Imperial College London

DrElaineBurns

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 1947e.burns

 
 
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Location

 

Rm. 1029Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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64 results found

Arhi CS, Ziprin P, Bottle A, Burns EM, Aylin P, Darzi Aet al., 2019, Colorectal cancer patients under the age of 50 experience delays in primary care leading to emergency diagnoses: a population-based study, Colorectal Disease, Vol: 21, Pages: 1270-1278, ISSN: 1462-8910

AIM: The incidence of colorectal cancer in the under 50s is increasing. In this national population-based study we aim to show that missed opportunities for diagnosis in primary care are leading to referral delays and emergency diagnoses in young patients. METHOD: We compared the interval before diagnosis, presenting symptom(s) and the odds ratio (OR) of an emergency diagnosis for those under the age of 50 with older patients sourced from the cancer registry with linkage to a national database of primary-care records. RESULTS: The study included 7315 patients, of whom 508 (6.9%) were aged under 50 years, 1168 (16.0%) were aged 50-59, 2294 (31.4%) were aged 60-69 and 3345 (45.7%) were aged 70-79 years. Young patients were more likely to present with abdominal pain and via an emergency, and had the lowest percentage of early stage cancer. They experienced a longer interval between referral and diagnosis (12.5 days) than those aged 60-69, reflecting the higher proportion of referrals via the nonurgent pathway (33.3%). The OR of an emergency diagnosis did not differ with age if a red-flag symptom was noted at presentation, but increased significantly for young patients if the symptom was nonspecific. CONCLUSION: Young patients present to primary care with symptoms outside the national referral guidelines, increasing the likelihood of an emergency diagnosis.

Journal article

Arhi CS, Markar S, Burns EM, Bouras G, Bottle A, Hanna G, Aylin P, Ziprin P, Darzi Aet al., 2019, Delays in referral from primary care are associated with a worse survival in patients with esophagogastric cancer, Diseases of the Esophagus, Vol: 32, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1120-8694

NICE referral guidelines for suspected cancer were introduced to improve prognosis by reducing referral delays. However, over 20% of patients with esophagogastric cancer experience three or more consultations before referral. In this retrospective cohort study, we hypothesize that such a delay is associated with a worse survival compared with patients referred earlier. By utilizing Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a national primary care linked database, the first presentation, referral date, a number of consultations before referral and stage for esophagogastric cancer patients were determined. The risk of a referral after one or two consultations compared with three or more consultations was calculated for age and the presence of symptom fulfilling the NICE criteria. The risk of death according to the number of consultations before referral was determined, while accounting for stage and surgical management. 1307 patients were included. Patients referred after one (HR 0.80 95% CI 0.68-0.93 p = 0.005) or two consultations (HR 0.81 95% CI 0.67-0.98 p = 0.034) demonstrated significantly improved prognosis compared with those referred later. The risk of death was also lower for patients who underwent a resection, were younger or had an earlier stage at diagnosis. Those presenting with a symptom fulfilling the NICE criteria (OR 0.27 95% CI 0.21-0.35 p < 0.0001) were more likely to be referred earlier. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between a delay in referral and worse prognosis in esophagogastric patients. These findings should prompt further research to reduce primary care delays.

Journal article

Arhi CS, Burns EM, Bouras G, Aylin P, Ziprin P, Darzi Aet al., 2019, Complications after discharge and delays in adjuvant chemotherapy following colonic resection: a cohort study of linked primary and secondary care data, Colorectal Disease, Vol: 21, Pages: 307-314, ISSN: 1462-8910

