Imperial College London

DR. DANIEL MUNBLIT

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Honorary Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

daniel.munblit08 Website CV

 
 
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Location

 

Paediatric Research UnitQueen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

124 results found

Buonsenso D, Pazukhina E, Gentili C, Vetrugno L, Morello R, Zona M, De Matteis A, D'Ilario F, Lanni R, Rongai T, Del Balzo P, Fonte MT, Valente M, De Rose C, Munblit D, Sigfrid L, Valentini Pet al., 2022, The Prevalence, Characteristics and Risk Factors of Persistent Symptoms in Non-Hospitalized and Hospitalized Children with SARS-CoV-2 Infection Followed-Up for up to 12 Months: A Prospective, Cohort Study in Rome, Italy., J Clin Med, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2077-0383

Previous studies assessing the prevalence of COVID-19 sequelae in children have included either a small number of children or a short follow-up period, or have only focused on hospitalized children. We investigated the prevalence of persistent symptoms amongst children and assessed the risk factors, including the impact of variants. A prospective cohort study included children (≤18 years old) with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. The participants were assessed via telephone and face-to-face visits at 1-5, 6-9 and 12 or more months post-SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis using the ISARIC COVID-19 follow-up survey. Of the 679 children enrolled, 51% were female; 488 were infected during the wild virus wave, and 29 were infected with the Alpha, 42 with the Delta and 120 with the Omicron variants. Fatigue (19%), headache (12%), insomnia (7.5%), muscle pain (6.9%) and confusion with concentration issues (6.8%) were the most common persistent symptoms. Families reported an overall improvement over time, with 0.7% of parents interviewed at 12 months or more of the follow-up period reporting a poor recovery. Patients that had not recovered by 6-9 months had a lower probability of recovering during the next follow-up period. Children infected with a variant or the wild virus had an overall similar rate of persistent symptoms (although the pattern of reported symptoms differed significantly) and recovery rates. Conclusions: Recovery rates after SARS-CoV-2 infection improved as time passed from the initial infection, ranging from 4% of children having poor recovery at 1-5 months' follow-up to 1.3% at 6-9 months and 0.7% at 12 months. The patterns of persistence changed according to the variants involved at the time of infection. This study reinforces that a subgroup of children develop long-lasting persistent symptoms and highlights the need for further studies investigating the reasons behind the development of PCC.

Journal article

Baruch J, Rojek A, Kartsonaki C, Vijayaraghavan BKT, Gonçalves BP, Pritchard MG, Merson L, Dunning J, Hall M, Sigfrid L, Citarella BW, Murthy S, Yeabah TO, Olliaro Pet al., 2022, Symptom-based case definitions for COVID-19: Time and geographical variations for detection at hospital admission among 260,000 patients, Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses, Vol: 16, Pages: 1040-1050, ISSN: 1750-2640

Introduction: Case definitions are used to guide clinical practice, surveillance and research protocols. However, how they identify COVID-19-hospitalised patients is not fully understood. We analysed the proportion of hospitalised patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, in the ISARIC prospective cohort study database, meeting widely used case definitions. Methods: Patients were assessed using the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), World Health Organization (WHO) and UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) case definitions by age, region and time. Case fatality ratios (CFRs) and symptoms of those who did and who did not meet the case definitions were evaluated. Patients with incomplete data and non-laboratory-confirmed test result were excluded. Results: A total of 263,218 of the patients (42%) in the ISARIC database were included. Most patients (90.4%) were from Europe and Central Asia. The proportions of patients meeting the case definitions were 56.8% (WHO), 74.4% (UKHSA), 81.6% (ECDC) and 82.3% (CDC). For each case definition, patients at the extremes of age distribution met the criteria less frequently than those aged 30 to 70 years; geographical and time variations were also observed. Estimated CFRs were similar for the patients who met the case definitions. However, when more patients did not meet the case definition, the CFR increased. Conclusions: The performance of case definitions might be different in different regions and may change over time. Similarly concerning is the fact that older patients often did not meet case definitions, risking delayed medical care. While epidemiologists must balance their analytics with field applicability, ongoing revision of case definitions is necessary to improve patient care through early diagnosis and limit potential nosocomial spread.

