Imperial College London

Dr Enrique Castro Sánchez

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Infectious Disease

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 2072e.castro-sanchez Website

 
 
//

Location

 

8.N17Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

152 results found

Vila-Candel R, Gonzalez-Chorda VM, Javier Soriano-Vidal F, Castro-Sanchez E, Rodriguez-Blanco N, Gomez-Segui A, Andreu-Pejo L, Martinez-Porcar C, Rodriguez Gonzalvez C, Torrent-Ramos P, Asensio-Tomas N, Herraiz-Soler Y, Escuriet R, Mena-Tudela Det al., 2022, Obstetric-neonatal care during birth and postpartum in symptomatic and asymptomatic women infected with SARS-CoV-2: a retrospective multicenter study, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1660-4601

This study analyses the obstetric–neonatal outcomes of women in labour with symptomatic and asymptomatic COVID-19. A retrospective, multicenter, observational study was carried out between 1 March 2020 and 28 February 2021 in eight public hospitals in the Valencian community (Spain). The chi-squared test compared the obstetric–neonatal outcomes and general care for symptomatic and asymptomatic women. In total, 11,883 births were assisted in participating centers, with 10.9 per 1000 maternities (n = 130) infected with SARS-CoV-2. The 20.8% were symptomatic and had more complications both upon admission (p = 0.042) and during puerperium (p = 0.042), as well as transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU). The percentage of admission to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) was greater among offspring of symptomatic women compared to infants born of asymptomatic women (p < 0.001). Compared with asymptomatic women, those with symptoms underwent less labour companionship (p = 0.028), less early skin-to-skin contact (p = 0.029) and greater mother–infant separation (p = 0.005). The overall maternal mortality rate was 0.8%. No vertical transmission was recorded. In conclusion, symptomatic infected women are at increased risk of lack of labour companionship, mother–infant separation, and admission to the ICU, as well as to have preterm births and for NICU admissions

Journal article

Valero-Chilleron MJ, Mena-Tudela D, Cervera-Gasch A, Gonzalez-Chorda VM, Soriano-Vidal FJ, Quesada JA, Castro-Sanchez E, Vila-Candel Ret al., 2022, Influence of health literacy on maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months postpartum: a multicentre study, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1660-4601

Background: International organizations recommend initiating breastfeeding within the first hour of life and maintaining exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months. However, worldwide rates of exclusive breastfeeding for 6-month-old infants is far from meeting the goal proposed by the World Health Organization, which is to reach a minimum of 50% of infants. Education is one of the factors affecting the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding, and incidentally, it is also related to lower health literacy. This study explored the influence of health literacy on maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months postpartum. Methods: A longitudinal multicenter study with 343 women were recruited between January 2019 and January 2020. The first questionnaire was held during the puerperium (24–48 h) with mothers practicing exclusive breastfeeding, with whom 6-month postpartum breastfeeding follow-up was performed. Socio-demographic, clinical and obstetric variables were collected. Breastfeeding efficiency was assessed using the LATCH breastfeeding assessment tool. The health literacy level was evaluated by the Newest Vital Sign screening tool. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to detect protective factors for early exclusive breastfeeding cessation. Results: One third of the women continued exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months postpartum. Approximately half the participants had a low or inadequate health literacy level. An adequate health literacy level, a high LATCH breastfeeding assessment tool score (>9 points) and being married were the protective factors against exclusive breastfeeding cessation at 6 months postpartum. Conclusion: Health literacy levels are closely related to maintaining exclusive breastfeeding and act as a protective factor against early cessation. A specific instrument is needed to measure the lack of “literacy in breastfeeding”, in order to verify the relationship between health literacy and maintenance

Journal article

Drobniewski F, Kusuma D, Broda A, Castro-Sánchez E, Ahmad Ret al., 2022, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in diverse groups in the UK — is the driver economic or cultural in student populations, Vaccines, Vol: 10, Pages: 501-501, ISSN: 2076-393X