AIM: By understanding the reasons for delays in adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) after colonic resection, there is the potential to improve patient outcome. The aim of this study is to determine the extent and impact of complications after hospital discharge on delays to AC. METHOD: The study cohort included patients from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) who had a colorectal cancer resection; linkage to primary care data was provided by the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Complications during the index hospital stay (from HES) and after discharge (from CPRD) were compared. The risk of late AC treatment (8 weeks or later) following a complication, stoma at the index procedure or emergency admission was described after accounting for age and Charlson score. A Cox hazards model determined the association of these factors with overall survival (OS). RESULTS: A total of 1266 patients underwent AC following colon cancer resection, of whom 598 (47.2%) received treatment within 8 weeks. Patients receiving late AC had a significantly higher proportion of re-operations (7.0% vs 3.3% P < 0.005) and wound infections (5.5% vs 3.7% P = 0.042), with 96% of the latter only being noted in CPRD. In multivariate analysis, the risk of AC delay significantly increased following a complication (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16-2.03, P = 0.003) or a stoma at the index operation. AC delay was associated with worse OS [hazard ratio (HR) 1.44, 95% CI 1.16-1.79, P = 0.001], as was an emergency admission (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.21-1.98, P < 0.0005). However, the presence of a complication did not independently reduce OS (HR 1.15, 95%CI 0.89-1.48, P = 0.295). CONCLUSION: The true extent and impact of complications following colonic resection is underestimated when only secondary care data are used.

Journal article

Arhi CS, Bottle A, Burns EM, Clarke JM, Aylin P, Ziprin P, Darzi Aet al., 2018, Comparison of cancer diagnosis recording between the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Cancer Registry and Hospital Episodes Statistics, Cancer Epidemiology, Vol: 57, Pages: 148-157, ISSN: 0361-090X

IntroductionThe Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) is a large electronic dataset of primary care medical records. For the purpose of epidemiological studies, it is necessary to ensure accuracy and completeness of cancer diagnoses in CPRD.MethodCases included had a colorectal, oesophagogastric (OG), breast, prostate or lung cancer diagnosis recorded in a least one of CPRD, Cancer Registry (CR) or Hospital Episodes Statistics(HES) between 2000 and 2013. Agreement in diagnosis between the datasets, difference in dates, survival at one and five-years, and whether patient characteristics differed according to the dataset or the timing of diagnosis were investigated.Results116,769 patients were included. For each cancer, approximately 10% of cases identified from CPRD or HES were not confirmed in the CR. 25.5% colorectal, 26.0% OG, 8.9% breast, 32.0% lung and 18.6% prostate cases identified from the CR were missing in CPRD. The diagnosis date was recorded later in CPRD compared with CR for each cancer, ranging from 81.1% for prostate to 59.6% for colorectal, especially if the diagnosis was an emergency. Compared with the CR and HES, the adjusted risk of a missing diagnosis in CPRD was significantly higher if the patient was older, had more co-morbidities or was diagnosed as an emergency. Survival at one and five-years was highest for CPRD.ConclusionPatient demographics and the route of diagnosis impact the accuracy of cancer diagnosis in CPRD. Although CPRD provides invaluable primary care data, patients should ideally be identified from the CR to reduce bias.

Journal article

Sinha A, Burns EM, Latchford A, Clark SKet al., 2018, Risk of desmoid formation after laparoscopic versus open colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis for familial adenomatous polyposis, BJS Open, Vol: 2, Pages: 452-455, ISSN: 2474-9842

Background: Laparoscopy is used increasingly in prophylactic surgery for patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) undergoing colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA). Little is known about the impact of laparoscopy on subsequent desmoid risk. This study documented the risk of desmoid in patients undergoing laparoscopic and open IRA. Methods: This was an observational study of patients with FAP and known germline APC mutation, undergoing IRA at a tertiary referral centre between 1996 and 2016. Patients were retrieved from a prospectively maintained polyposis registry. Data included genotype, family history of desmoid, sex, surgical approach at IRA and postoperative complications. The main outcome was development of either a clinically or radiologically significant desmoid. Results: Some 112 patients (61 female) underwent colectomy and IRA. A laparoscopic approach was used in 69 patients (61·6 per cent). Baseline characteristics did not differ between patients having an open or laparoscopic approach. Median follow-up was 5·8 (i.q.r. 2·4-11·2) years. Patients who underwent laparoscopic IRA had a reduced risk of desmoid formation (3 of 69 (4 per cent) versus 7 of 43 (16 per cent) in the open group; P = 0·043). Discussion: Laparoscopic IRA may reduce risk of subsequent desmoid formation in patients with FAP.