Journal article

Munblit D, Greenhawt M, Brough HA, Pushkareva A, Karimova D, Demidova A, Warner JO, Kalayci O, Sediva A, Untersmayr E, Rodriguez del Rio P, Vazquez-Ortiz M, Arasi S, Alvaro-Lozano M, Tsabouri S, Galli E, Beken B, Eigenmann PAet al., 2022, Allergic diseases and immunodeficiencies in children, lessons learnt from COVID-19 pandemic by 2022: A statement from the EAACI-section on pediatrics, PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 33, ISSN: 0905-6157

Journal article

Leung ASY, Tham EH, Samuel M, Munblit D, Chu DK, Dahdah L, Yamamoto-Hanada K, Trikamjee T, Warad V, van Niekerk A, Martinez S, Ellis A, Bielory L, Cuadros G, van Bever H, Wallace D, Tang M, Sublett J, Wong GWKet al., 2022, Quality and consistency of clinical practice guidelines on the prevention of food allergy and atopic dermatitis: Systematic review protocol, WORLD ALLERGY ORGANIZATION JOURNAL, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1939-4551

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Munblit D, Shamji MH, 2022, Patient-oriented allergy, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 52, Pages: 1012-1014, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Khanh BT, Lang JJ, Compton K, Xu R, Acheson AR, Henrikson HJ, Kocarnik JM, Penberthy L, Aali A, Abbas Q, Abbasi B, Abbasi-Kangevari M, Abbasi-Kangevari Z, Abbastabar H, Abdelmasseh M, Abd-Elsalam S, Abdelwahab AA, Abdoli G, Abdulkadir HA, Abedi A, Abegaz KH, Abidi H, Aboagye RG, Abolhassani H, Absalan A, Abtew YD, Ali HA, Abu-Gharbieh E, Achappa B, Acuna JM, Addison D, Addo IY, Adegboye OA, Adesina MA, Adnan M, Adnani QES, Advani SM, Afrin S, Afzal MS, Aggarwal M, Ahinkorah BO, Ahmad AR, Ahmad R, Ahmad S, Ahmadi S, Ahmed H, Ahmed LA, Ahmed MB, Rashid TA, Aiman W, Ajami M, Akalu GT, Akbarzadeh-Khiavi M, Aklilu A, Akonde M, Akunna CJ, Al Hamad H, Alahdab F, Alanezi FM, Alanzi TM, Alessy SA, Algammal AM, Al-Hanawi MK, Alhassan RK, Ali BA, Ali L, Ali SS, Alimohamadi Y, Alipour V, Aljunid SM, Alkhayyat M, Al-Maweri SAA, Almustanyir S, Alonso N, Alqalyoobi S, Al-Raddadi RM, Al-Rifai RHH, Al-Sabah SK, Al-Tammemi AB, Altawalah H, Alvis-Guzman N, Amare F, Ameyaw EK, Dehkordi JJA, Amirzade-Iranaq MH, Amu H, Amusa GA, Ancuceanu R, Anderson JA, Animut YA, Anoushiravani A, Anoushirvani AA, Ansari-Moghaddam A, Ansha MG, Antony B, Antwi MH, Anwar SL, Anwer R, Anyasodor AE, Arabloo J, Arab-Zozani M, Aremu O, Argaw AM, Ariffin H, Aripov T, Arshad M, Al A, Arulappan J, Aruleba RT, Aryannejad A, Asaad M, Asemahagn MA, Asemi Z, Asghari-Jafarabadi M, Ashraf T, Assadi R, Athar M, Athari SS, Null MMWA, Attia S, Aujayeb A, Ausloos M, Avila-Burgos L, Awedew AF, Awoke MA, Awoke T, Quintanilla BPA, Ayana TM, Ayen SS, Azadi D, Null SA, Azami-Aghdash S, Azanaw MM, Azangou-Khyavy M, Jafari AA, Azizi H, Azzam AYY, Babajani A, Badar M, Badiye AD, Baghcheghi N, Bagheri N, Bagherieh S, Bahadory S, Baig AA, Baker JL, Bakhtiari A, Bakshi RK, Banach M, Banerjee I, Bardhan M, Barone-Adesi F, Barra F, Barrow A, Bashir NZ, Bashiri A, Basu S, Batiha A-MM, Begum A, Bekele AB, Belay AS, Belete MA, Belgaumi UI, Bell AW, Belo L, Benzian H, Berhie AY, Bermudez ANC, Bernabe E, Bhagavathula AS, Bhala N, Bhandariet al., 2022, The global burden of cancer attributable to risk factors, 2010-19: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019, LANCET, Vol: 400, Pages: 563-591, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Allen H, Pendower U, Santer M, Groetch M, Cohen M, Murch S, Williams H, Munblit D, Katz Y, Gupta N, Adil S, Baines J, de Bont EGPM, Ridd M, Sibson V, McFadden A, Koplin J, Munene J, Perkin M, Sicherer S, Boyle Ret al., 2022, An international Delphi consensus study on the detection and management of milk allergy, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 1043-1044, ISSN: 0954-7894