Studies have identified a greater reluctance for members of the Black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities to be vaccinated against COVID-19 despite a higher probability of greater harm from COVID-19. We conducted an anonymised questionnaire-based study of students (recruiting primarily before first reports of embolic events) at two London universities to identify whether economic or educational levels were primarily responsible for this reluctance: a postgraduate core group (PGCC) n = 860, and a pilot study of undergraduate medical and nursing students (n = 103). Asian and Black students were 2.0 and 3.2 times (PGCC) less likely to accept the COVID vaccine than White British students. Similar findings were noted in the pilot study students. As the students were studying for Master’s or PhD degrees and voluntarily paying high fees, educational and economic reasons were unlikely to be the underlying cause, and wider cultural reservations were more likely. Politicians exerted a strong negative influence, suggesting that campaigns should omit politicians.

Journal article

Courtenay M, Castro-Sanchez E, Gallagher R, Gould D, Hawker Cet al., 2022, Delivery of antimicrobial stewardship competencies in UK pre-registration nurse education programmes: a national cross-sectional survey, JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL INFECTION, Vol: 121, Pages: 39-48, ISSN: 0195-6701

Journal article

Cervera-Gasch A, Mena-Tudela D, Castro-Sanchez E, Santillan-Garcia A, Andreu-Pejo L, Manuel Gonzalez-Chorda Vet al., 2022, Necessary political competences for nurses from the perception of the student body: Cross-sectional study in Spain, NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, Vol: 109, ISSN: 0260-6917

Journal article

Nampoothiri V, Bonaconsa C, Bonaconsa S, Mbamalu O, Nambatya W, Ahabwe Babigumira P, Ahmad R, Castro-Sanchez E, Broom A, Szymczak J, Zingg W, Gilchrist M, Holmes A, Mendelson M, Singh S, McLeod M, Charani Eet al., 2022, What does antimicrobial stewardship look like where you are? Global narratives from participants in a massive open online course, JAC-Antimicrobial Resistance, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2632-1823

Background:Whilst antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) is being implemented globally, contextual differences exist. We describe how the use of a massive open online course (MOOC) platform provided an opportunity to gather diverse narratives on AMS from around the world.Methods:A free 3 week MOOC titled ‘Tackling antimicrobial resistance: a social science approach’ was launched in November 2019. Learners were asked specific questions about their experiences of AMS via 38 optional free-text prompts dispersed throughout the modules. Content analysis was used to identify key emerging themes from the learners’ responses in the first three runs of the MOOC.Results:Between November 2019 and July 2020, 1464 learners enrolled from 114 countries. Overall, 199 individual learners provided a total of 1097 responses to the prompts. The diverse perspectives describe unique challenges present in different contexts including ill-defined roles for pharmacists and nurses in AMS; inadequate governance and policy inconsistencies in surveillance for antibiotic consumption and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in some countries; lack of ownership of antibiotic decision-making and buy-in from different clinical specialties; and human resource and technological constraints. Patients’ knowledge, experiences and perspectives were recognized as a valuable source of information that should be incorporated in AMS initiatives to overcome cultural barriers to the judicious use of antibiotics.Conclusions:Analysis of learner comments and reflections identified a range of enablers and barriers to AMS implementation across different healthcare economies. Common challenges to AMS implementation included the role of non-physician healthcare workers, resource limitations, gaps in knowledge of AMR, and patient engagement and involvement in AMS.