Journal article

Worley G, Nordenvall C, Askari A, Pinkney T, Burns E, Akbar A, Olen O, Ekbom A, Bottai M, Myrelid P, Faiz Oet al., 2018, Restorative surgery after colectomy for ulcerative colitis in England and Sweden: observations from a comparison of nationwide cohorts, COLORECTAL DISEASE, Vol: 20, Pages: 804-812, ISSN: 1462-8910

Journal article

Chana P, Joy M, Casey N, Chang D, Burns EM, Arora S, Darzi AW, Faiz OD, Peden CJet al., 2017, Cohort analysis of outcomes in 69 490 emergency general surgical admissions across an international benchmarking collaborative, BMJ Open, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objective This study aims to use the Dr Foster Global Comparators Network (GC) database to examine differences in outcomes following high-risk emergency general surgery (EGS) admissions in participating centres across 3 countries and to determine whether hospital infrastructure factors can be linked to the delivery of high-quality care.Design A retrospective cohort analysis of high-risk EGS admissions using GC's international administrative data set.Setting 23 large hospitals in Australia, England and the USA.Methods Discharge data for a cohort of high-risk EGS patients were collated. Multilevel hierarchical logistic regression analysis was performed to examine geographical and structural differences between GC hospitals.Results 69 490 patients, admitted to 23 centres across Australia, England and the USA from 2007 to 2012, were identified. For all patients within this cohort, outcomes defined as: 7-day and 30-day inhospital mortality, readmission and length of stay appeared to be superior in US centres. A subgroup of 19 082 patients (27%) underwent emergency abdominal surgery. No geographical differences in mortality were seen at 7 days in this subgroup. 30-day mortality (OR=1.47, p<0.01) readmission (OR=1.42, p<0.01) and length of stay (OR=1.98, p<0.01) were worse in English units. Patient factors (age, pathology, comorbidity) were significantly associated with worse outcome as were structural factors, including low intensive care unit bed ratios, high volume and interhospital transfers. Having dedicated EGS teams cleared of elective commitments with formalised handovers was associated with shorter length of stay.Conclusions Key factors that influence outcomes were identified. For patients who underwent surgery, outcomes were similar at 7 days but not at 30 days. This may be attributable to better infrastructure and resource allocation towards EGS in the US and Australian centres.

Journal article

Chana P, Joy M, Casey N, Chang D, Burns EM, Arora S, Darzi AW, Faiz OD, Peden CJet al., 2017, Cohort analysis of outcomes in 69 490 emergency general surgical admissions across an international benchmarking collaborative, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Bouras G, Burns EM, Howell AM, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2017, Linked hospital and primary care database analysis of the impact of short-term complications on recurrence in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, HERNIA, Vol: 21, Pages: 191-198, ISSN: 1265-4906

Objective:To study the effects of short-term complications on recurrence following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using routine data.Background:Linked primary and secondary care databases can evaluate the quality of inguinal hernia surgery by quantifying short- and long-term outcome together.Methods:Longitudinal analysis of linked primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) and hospital administrative (Hospital Episodes Statistics) databases quantified 30-day complications (wound infection and bleeding) and surgery for recurrence after primary repair performed between 1st April 1997 and 31st March 2012.Results:Out of 41,545 primary inguinal hernia repairs, 10.3% (4296/41,545) were laparoscopic. Complications were less frequent following laparoscopic (1.8%, 78/4296) compared with open (3.5%, 1288/37,249) inguinal hernia repair (p < 0.05). Recurrence was more frequent following laparoscopic (3.5%, 84/2541) compared with open (1.2%, 366/31,859) repair (p < 0.05). Time to recurrence was shorter for laparoscopic (26.4 months SD 28.5) compared with open (46.7 months SD 37.6) repair (p < 0.05). Overall, complications were associated with recurrence (3.2%, 44/1366 with complications; 1.7%, 700/40,179 without complications; p < 0.05). Complications did not significantly increase the risk of recurrence in open hernia repair (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 0.97−2.30, p = 0.069). Complications following laparoscopic repair was significantly associated with increased risk of recurrence (OR = 7.86; 95% CI 3.46−17.85, p < 0.05).Conclusions:Complications recorded in linked routine data predicted recurrence following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Focus must, therefore, be placed on achieving good short-term outcome, which is likely to translate to better longer term results using the laparoscopic approach.