Conference paper

Munblit D, Warner J, 2022, Prevalence and risk factors of post-COVID-19 condition in adults and children at 6 and 12 months after hospital discharge: a prospective, cohort study in Moscow (Stop COVID), BMC Medicine, Vol: 20, ISSN: 1741-7015

Background Previous studies assessing the prevalence of COVID-19 sequelae in adults and children were performed in the absence of an agreed definition. We investigated prevalence of post-COVID-19 condition (PCC) (WHO definition), at 6- and 12-months follow-up, among previously hospitalised adults and children and assessed risk factors.MethodsProspective cohort study of children and adults with confirmed COVID-19 in Moscow, hospitalised between April and August, 2020. Two follow-up telephone interviews, using the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium survey, were performed at 6 and 12 months after discharge.Results1013 of 2509 (40%) of adults and 360 of 849 (42%) of children discharged participated in both the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. PCC prevalence was 50% (95%CI 47 – 53) in adults and 20% (95%CI 16 - 24) in children at 6 months, with decline to 34% (95%CI 31 - 37) and 11% (95%CI 8 - 14), respectively, at 12 months. In adults, female sex was associated with PCC at 6- and 12-month follow-up (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.57 to 2.65) and (OR 2.04, 1.54 to 2.69), respectively. Pre-existing hypertension (OR 1.42, 1.04 to 1.94) was associated with post-COVID-19 condition at 12 months. In children, neurological comorbidities were associated with PCC both at 6 months (OR 4.38, 1.36 to 15.67) and 12 months (OR 8.96, 2.55 to 34.82) while allergic respiratory diseases were associated at 12 months (OR 2.66, 1.04 to 6.47).ConclusionsAlthough prevalence of PCC declined one year after discharge, one in three adults and one in ten children experienced ongoing sequelae. In adults, females and persons with pre-existing hypertension, and in children, persons with neurological comorbidities or allergic respiratory diseases are at higher risk of PCC.

Journal article

Munblit D, Nicholson T, Akrami A, Apfelbacher C, Chen J, De Groote W, Diaz J, Gorst SL, Harman N, Kokorina A, Olliaro P, Parr C, Preller J, Schiess N, Schmitt J, Seylanova N, Simpson F, Tong A, Needham DM, Williamson PRet al., 2022, A core outcome set for post-COVID-19 condition in adults for use in clinical practice and research: an international Delphi consensus study, LANCET RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 10, Pages: 715-724, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Allen HI, Pendower U, Santer M, Groetch M, Cohen M, Murch SH, Williams HC, Munblit D, Katz Y, Gupta N, Adil S, Baines J, Bont EGPMD, Ridd M, Sibson VL, McFadden A, Koplin JJ, Munene J, Perkin MR, Sicherer SH, Boyle RJet al., 2022, Detection and management of milk allergy: Delphi consensus study, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, Vol: 52, Pages: 848-858, ISSN: 0954-7894

BackgroundThere is significant overdiagnosis of milk allergy in young children in some countries, leading to unnecessary use of specialised formula. This guidance, developed by experts without commercial ties to the formula industry, aims to reduce milk allergy overdiagnosis and support carers of children with suspected milk allergy.MethodsDelphi study involving two rounds of anonymous consensus building and an open meeting between January and July 2021. Seventeen experts in general practice, nutrition, midwifery, health visiting, lactation support and relevant areas of paediatrics participated, located in Europe, North America, Middle East, Africa, Australia, and Asia. Five authors of previous milk allergy guidelines and seven parents provided feedback.FindingsParticipants agreed on 38 essential recommendations through consensus. Recommendations highlighted the importance of reproducibility and specificity for diagnosing milk allergy in children with acute or delayed symptoms temporally related to milk protein ingestion; and distinguished between children directly consuming milk protein and exclusively breastfed infants. Consensus was reached that maternal dietary restriction is not usually necessary to manage milk allergy, and that for exclusively breastfed infants with chronic symptoms, milk allergy diagnosis should only be considered in specific, rare circumstances. Consensus was reached that milk allergy diagnosis does not need to be considered for stool changes, aversive feeding, or occasional spots of blood in stool, if there is no temporal relationship with milk protein ingestion. When compared with previous guidelines, these consensus recommendations resulted in more restrictive criteria for detecting milk allergy and a more limited role for maternal dietary exclusions and specialised formula.InterpretationThese new milk allergy recommendations from non-conflicted, multidisciplinary experts advise narrower criteria, more prominent support for breastfeeding