Journal article

Charani E, Holmes A, Bonaconsa C, Mbamalu O, Mendelson M, Surendran S, Singh S, Nampoothiri V, Boutall A, Tarrant C, Dhar P, Pennel T, Leather A, Hampton Met al., 2021, Investigating infection management and antimicrobial stewardship in surgery: a qualitative study from India and South Africa, Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Vol: 27, Pages: 1455-1464, ISSN: 1198-743X

Objectives To investigate the drivers for infection management and antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) across high infection risk surgical pathways. Methods An qualitative study, ethnographic observation of clinical practices, patient case studies, and face-to-face interviews with healthcare professionals (HCP) and patients was conducted across cardiovascular and thoracic and gastrointestinal surgical pathways in South Africa (SA) and India. Aided by Nvivo 11 software, data were coded and analysed until saturation was reached. The multiple modes of enquiry enabled cross-validation and triangulation of findings.Results Between July 2018–August 2019 data were gathered from 190 hours of non-participant observations (138 India, 72 SA); interviews with HCPs (44 India, 61 SA); patients (6 India, 8 SA), and, case studies (4 India, 2 SA). Across the surgical pathway, multiple barriers impede effective infection management and AMS. The existing, implicit roles of HCPs (including nurses, and senior surgeons) are overlooked as interventions target junior doctors, bypassing the opportunity for integrating infection-related care across the surgical team. Critically, the ownership of decisions remains with the operating surgeons and entrenched hierarchies restrict the inclusion of other HCPs in decision-making. The structural foundations to enable staff to change their behaviours and participate in infection-related surgical care is lacking.ConclusionsIdentifying the implicit existing HCPs roles in infection management is critical and will facilitate the development of effective and transparent processes across the surgical team for optimised care. Applying a framework approach that includes nurse leadership, empowering pharmacists and engaging surgical leads is essential for integrated AMS and infection-related care. Keywords: antibiotic prescribing, infection control, ethnography, low- and middle-income country, surgery

Journal article

Blanco-Mavillard I, Ernest de Pedro-Gomez J, Angel Rodriguez-Calero M, Bennasar-Veny M, Parra-Garcia G, Fernandez-Fernandez I, Bujalance-Hoyos J, Belen Moya-Suarez A, Luis Cobo-Sanchez J, Ferrer-Cruz F, Castro-Sanchez Eet al., 2021, Multimodal intervention for preventing peripheral intravenous catheter failure in adults (PREBACP) : a multicentre, cluster-randomised, controlled trial, LANCET HAEMATOLOGY, Vol: 8, Pages: E637-E647, ISSN: 2352-3026

Journal article

Blanco-Mavillard I, Castro-Sánchez E, Parra-García G, Rodríguez-Calero MÁ, Bennasar-Veny M, Fernández-Fernández I, Lorente-Neches H, De Pedro-Gómez JEet al., 2021, What Fuels Suboptimal Care of Peripheral Intravenous Catheter-related Infections in Hospitals? – a Qualitative Study of Decision-making Among Spanish Nurses

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Background: Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVC) are commonly used in hospital worldwide. However, PIVC are not exempt from complications. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) increase morbidity and mortality rates, and costs for the healthcare organization. PIVC care is shaped by the complex mix of professional and organizational culture, such as knowledge gaps, low perception of impact of PIVCs on patient safety, or lack of hospital guidelines.Aim: To explore determinants of decision-making about the prevention of PIVC-BSI among nurses in Spanish hospitals.Methods: We conducted a descriptive qualitative study with semi-structured interviews in three public hospitals, the Balearic Islands Health Care Service in Spain. We considered hospital ward nurses working routinely with inpatients at any of the three hospitals for enrolment in the study. We approached relevant informants to identify suitable participants who recruited other participants through a ‘snowball’ technique. Fourteen inpatient nurses from the hospital took part in this study between September and November 2018. We employed several triangulation strategies to underpin the methodological rigour of our analysis and conducted the member checking, showing the information and codes applied in the recording of the interviews to identify the coherence and any discrepancies of the discourse by participants. We used the COREQ checklist for this study.Findings: We identified four major themes in the analysis related to determinants of care: The fog of decision-making in PIVC; The taskification of PIVC care; PIVC care is accepted to be suboptimal, yet irrelevant; and PIVC care gaps may reflect behavioural shortcomings, yet solutions proposed to involve education and training. Conclusion: The clinical management of PIVCs appear ambiguous, unclear, and fragmented, with no clear professional responsibility and no nurse lead