Journal article

Bouras G, Markar SR, Burns EM, Huddy JR, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Darzi A, Hanna GBet al., 2016, The psychological impact of symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection presenting in primary care: A national linked database study, European Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol: 43, Pages: 454-460, ISSN: 1532-2157

BackgroundThe objective was to evaluate incidence, risk factors and impact of postoperative symptoms following esophagogastric cancer resection in primary care.MethodsPatients undergoing esophagogastrectomy for cancer from 1998 to 2010 with linked records in Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episodes Statistics and Office of National Statistics databases were studied. The recording of codes for reflux, dysphagia, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, dumping, diarrhea, steatorrhea, appetite loss, weight loss, pain and fatigue were identified up to 12 months postoperatively. Psychiatric morbidity was also examined and its risk evaluated by logistic regression analysis.ResultsOverall, 58.6% (1029/1755) of patients were alive 2 years after surgery. Of these, 41.1% had recorded postoperative symptoms. Reflux, dysphagia, dyspepsia and pain were more frequent following esophagectomy compared with gastrectomy (p < 0.05). Complications (OR = 1.40 95%CI 1.00–1.95) and surgical procedure predicted postoperative symptoms (p < 0.05). When compared with partial gastrectomy, esophagectomy (OR = 2.03 95%CI 1.26–3.27), total gastrectomy (OR = 2.44 95%CI 1.57–3.79) and esophagogastrectomy (OR = 2.66 95%CI 1.85–2.86) were associated with postoperative symptoms (p < 0.05). The majority of patients with postoperative psychiatric morbidity had depression or anxiety (98%). Predictors of postoperative depression/anxiety included younger age (OR = 0.97 95%CI 0.96–0.99), complications (OR = 2.40 95%CI 1.51–3.83), psychiatric history (OR = 6.73 95%CI 4.25–10.64) and postoperative symptoms (OR = 1.78 95%CI 1.17–2.71).ConclusionsOver 40% of patients had symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection recorded in primary care, and were associated with an increase in postoperative depression and anxiety.

Journal article

Howell AM, Burns EM, Hull L, Mayer E, Sevdalis N, Darzi Aet al., 2016, Incident reporting: rare incidents may benefit from national problem solving, BMJ Quality & Safety, Vol: 26, ISSN: 2044-5423

Journal article

Cundy TP, Burns EM, Cohen P, Teare J, Darzi Aet al., 2016, Duplication cyst of the appendix: a proposal for modification of the Cave-Wallbridge classification., ANZ Journal of Surgery, Vol: 86, Pages: 731-732, ISSN: 1445-1433

Journal article

Bouras G, Markar SR, Burns EM, Mackenzie HA, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Hanna GB, Darzi Aet al., 2016, Linked Hospital and Primary Care Database Analysis of the Incidence and Impact of Psychiatric Morbidity Following Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery in England, Annals of Surgery, Vol: 264, Pages: 93-99, ISSN: 1528-1140

Journal article

Laudicella M, Walsh B, Burns E, Smith PCet al., 2016, Cost of care for cancer patients in England: evidence from population-based patient-level data, British Journal of Cancer, Vol: 114, Pages: 1286-1292, ISSN: 1532-1827

background: Health systems are facing the challenge of providing care to an increasing population of patients with cancer. However, evidence on costs is limited due to the lack of large longitudinal databases.methods: We matched cost of care data to population-based, patient-level data on cancer patients in England. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all patients age 18 and over with a diagnosis of colorectal (275 985 patients), breast (359 771), prostate (286 426) and lung cancer (283 940) in England between 2001 and 2010. Incidence costs, prevalence costs, and phase of care costs were estimated separately for patients age 18–64 and greater than or equal to65. Costs of care were compared by patients staging, before and after diagnosis, and with a comparison population without cancer.results: Incidence costs in the first year of diagnosis are noticeably higher in patients age 18–64 than age greater than or equal to65 across all examined cancers. A lower stage diagnosis is associated with larger cost savings for colorectal and breast cancer in both age groups. The additional costs of care because of the main four cancers amounts to £1.5 billion in 2010, namely 3.0% of the total cost of hospital care.conclusions: Population-based, patient-level data can be used to provide new evidence on the cost of cancer in England. Early diagnosis and cancer prevention have scope for achieving large cost savings for the health system.