Journal article

Munblit D, O'Hara ME, Akrami A, Perego E, Olliaro P, Needham DMet al., 2022, Long COVID: aiming for a consensus Comment, LANCET RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 10, Pages: 632-634, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Munblit D, Buonsenso D, Sigfrid L, Vijverberg SJH, Brackel CLHet al., 2022, Post-COVID-19 condition in children: a COS is urgently needed Comment, LANCET RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 10, Pages: 628-629, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Armocida B, Monasta L, Sawyer S, Bustreo F, Segafredo G, Castelpietra G, Ronfani L, Pasovic M, Hay S, Perel P, Beran D, Armocida B, Monasta L, Sawyer SM, Bustreo F, Segafredo G, Castelpietra G, Ronfani L, Pasovic M, Hay SI, Abila DB, Abolhassani H, Accrombessi MMK, Adekanmbi V, Ahmadi K, Al Hamad H, Aldeyab MA, Al-Jumaily A, Ancuceanu R, Andrei CL, Andrei T, Arumugam A, Attia S, Aujayeb A, Ausloos M, Baker JL, Barone-Adesi F, Barra F, Barteit S, Basu S, Baune BT, Béjot Y, Belo L, Bennett DA, Bikbov B, Bikov A, Blyuss O, Breitner S, Brenner H, Carreras G, Carvalho M, Catapano AL, Chandan JS, Charalampous P, Chen S, Conde J, Cruz-Martins N, Damiani G, Dastiridou A, de la Torre-Luque A, Dianatinasab M, Dias da Silva D, Douiri A, Dragioti E, Engelbert Bain L, Fagbamigbe AF, Fereshtehnejad S-M, Ferrara P, Ferreira de Oliveira JMP, Ferrero S, Ferro Desideri L, Fischer F, Fonseca DA, Gaewkhiew P, Gaihre S, Gallus S, Gaspar Fonseca M, Gill PS, Glasbey JC, Gorini G, Gupta VK, Gurara MK, Haro JM, Hasan MT, Havmoeller RJ, Heibati B, Hellemons ME, Herteliu C, Hussain S, Isola G, Johnson O, Jonas JB, Jozwiak JJ, Jürisson M, Kabir Z, Karch A, Kauppila JH, Kayode GA, Khan MAB, Khatab K, Kivimäki M, Klugar M, Klugarová J, Koly KN, Koyanagi A, Kurmi OP, Kusuma D, La Vecchia C, Lacey B, Lallukka T, Lamnisos D, Langguth B, Larsson AO, Lauriola P, Lee PH, Leonardi M, Li A, Linehan C, López-Bueno R, Lorkowski S, Loureiro JA, Lunevicius R, Magee LA, Magnani FG, Majeed A, Makris KC, Mathioudakis AG, Mathur MR, McGrath JJ, Menezes RG, Mentis A-FA, Meretoja A, Mestrovic T, Miao Jonasson J, Miazgowski T, Mirica A, Moccia M, Mohammed S, Molokhia M, Mondello S, Mueller UO, Mulita F, Munblit D, Negoi I, Negoi RI, Nena E, Noor NM, Nowak C, Ntaios G, Nwatah VE, Oancea B, Oguntade AS, Ortiz A, Otoiu A, Padron-Monedero A, Palladino R, Pana A, Panagiotakos D, Panda-Jonas S, Pardhan S, Patel J, Pedersini P, Peñalvo JL, Pensato U, Pereira RB, Perico N, Petcu I-R, Polinder S, Postma MJ, Rabiee M, Rabieet al., 2022, Burden of non-communicable diseases among adolescents aged 10–24 years in the EU, 1990–2019: a systematic analysis of the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2019, The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, Vol: 6, Pages: 367-383, ISSN: 2352-4642