Journal article

Charani E, McKee M, Ahmad R, Balasegaram M, Bonaconsa C, Merrett GB, Busse R, Carter V, Castro-Sanchez E, Franklin BD, Georgiou P, Hill-Cawthorne K, Hope W, Imanaka Y, Kambugu A, Leather AJM, Mbamalu O, McLeod M, Mendelson M, Mpundu M, Rawson TM, Ricciardi W, Rodriguez-Manzano J, Singh S, Tsioutis C, Uchea C, Zhu N, Holmes AHet al., 2021, Optimising antimicrobial use in humans-review of current evidence and an interdisciplinary consensus on key priorities for research, The Lancet Regional Health - Europe, Vol: 7, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2666-7762

Addressing the silent pandemic of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a focus of the 2021 G7 meeting. A major driver of AMR and poor clinical outcomes is suboptimal antimicrobial use. Current research in AMR is inequitably focused on new drug development. To achieve antimicrobial security we need to balance AMR research efforts between development of new agents and strategies to preserve the efficacy and maximise effectiveness of existing agents.Combining a review of current evidence and multistage engagement with diverse international stakeholders (including those in healthcare, public health, research, patient advocacy and policy) we identified research priorities for optimising antimicrobial use in humans across four broad themes: policy and strategic planning; medicines management and prescribing systems; technology to optimise prescribing; and context, culture and behaviours. Sustainable progress depends on: developing economic and contextually appropriate interventions; facilitating better use of data and prescribing systems across healthcare settings; supporting appropriate and scalable technological innovation. Implementing this strategy for AMR research on the optimisation of antimicrobial use in humans could contribute to equitable global health security.

Journal article

Cabellos-Garcia AC, Martinez-Sabater A, Diaz-Herrera MA, Gea-Caballero V, Castro-Sanchez Eet al., 2021, Health literacy of patients on oral anticoagulation treatment-individual and social determinants and effect on health and treatment outcomes, BMC Public Health, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1471-2458

BackgroundAssessment health literacy in people with cardiovascular health problems would facilitate the development of appropriate health strategies for the care and reduction of complications associated with oral anticoagulation therapy. Aim: To evaluate the relationship between health literacy and health and treatment outcomes (concordance with oral anticoagulants, Normalized Ratio control and occurrence of complications) in patients with cardiovascular pathology.MethodsObservational, analytic and cross-sectional study carried out on 252 patients with cardiovascular pathology (atrial fibrillation, flutter or valve prosthesis), aged 50–85 years, accessing primary care services in Valencia (Spain) in 2018–2019. Variables referring to anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists (years of treatment, adequate control, polypharmacy and occurrence of complications, among others) and health literacy (Health Literacy Questionnaire) were analysed.ResultsAll dimensions of health literacy were significantly related to the level of education (p < 0.02), social class (p < 0.02), an adequate control of acenocoumarol (p < 0.001), frequentation of health services (p < 0.001), information by patients to health professionals about anticoagulant treatment (p < 0.03), emergency care visits (p < 0.001) and unscheduled hospital admissions (p < 0.001).ConclusionHealth literacy has a relevant influence on the adequate self-management of anticoagulation treatment and the frequency of complications. The different dimensions that comprise health literacy play an important role, but the “social health support” dimension seems to be essential for such optimal self-management.

Journal article

Zhu J, Ferlie E, Castro-Sánchez E, Birgand G, Holmes A, Atun R, Kieltyka H, Ahmad Ret al., 2021, Macro level factors influencing strategic responses to emergent pandemics: a scoping review, Journal of Global Health, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 2047-2978