Journal article

Burns EM, Pettengell C, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2016, Understanding The Strengths And Weaknesses Of Public Reporting Of Surgeon-Specific Outcome Data, HEALTH AFFAIRS, Vol: 35, Pages: 415-421, ISSN: 0278-2715

Journal article

Howell AR, Burns EM, Hull L, Sevdalis N, Mayer E, Darzi Aet al., 2016, International recommendations for national patient safety incident reporting systems: An expert Delphi consensus-building process, BMJ Quality and Safety, Vol: 26, Pages: 150-163, ISSN: 2044-5415

Background Patient safety incident reporting systems (PSRS) have been established for over a decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the role that they can and ought to play in quantifying healthcare-related harm and improving care.Objective To establish international, expert consensus on the purpose of PSRS regarding monitoring and learning from incidents and developing recommendations for their future role.Methods After a scoping review of the literature, semi-structured interviews with experts in PSRS were conducted. Based on these findings, a survey-based questionnaire was developed and subsequently completed by a larger expert panel. Using a Delphi approach, consensus was reached regarding the ideal role of PSRSs. Recommendations for best practice were devised.Results Forty recommendations emerged from the Delphi procedure on the role and use of PSRS. Experts agreed reporting system should not be used as an epidemiological tool to monitor the rate of harm over time or to appraise the relative safety of hospitals. They agreed reporting is a valuable mechanism for identifying organisational safety needs. The benefit of a national system was clear with respect to medication error, device failures, hospital-acquired infections and never events as these problems often require solutions at a national level. Experts recommended training for senior healthcare professionals in incident investigation. Consensus recommendation was for hospitals to take responsibility for creating safety solutions locally that could be shared nationally.Conclusions We obtained reasonable consensus among experts on aims and specifications of PSRS. This information can be used to reflect on existing and future PSRS, and their role within the wider patient safety landscape. The role of PSRS as instruments for learning needs to be elaborated and developed further internationally.

Journal article

Chana P, Burns EM, Arora S, Darzi AW, Faiz ODet al., 2016, A Systematic Review of the Impact of Dedicated Emergency Surgical Services on Patient Outcomes, Annals of Surgery, Vol: 263, Pages: 20-27, ISSN: 1528-1140

Journal article

Howell AR, burns EM, Bouras G, Athanasiou T, Donaldson LJ, Darzi Aet al., 2015, Can Patient Safety Incident Reports Be Used to Compare Hospital Safety? Results from a Quantitative Analysis of the English National Reporting and Learning System Data., PLOS One, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1932-6203

BackgroundThe National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) collects reports about patient safety incidents in England. Government regulators use NRLS data to assess the safety of hospitals.This study aims to examine whether annual hospital incident reporting rates can be used as a surrogate indicator of individual hospital safety. Secondly assesses which hospital characteristics are correlated with high incident reporting rates and whether a high reporting hospital is safer than those lower reporting hospitals. Finally, it assesses whichhealth-care professionals report more incidents of patient harm, which report more near miss incidents and what hospital factors encourage reporting. These findings may suggest methods for increasing the utility of reporting systems.MethodsThis study used a mix methods approach for assessing NRLS data. The data were investigated using Pareto analysis and regression models to establish which patients are most vulnerable to reported harm. Hospital factors were correlated with institutional reporting rates over one year to examine what factors influenced reporting. Staff survey findings regardinghospital safety culture were correlated with reported rates of incidents causing harm; no harm and death to understand what barriers influence error disclosure.Findings5,879,954 incident reports were collected from acute hospitals over the decade. 70.3%of incidents produced no harm to the patient and 0.9% were judged by the reporter to have caused severe harm or death. Obstetrics and Gynaecology reported the most no harmevents [OR 1.61(95%CI: 1.12 to 2.27), p<0.01] and pharmacy was the hospital location where most near-misses were captured [OR 3.03(95%CI: 2.04 to 4.55), p<0.01]. Clinicians were significantly more likely to report death than other staff [OR 3.04(95%CI: 2.43 to 3.80)p<0.01]. A higher ratio of clinicians to beds correlated with reduced rate of harm reported [RR = -1.78(95%Cl: -3.33 to -0.23), p = 0.03]. Litigation claims