BackgroundDisability and mortality burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have risen worldwide; however, the NCD burden among adolescents remains poorly described in the EU.MethodsEstimates were retrieved from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2019. Causes of NCDs were analysed at three different levels of the GBD 2019 hierarchy, for which mortality, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were extracted. Estimates, with the 95% uncertainty intervals (UI), were retrieved for EU Member States from 1990 to 2019, three age subgroups (10–14 years, 15–19 years, and 20–24 years), and by sex. Spearman's correlation was conducted between DALY rates for NCDs and the Socio-demographic Index (SDI) of each EU Member State.FindingsIn 2019, NCDs accounted for 86·4% (95% uncertainty interval 83·5–88·8) of all YLDs and 38·8% (37·4–39·8) of total deaths in adolescents aged 10–24 years. For NCDs in this age group, neoplasms were the leading causes of both mortality (4·01 [95% uncertainty interval 3·62–4·25] per 100 000 population) and YLLs (281·78 [254·25–298·92] per 100 000 population), whereas mental disorders were the leading cause for YLDs (2039·36 [1432·56–2773·47] per 100 000 population) and DALYs (2040·59 [1433·96–2774·62] per 100 000 population) in all EU Member States, and in all studied age groups. In 2019, among adolescents aged 10–24 years, males had a higher mortality rate per 100 000 population due to NCDs than females (11·66 [11·04–12·28] vs 7·89 [7·53–8·23]), whereas females presented a higher DALY rate per 100 000 population due to NCDs (8003·25 [5812·78–10&thi

Journal article

Wulf Hanson S, Abbafati C, Aerts JG, Al-Aly Z, Ashbaugh C, Ballouz T, Blyuss O, Bobkova P, Bonsel G, Borzakova S, Buonsenso D, Butnaru D, Carter A, Chu H, De Rose C, Diab MM, Ekbom E, El Tantawi M, Fomin V, Frithiof R, Gamirova A, Glybochko PV, Haagsma JA, Javanmard SH, Hamilton EB, Harris G, Heijenbrok-Kal MH, Helbok R, Hellemons ME, Hillus D, Huijts SM, Hultström M, Jassat W, Kurth F, Larsson I-M, Lipcsey M, Liu C, Loflin CD, Malinovschi A, Mao W, Mazankova L, McCulloch D, Menges D, Mohammadifard N, Munblit D, Nekliudov NA, Ogbuoji O, Osmanov IM, Peñalvo JL, Petersen MS, Puhan MA, Rahman M, Rass V, Reinig N, Ribbers GM, Ricchiuto A, Rubertsson S, Samitova E, Sarrafzadegan N, Shikhaleva A, Simpson KE, Sinatti D, Soriano JB, Spiridonova E, Steinbeis F, Svistunov AA, Valentini P, van de Water BJ, van den Berg-Emons R, Wallin E, Witzenrath M, Wu Y, Xu H, Zoller T, Adolph C, Albright J, Amlag JO, Aravkin AY, Bang-Jensen BL, Bisignano C, Castellano R, Castro E, Chakrabarti S, Collins JK, Dai X, Daoud F, Dapper C, Deen A, Duncan BB, Erickson M, Ewald SB, Ferrari AJ, Flaxman AD, Fullman N, Gamkrelidze A, Giles JR, Guo G, Hay SI, He J, Helak M, Hulland EN, Kereselidze M, Krohn KJ, Lazzar-Atwood A, Lindstrom A, Lozano R, Magistro B, Malta DC, Månsson J, Mantilla Herrera AM, Mokdad AH, Monasta L, Nomura S, Pasovic M, Pigott DM, Reiner RC, Reinke G, Ribeiro ALP, Santomauro DF, Sholokhov A, Spurlock EE, Walcott R, Walker A, Wiysonge CS, Zheng P, Bettger JP, Murray CJ, Vos Tet al., 2022, A global systematic analysis of the occurrence, severity, and recovery pattern of long COVID in 2020 and 2021., medRxiv

IMPORTANCE: While much of the attention on the COVID-19 pandemic was directed at the daily counts of cases and those with serious disease overwhelming health services, increasingly, reports have appeared of people who experience debilitating symptoms after the initial infection. This is popularly known as long COVID. OBJECTIVE: To estimate by country and territory of the number of patients affected by long COVID in 2020 and 2021, the severity of their symptoms and expected pattern of recovery. DESIGN: We jointly analyzed ten ongoing cohort studies in ten countries for the occurrence of three major symptom clusters of long COVID among representative COVID cases. The defining symptoms of the three clusters (fatigue, cognitive problems, and shortness of breath) are explicitly mentioned in the WHO clinical case definition. For incidence of long COVID, we adopted the minimum duration after infection of three months from the WHO case definition. We pooled data from the contributing studies, two large medical record databases in the United States, and findings from 44 published studies using a Bayesian meta-regression tool. We separately estimated occurrence and pattern of recovery in patients with milder acute infections and those hospitalized. We estimated the incidence and prevalence of long COVID globally and by country in 2020 and 2021 as well as the severity-weighted prevalence using disability weights from the Global Burden of Disease study. RESULTS: Analyses are based on detailed information for 1906 community infections and 10526 hospitalized patients from the ten collaborating cohorts, three of which included children. We added published data on 37262 community infections and 9540 hospitalized patients as well as ICD-coded medical record data concerning 1.3 million infections. Globally, in 2020 and 2021, 144.7 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 54.8-312.9) people suffered from any of the three symptom clusters of long COVID. This corresponds to 3.69% (1.38-7.