Background: Strategic planning is critical for successful pandemic management. This study aimed to identify and review the scope and analytic depth of situation analyses conducted to understand their utility, and capture the documented macro-level factors impacting4pandemic management. Methods: To synthesise this disparate body of literature, we adopted a two-step search and 6review process. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify all studies since 2000, that have 1) employed a situation analysis;and2) examined contextual factors influencing pandemic management. The included studies are analysed using a seven-domain systems approach rom the discipline of strategic management. Findings: Nineteen studies were included in the final review ranging from single country (6) to regional, multi-country studies (13). Fourteen studies had a single disease focus, with 5 studies evaluating responses to one or more of COVID-19, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS),Influenza A (H1N1),Ebola virus disease, and Zika virus disease pandemics. Six studies examined a single domain from political, economic, sociological, technological, ecological or wider industry(PESTELI), 5 studies examined two to four domains, and8studies examined five or more domains. Methods employed were predominantly literature reviews. The recommendations focus predominantly on addressing inhibitors in the sociological and technological domains with few recommendations articulated in the political domain. Overall, the legislative domain is least represented. Conclusions: Ex-post analysis using the seven-domain strategic management framework provides further opportunities for a planned systematic response to pandemics which remains critical as the current COVID-19 pandemic evolves.

Journal article

Ahmad R, Atun R, Birgand G, Castro-Sánchez E, Charani E, Ferlie E, Hussain I, Kambugu A, Labarca J, Levy Hara G, Mckee M, Mendelson M, Singh S, Varma J, Zhu J, Zingg W, Holmes Aet al., 2021, Macro level influences on strategic responses to the COVID-19 pandemic – an international survey and tool for national assessments, Journal of Global Health, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2047-2978

Background Variation in the approaches taken to contain the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic at country level has been shaped by economic and political considerations, technical capacity, and assumptions about public behaviours. To address the limited application of learning from previous pandemics, this study aimed to analyse perceived facilitators and inhibitors during the pandemic and to inform the development of an assessment tool for pandemic response planning.Methods A cross-sectional electronic survey of health and non-healthcare professionals (5 May - 5 June 2020) in six languages, with respondents recruited via email, social media and website posting. Participants were asked to score inhibitors (-10 to 0) or facilitators (0 to +10) impacting country response to COVID-19 from the following domains – Political, Economic, Sociological, Technological, Ecological, Legislative, and wider Industry (the PESTELI framework). Participants were then asked to explain their responses using free text. Descriptive and thematic analysis was followed by triangulation with the literature and expert validation to develop the assessment tool, which was then compared with four existing pandemic planning frameworks.Results 928 respondents from 66 countries (57% healthcare professionals) participated. Political and economic influences were consistently perceived as powerful negative forces and technology as a facilitator across high- and low-income countries. The 103-item tool developed for guiding rapid situational assessment for pandemic planning is comprehensive when compared to existing tools and highlights the interconnectedness of the 7 domains. Conclusions The tool developed and proposed addresses the problems associated with decision making in disciplinary silos and offers a means to refine future use of epidemic modelling.

Journal article

Ashiru-Oredope D, Hopkins S, Vasandani S, Umoh E, Oloyede O, Nilsson A, Kinsman J, Elsert L, Monnet DL, ECDCAntibioticSurvey Project Advisory Groupet al., 2021, Healthcare workers' knowledge, attitudes and behaviours with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance across 30 EU/EEA countries in 2019., Euro Surveillance, Vol: 26, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 1560-7917

BackgroundWhile several studies have assessed knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of the public, physicians and medical students in a number of EU/EEA countries with respect to antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, there is a paucity of literature for other healthcare workers. This survey aimed to fill this gap.MethodsA 43-item online questionnaire was developed, validated and pilot-tested through a modified Delphi consensus process involving 87 Project Advisory Group (PAG) members, including national representatives and members of European health professional groups. The survey was distributed by the PAG and via social media to healthcare workers in 30 EU/EEA countries.ResultsRespondents (n = 18,365) from 30 EU/EEA countries participated. Knowledge of antibiotics and antibiotic use was higher (97%) than knowledge of development and spread of antibiotic resistance (75%). Sixty percent of respondents stated they had received information on avoiding unnecessary prescribing, administering or dispensing of antibiotics. Among respondents who prescribed, administered or dispensed antibiotics, 55% had provided advice on prudent antibiotic use or management of infections to patients, but only 17% had given resources (leaflets or pamphlets). For community and hospital prescribers, fear of patient deterioration or complications was the most frequent reason (43%) for prescribing antibiotics that were considered unnecessary. Community prescribers were almost twice as likely as hospital prescribers to prescribe antibiotics due to time constraints or to maintain patient relationships.ConclusionIt is important to move from raising awareness about prudent antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance among healthcare workers to designing antimicrobial stewardship interventions aimed at changing relevant behaviours.