Journal article

Laudicella M, Walsh B, Burns E, Smith PC, Irvine Let al., 2015, The economic burden of cancer in England: evidence from patient-level data analysis, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER CARE, Vol: 24, Pages: 12-12, ISSN: 0961-5423

Journal article

Bouras G, Burns EM, Howell A-M, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2015, LINKED HOSPITAL AND PRIMARY CARE DATABASE STUDY OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM AND ASSOCIATED MORTALITY FOLLOWING GENERAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES IN ENGLAND, 2nd Digestive-Disorders-Federation Conference, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A44-A45, ISSN: 0017-5749

Conference paper

Bouras G, Burns EM, Bottle A, Clarke J, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2015, COMBINED EFFECTS OF REOPERATION AND VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM IN GASTROINTESTINAL SURGERY: EVALUATION OF POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS USING LINKED HOSPITAL AND PRIMARY CARE DATA, 2nd Digestive-Disorders-Federation Conference, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A277-A278, ISSN: 0017-5749

Conference paper

Bouras G, Burns EM, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2015, LINKED PRIMARY CARE AND HOSPITAL DATABASE ANALYSIS OF TRENDS IN LAPAROSCOPY, SHORT-TERM COMPLICATIONS AND RECURRENCE FOLLOWING INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR IN ENGLAND, 2nd Digestive-Disorders-Federation Conference, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A185-A185, ISSN: 0017-5749

Conference paper

Burns EM, Ardakani A, Loh A, Glynne-Jones R, Elton Cet al., 2015, THE SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF ISOLATED PARAAORTIC LYMPH NODE RECURRENCE FOLLOWING COLORECTAL CANCER RESECTION: A CASE SERIES AND SYSTEMATIC REVIEW, 2nd Digestive-Disorders-Federation Conference, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A348-A348, ISSN: 0017-5749

Conference paper

Nachiappan S, Burns EM, Faiz O, 2015, Validity and Feasibility of the American College of Surgeons Colectomy Composite Outcome Quality Measure, ANNALS OF SURGERY, Vol: 261, Pages: E158-E158, ISSN: 0003-4932

Journal article

Bouras G, Burns EM, Howell A-M, Bagnall NM, Lee H, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2014, Systematic Review of the Impact of Surgical Harm on Quality of Life After General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, ANNALS OF SURGERY, Vol: 260, Pages: 975-983, ISSN: 0003-4932

Journal article

Chana P, Johnston MJ, Pullyblank AM, Burns EM, Faiz OD, Arora Set al., 2014, Identifying Organizational Failures in Emergency General Surgical Admissions in the United Kingdom: A Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis, Annual Clinical Congress of the American-College-of-Surgeons, Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, Pages: S92-S92, ISSN: 1072-7515

Conference paper

Currie A, Burns EM, Aylin P, Darzi A, Faiz OD, Ziprin Pet al., 2014, The impact of shortened postgraduate surgical training on colorectal cancer outcome, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COLORECTAL DISEASE, Vol: 29, Pages: 631-638, ISSN: 0179-1958

Journal article

Howell A-M, Panesar SS, Burns EM, Donaldson LJ, Darzi Aet al., 2014, Reducing the Burden of Surgical Harm A Systematic Review of the Interventions Used to Reduce Adverse Events in Surgery, ANNALS OF SURGERY, Vol: 259, Pages: 630-641, ISSN: 0003-4932

Journal article

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