Journal article

Gamirova A, Berbenyuk A, Levina D, Peshko D, Simpson MR, Azad MB, Jaervinen KM, Brough HA, Genuneit J, Greenhawt M, Verhasselt V, Peroni DG, Perkin MR, Warner JO, Palmer DJ, Boyle RJ, Munblit Det al., 2022, Food Proteins in Human Breast Milk and Probability of IgE-Mediated Allergic Reaction in Children During Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 10, Pages: 1312-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Brackel C, Noij L, Legghe CL, Vijverberg S, Hashimoto S, Maitland-van der Zee A, Munblit D, Stephenson T, Buonsenso D, Ryd-Rinder M, Miller DW, Edwards AM, Mcvoy M, Terheggen SWJet al., 2022, Uniting Global Efforts on Pediatric Long-COVID: Results of the < bold > I</bold>nternational < bold > P</bold>ost < bold > C</bold>OVID < bold > C</bold>onditionin < bold > C</bold>hildren < bold ><bold>C </bold ></bold>ollaboration (IP4C), International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Buonsenso D, Munblit D, Pazukhina E, Ricchiuto A, Sinatti D, Zona M, De Matteis A, D'Ilario F, Gentili C, Lanni R, Rongai T, del Balzo P, Fonte MT, Valente M, Zampino G, De Rose C, Sigfrid L, Valentini Pet al., 2022, Post-COVID Condition in Adults and Children Living in the Same Household in Italy: A Prospective Cohort Study Using the ISARIC Global Follow-Up Protocol, FRONTIERS IN PEDIATRICS, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2296-2360

Journal article

Buonsenso D, Pujol FE, Munblit D, Pata D, McFarland S, Simpson FKet al., 2022, Clinical characteristics, activity levels and mental health problems in children with long coronavirus disease: a survey of 510 children, FUTURE MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 17, Pages: 577-588, ISSN: 1746-0913

Journal article

Buonsenso D, Di Gennaro L, De Rose C, Morello R, D'Ilario F, Zampino G, Piazza M, Boner AL, Iraci C, O'Connell S, Cohen VB, Esposito S, Munblit D, Reena J, Sigfrid L, Valentini Pet al., 2022, Long-term outcomes of pediatric infections: from traditional infectious diseases to long covid, FUTURE MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 17, Pages: 551-571, ISSN: 1746-0913

Journal article

Dirr MA, Alam M, Apfelbacher C, Drewitz K-P, Kang BY, Munblit D, Nekliudov N, Seylanova Net al., 2022, Improvements and advances in core outcome set methodology: proceedings of the CS-COUSIN & COMFA Joint Meeting, ARCHIVES OF DERMATOLOGICAL RESEARCH, ISSN: 0340-3696

Journal article

Munblit D, Simpson F, Mabbitt J, Dunn-Galvin A, Semple C, Warner JOet al., 2022, Legacy of COVID-19 infection in children: long-COVID will have a lifelong health/economic impact, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD, Vol: 107, ISSN: 0003-9888

Journal article

Munblit D, Parr C, Chen J, Warner Jet al., 2022, Studying the Post-COVID-19 condition: research challenges, strategies and importance of Core Outcome Set development, BMC Medicine, Vol: 20, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1741-7015

Background A substantial portion of people with COVID-19 subsequently experience lasting symptoms including fatigue, shortness of breath and neurological complaints such as cognitive dysfunction many months after acute infection. Emerging evidence suggests that this condition, commonly referred to as Long COVID but also known as Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) or post-COVID-19 condition, could become a significant global health burden. Main textWhile the number of studies investigating the post-COVID-19 condition is increasing, there is no agreement on how this new disease should be defined and diagnosed in clinical practice and what relevant outcomes to measure. There is an urgent need to optimise and standardise outcome measures for this important patient group both for clinical services and for research and to allow comparing and pooling of data. ConclusionsA Core Outcome Set for post-COVID-19 condition should be developed in the shortest time frame possible, for improvement in data quality, harmonisation, and comparability between different geographical locations. We call for a global initiative, involving all relevant partners, including, but not limited to, healthcare professionals, researchers, methodologists, patients, and caregivers. We urge coordinated actions aiming to develop a Core Outcome Set (COS) for post-COVID-19 condition in both the adult and paediatric populations.