Journal article

Ahmad R, Atun R, Birgand G, Castro-Sánchez E, Charani E, Ferlie E, Hussain I, Kambugu A, Labarca J, Levy Hara G, McKee M, Mendelson M, Singh S, Varma J, Zhu N, Zingg W, Holmes A, Group COMPASSCAMOPTSASet al., 2021, Macro Level Influences on Strategic Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Tool for National Assessments, Journal of Global Health, ISSN: 2047-2978

Journal article

Castro-Sanchez E, Russell AM, Dolman L, Wells Met al., 2021, What place does nurse-led research have in the COVID-19 pandemic?, INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Vol: 68, Pages: 214-218, ISSN: 0020-8132

Journal article

Martischang R, Tartari E, Kilpatrick C, Mackenzie G, Carter V, Castro-Sanchez E, Marquez-Villarreal H, Otter JA, Perencevich E, Silber D, Storr J, Tetro J, Voss A, Pittet Det al., 2021, Enhancing engagement beyond the conference walls: analysis of Twitter use at #ICPIC2019 infection prevention and control conference, Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2047-2994

BackgroundSocial media may provide a tool, when coupled with a patient-included™ conference, to enhance the engagement among the general public. We describe authors and potential readers of Twitter content surrounding a patient-included™ scientific congress, the International Consortium for Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC) 2019.MethodsRetrospective observational analysis of Twitter users posting with the #ICPIC2019 hashtag during the conference. Tweet authors, overall followers, and active followers were categorized according to their Twitter biographies using unsupervised learning. Diversity of professional backgrounds of Tweet authors and their followers was explored. Network analysis explored connectedness between the reach of authors.ResultsIn total, 1264 participants attended ICPIC 2019, of which 28 were patients. From September 7 to 16, 2019, we were able to categorize 235′620 (41%) followers linked to 474 (76%) authors. Among authors and followers, respectively 34% and 14% were healthcare workers, 11% and 15% were from industry representatives, 8% and 7% were academic researchers. On average, 23% (range 9–39%) followers belonged to the same categories as authors. Among all followers categorized, only 582/235 620 (0.25%) interacted with original messages, including healthcare workers (37%), global and public health (12%), academic research (11%) and those from industry (11%). Though the similarity between Tweet authors and followers was supported by network analysis, we also observed that non-healthcare workers (including patients) appeared to have more diverse followers.ConclusionsWe observed the participation of numerous Tweet authors and followers from diverse professional backgrounds potentially supporting the benefit of including patients in conferences to reach a more general, non-specialized public.

Journal article

Castro-Sanchez E, Alexander CM, Atchison C, Patel D, Leung W, Calamita ME, Garcia DM, Cimpeanu C, Mumbwatasai JM, Ramid D, Doherty K, Grewal HS, Otter JA, Wells EMet al., 2020, Evaluation of a personal protective equipment (PPE) support programme ('PPE Helpers') for staff during the COVID-19 pandemic in London, Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol: 109, Pages: 68-7, ISSN: 0195-6701

BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic has presented one of the biggest challenges to healthcare providers worldwide. The appropriate use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) has been essential to ensuring staff and patient safety. To counteract sub-optimal PPE practice, a PPE helper programme was developed at a large London hospital group. Based on a behaviour change model of Capability, Opportunity and Motivation (COM-B), the programme provided PPE support, advice and education to ward staff.AimEvaluation of the PPE Helper Programme.MethodsClinical and non-clinical ward staff completed a questionnaire informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework and COM-B. The questionnaire was available in paper and electronic versions. Quantitative responses were analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics, free-text responses were analysed thematically.FindingsOver a six-week period, PPE helpers made 268 ward visits. Overall, 261 questionnaires were available for analysis. Across the Trust, 68% of respondents reported having had contact with a PPE helper. Staff who had encountered a PPE helper responded significantly more positively to a range of statements about using PPE than those who had not. Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) staff were significantly more anxious in relation to the adequacy of PPE. Non-clinical and redeployed staff (e.g. domestic staff) were most positive about the impact of PPE helpers. Free-text comments showed that staff found the programme supportive and would have liked it earlier in the pandemic.ConclusionA PPE Helper programme is a feasible and beneficial intervention for providing support, advice and education to ward staff during infectious disease outbreaks.

Journal article

Tsioutis C, Birgand G, Bathoorn E, Deptula A, ten Horn L, Castro-Sánchez E, Săndulescu O, Widmer AF, Tsakris A, Pieve G, Tacconelli E, Mutters NTet al., 2020, Education and training programmes for infection prevention and control professionals: mapping the current opportunities and local needs in European countries, Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2047-2994

BackgroundStudies have repeatedly highlighted the need for homogenisation of training content and opportunities in infection prevention and control (IPC) across European countries.ObjectivesTo map current training opportunities for IPC professionals, define local needs and highlight differences, across 11 European countries (Cyprus, France, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, Switzerland).SourcesFrom July 2018 to February 2019, IPC experts directly involved in IPC training and education in their countries and/or internationally were invited to complete a prespecified set of questions in order to provide a detailed description of IPC training opportunities and needs in their country.ConclusionsIPC training among nurses and doctors varies greatly across countries, with differences in content and type of training (e.g., standardised curriculum, educational programme, clinical experience) duration, as well as in assessment and recognition/accreditation. The observed heterogeneity in IPC training between European countries can be eliminated through establishment of interdisciplinary region-wide training programmes, with common learning objectives, shared know-how and supported by national and international professional bodies.

Journal article

Naylor N, Yamashita K, Iwami M, Kunisawa S, Mizuno S, Castro-Sánchez E, Imanaka Y, Ahmad R, Holmes Aet al., 2020, Code-sharing in cost-of-illness calculations: an application to antibiotic-resistant bloodstream infections, Frontiers in Public Health, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2296-2565

Background: More data-driven evidence is needed on the cost of antibiotic resistance. Both Japan and England have large surveillance and administrative datasets. Code sharing of costing models enables reduced duplication of effort in research.Objective: To estimate the burden of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSIs) in Japan, utilizing code that was written to estimate the hospital burden of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli BSIs in England. Additionally, the process in which the code-sharing and application was performed is detailed, to aid future such use of code-sharing in health economics.Methods: National administrative data sources were linked with voluntary surveillance data within the Japan case study. R software code, which created multistate models to estimate the excess length of stay associated with different exposures of interest, was adapted from previous use and run on this dataset. Unit costs were applied to estimate healthcare system burden in 2017 international dollars (I$).Results: Clear supporting documentation alongside open-access code, licensing, and formal communication channels, helped the re-application of costing code from the English setting within the Japanese setting. From the Japanese healthcare system perspective, it was estimated that there was an excess cost of I$6,392 per S. aureus BSI, whilst oxacillin resistance was associated with an additional I$8,155.Conclusions: S. aureus resistance profiles other than methicillin may substantially impact hospital costs. The sharing of costing models within the field of antibiotic resistance is a feasible way to increase burden evidence efficiently, allowing for decision makers (with appropriate data available) to gain rapid cost-of-illness estimates.

