER, Pages: 297-297, ISSN: 0028-3835

Conference paper

Khoo B, Boshier PR, Freethy A, Tharakan G, Saeed S, Hill N, Williams EL, Moorthy K, Tolley N, Jiao LR, Spalding D, Palazzo F, Meeran K, Tan Tet al., 2017, Redefining the stress cortisol response to surgery., Clinical Endocrinology, Vol: 87, Pages: 451-458, ISSN: 1365-2265

BACKGROUND: Cortisol levels rise with the physiological stress of surgery. Previous studies have used older, less-specific assays, have not differentiated by severity or only studied procedures of a defined type. The aim of this study was to examine this phenomenon in surgeries of varying severity using a widely used cortisol immunoassay. METHODS: Euadrenal patients undergoing elective surgery were enrolled prospectively. Serum samples were taken at 8 am on surgical day, induction and 1 hour, 2 hour, 4 hour and 8 hour after. Subsequent samples were taken daily at 8 am until postoperative day 5 or hospital discharge. Total cortisol was measured using an Abbott Architect immunoassay, and cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) using a radioimmunoassay. Surgical severity was classified by POSSUM operative severity score. RESULTS: Ninety-three patients underwent surgery: Major/Major+ (n = 37), Moderate (n = 33) and Minor (n = 23). Peak cortisol positively correlated to severity: Major/Major+ median 680 [range 375-1452], Moderate 581 [270-1009] and Minor 574 [272-1066] nmol/L (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = .0031). CBG fell by 23%; the magnitude of the drop positively correlated to severity. CONCLUSIONS: The range in baseline and peak cortisol response to surgery is wide, and peak cortisol levels are lower than previously appreciated. Improvements in surgery, anaesthetic techniques and cortisol assays might explain our observed lower peak cortisols. The criteria for the dynamic testing of cortisol response may need to be reduced to take account of these factors. Our data also support a lower-dose, stratified approach to dosing of steroid replacement in hypoadrenal patients, to minimize the deleterious effects of over-replacement.

Journal article

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