Journal article

Osmanov IM, Spiridonova E, Bobkova P, Gamirova A, Shikhaleva A, Andreeva M, Blyuss O, El-Taravi Y, DunnGalvin A, Comberiati P, Peroni DG, Apfelbacher C, Genuneit J, Mazankova L, Miroshina A, Chistyakova E, Samitova E, Borzakova S, Bondarenko E, Korsunskiy AA, Konova I, Hanson SW, Carson G, Sigfrid L, Scott JT, Greenhawt M, Whittaker EA, Garralda E, Swann O, Buonsenso D, Nicholls DE, Simpson F, Jones C, Semple MG, Warner JO, Vos T, Olliaro P, Munblit D, Sechenov StopCOVID Research Teamet al., 2022, Risk factors for long covid in previoulsy hospitalsied children using the ISARIC Global Follow-Up Protocol: a prospective cohort study, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 59, ISSN: 0903-1936

Background The long-term sequelae of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) in children remain poorly characterised. This study aimed to assess long-term outcomes in children previously hospitalised with Covid-19 and associated risk factors.Methods This is a prospective cohort study of children (≤18 years old) admitted with confirmed Covid-19. Children admitted to the hospital between April 2, 2020 and August 26, 2020, were included. Telephone interview using the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) Covid-19 Health and Wellbeing paediatric follow-up survey. Persistent symptoms (>5 months) were further categorised by system(s) involved.Findings 518 of 853 (61%) of eligible children were available for the follow-up assessment and included in the study. Median age was 10.4 years (IQR, 3–15.2) and 270 (52.1%) were girls; median follow-up since hospital discharge was 256 (223–271) days. At the time of the follow-up interview 126 (24.3%) participants reported persistent symptoms among which fatigue (53, 10.7%), sleep disturbance (36, 6.9%,) and sensory problems (29, 5.6%) were the most common. Multiple symptoms were experienced by 44 (8.4%) participants. Risk factors for persistent symptoms were: older age “6–11 years” (odds ratio 2.74 (95% confidence interval 1.37 to 5.75) and “12–18 years” (2.68, 1.41 to 5.4); and a history of allergic diseases (1.67, 1.04 to 2.67).Interpretation A quarter of children experienced persistent symptoms months after hospitalization with acute covid-19 infection, with almost one in ten experiencing multi-system involvement. Older age and allergic diseases were associated with higher risk of persistent symptoms at follow-up.

Journal article

Levina D, Leontjeva M, Abbasova N, Petrova Y, Bitieva R, Erdes SI, Aminova AI, Nurtazina A, Blyuss B, Pikuza M, Avdeenko NV, Gadetskaya S, Ivanova YV, Saglani S, Bush A, Munblit Det al., 2022, Changes in blood eosinophil levels in early childhood and asthma development: A case-control study, PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 33, ISSN: 0905-6157

Journal article

Warner JO, Warner JA, Munblit D, 2022, Hypotheses to explain the associations between asthma and the consequences of COVID-19 infection., Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Vol: 52, Pages: 7-9, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Childs CE, Munblit D, Ulfman L, Gomez-Gallego C, Lehtoranta L, Recker T, Salminen S, Tiemessen M, Collado MCet al., 2021, Potential Biomarkers, Risk Factors, and Their Associations with IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life: A Narrative Review, ADVANCES IN NUTRITION, Vol: 13, Pages: 633-651, ISSN: 2161-8313

Journal article

ISARIC Clinical Characterisation Group, 2021, The value of open-source clinical science in pandemic response: lessons from ISARIC., Lancet Infectious Diseases, Vol: 21, Pages: 1623-1624, ISSN: 1473-3099

Journal article

Genuneit J, Jayasinghe S, Riggioni C, Peters RL, Chu DK, Munblit D, Boyle RJ, Du Toit G, Skypala I, Santos AFet al., 2021, Protocol for a systematic review of the diagnostic test accuracy of tests for IgE-mediated food allergy, PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 33, ISSN: 0905-6157

Journal article

Barker S, Daniels L, Chang Y-S, Chikovani T, DunnGalvin A, Gerdts JD, Gerth Van Wijk R, Gibbs T, Villarreal Gonzalez RV, Guzman-Avilan RI, Hanna H, Hossny E, Kolotilina A, Ortega Martell JA, Pacharn P, de Lira Quezada CE, Sibanda E, Stukus D, Tham EH, Venter C, Gonzalez-Diaz SN, Levin ME, Martin B, Warner JO, Munblit Det al., 2021, Allergy education and training for physicians., World Allergy Organ J, Vol: 14, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 1939-4551

The increasing prevalence of allergic diseases has placed a significant burden on global healthcare and society as whole. This has necessitated a rapid development of "allergy" as a specialist area. However, as allergy is so common and, for most, relatively easy to diagnose and control, all clinicians need to have basic knowledge and competence  to manage  mild disease and recognize when referral is required. The allergology specialty has not yet been recognized in many countries and even where allergy is fully recognized as a specialty, the approach to training in allergy differs significantly. In the light of recent developments in allergy diagnosis and management, there is an urgent need to harmonize core competences for physicians, as well as the standardization of core principles for medical education and post-graduate training in allergy. All physicians and allied health professionals must appreciate the multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to allergy, which is key to achieving the highest standards in holistic care. Due to worldwide variation in resources and personnel, some MDT roles will need to be absorbed by the treating physician or other healthcare professionals. We draw particular attention to the role of psychological input for all allergy patients, dietetic input in the case of food allergy and patient education to support all patients in the supported self-management of their condition on a daily basis. A strong appreciation of these multidisciplinary aspects will help physicians provide quality patient-centered care. We consider that harmonization of allergy components within undergraduate curricula is crucial to ensure all physicians develop the appropriate allergy-related knowledge and skills, particularly in light of inconsistencies seen in the primary care management of allergy. This review from the World Allergy Organization (WAO) Education and Training Committee also outlines allergy-related competences required

Journal article

Greenhawt M, Abrams EM, Shaker M, Chu DK, Kahn D, Akin C, Alqurashi W, Arkwright P, Baldwin JL, Ben-Shoshan M, Bernstein J, Bingeman T, Blumchen K, Byrne A, Bognanni A, Campbell D, Campbell R, Chagla Z, Chan ES, Chan J, Comberiatti P, Dribin TE, Ellis AK, Fleischer DM, Fox A, Frischmeyer-Guerrerio PA, Gagnon R, Grayson MH, Horner CC, Hourihane J, Katelaris CH, Kim H, Kelso JM, Lang D, Ledford D, Levin M, Lieberman J, Loh R, Mack D, Mazer B, Mosnaim G, Munblit D, Mustafa SS, Nanda A, Oppenheimer J, Perrett KP, Ramsey A, Rank M, Robertson K, Shiek J, Spergel JM, Stukus D, Tang ML, Tracy JM, Turner PJ, Whalen-Browne A, Wallace D, Wang J, Wasserman S, Witty JK, Worm M, Vander Leek TK, Golden DBet al., 2021, The risk of allergic reaction to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and recommended evaluation and management: a systematic review, meta-analysis, GRADE assessment, and international consensus approach, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Vol: 9, Pages: 3546-3567, ISSN: 2213-2198

Concerns for anaphylaxis may hamper SARS-CoV-2 immunization efforts. We convened a multi-disciplinary group of international experts in anaphylaxis comprised of allergy, infectious disease, emergency medicine, and front-line clinicians to systematically develop recommendations regarding SARS-CoV-2 vaccine immediate allergic reactions. Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, the WHO global coronavirus database, and the grey literature (inception-March 19, 2021) were systematically searched. Paired reviewers independently selected studies addressing anaphylaxis after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polysorbate allergy, and accuracy of allergy testing for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine allergy. Random effects models synthesized the data to inform recommendations based on the GRADE approach, agreed upon using a modified Delphi panel. The incidence of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine anaphylaxis is 7.91 cases/million (n=41,000,000 vaccinations, 95%CI 4.02-15.59; 26 studies, moderate certainty), the prevalence of PEG allergy is 103 cases/million (95%CI 88-120; 2 studies, very low certainty), and the sensitivity for PEG skin testing is poor though specificity is high (15 studies, very low certainty). We recommend vaccination over either no vaccination or performing SARS-CoV-2 vaccine/excipient screening allergy testing for individuals without history of a severe allergic reaction to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine/excipient, and a shared decision-making paradigm in consultation with an allergy specialist for individuals with a history of a severe allergic reaction to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine/excipient. We recommend further research to clarify SARS-CoV-2 vaccine/vaccine excipient testing utility in individuals potentially allergic to SARS-CoV2 vaccines or their excipients.

Journal article

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