Journal article

Vila-Candel R, Soriano-Vidal FJ, Mena-Tudela D, Quesada JA, Castro-Sanchez Eet al., 2020, Health literacy of pregnant women and duration of breastfeeding maintenance: A feasibility study, JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Vol: 77, Pages: 703-714, ISSN: 0309-2402

Journal article

Charani E, Singh S, Mendelson M, Veepanattu P, Nampoothiri V, Edathadatil F, Surendran S, Bonaconsa C, Mbamalu O, Ahuja S, Sevdalis N, Tarrant C, Birgand G, Castro-SAnchez E, Ahmad R, Holmes Aet al., 2020, Building resilient and responsive research collaborations to tackle antimicrobial resistance – lessons learnt from India, South Africa and UK, International Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol: 100, Pages: 278-282, ISSN: 1201-9712

Research, collaboration and knowledge exchange are critical to global efforts to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Different healthcare economies are faced with different challenges in implementing effective strategies to address AMR. Building effective capacity for research to inform AMR related strategies and policies AMR is recognised as an important contributor to success. Interdisciplinary, inter-sector, as well as inter-country collaboration is needed to span AMR efforts from the global to local. Developing reciprocal, long-term, partnerships between collaborators in high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) needs to be built on principles of capacity building. Using case-studies spanning local to international research collaborations to co-design, implement and evaluate strategies to tackle AMR, we evaluate and build upon the ESSENCE criteria for capacity building in LMICs. The first case-study describes the local co-design and implementation of antimicrobial stewardship in the state of Kerala in India. The second case-study describes an international research collaboration investigating AMR across surgical pathways in India, UK and South Africa. We describe the steps undertaken to develop robust, agile, and flexible antimicrobial stewardship research and implementation teams. Notably, investing in capacity building ensured that the programmes described in these case-studies were sustained through the current severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus pandemic. Describing the strategies adopted by a local and an international collaboration to tackle AMR, we provide a model for capacity building in LMICs that can support sustainable and agile antimicrobial stewardship programmes.

Journal article

Cortes R, Bennasar-Veny M, Castro-Sanchez E, Fresneda S, de Pedro-Gomez J, Yanez Aet al., 2020, Nutrition screening tools for risk of malnutrition among hospitalized patients A protocol for systematic review and meta analysis, MEDICINE, Vol: 99, ISSN: 0025-7974

Journal article

Blanco-Mavillard I, Parra-Garcia G, Fernandez-Fernandez I, Rodriguez-Calero MA, Personat-Labrador C, Castro-Sanchez Eet al., 2020, Care of peripheral intravenous catheters in three hospitals in Spain: Mapping clinical outcomes and implementation of clinical practice guidelines, PLOS ONE, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Pouwels KB, Roope LSJ, Buchanan J, Morrell L, Tonkin-Crine S, Peters M, Jones LF, Castro-Sanchez E, Crook DW, Peto T, Butler CC, Robotham JV, Walker AS, Wordsworth Set al., 2020, Awareness of Appropriate Antibiotic Use in Primary Care for Influenza-Like Illness: Evidence of Improvement from UK Population-Based Surveys, ANTIBIOTICS-BASEL, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2079-6382

Journal article

Vila-Candel R, Martinez-Arnau FM, de la Camara-de las Heras JM, Castro-Sanchez E, Perez-Ros Pet al., 2020, Interventions to Improve Health among Reproductive-Age Women of Low Health Literacy: A Systematic Review, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 17

Journal article

Santillan-Garcia A, Zaforteza-Lallemand C, Castro-Sanchez E, 2020, Nurses as political knowledge brokers, opportunities for growth in the Spanish context, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, Vol: 110, ISSN: 0020-7489

Journal article

Courtenay M, Burnett E, Castro-Sanchez E, Du Toit B, Figueiredo RM, Gallagher R, Gotterson F, Kennedy H, Manias E, McEwen J, Ness V, Olans R, Padoveze MCet al., 2020, Preparing nurses for COVID-19 response efforts through involvement in antimicrobial stewardship programmes, JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL INFECTION, Vol: 106, Pages: 176-178, ISSN: 0195-6701

Journal article

Castro-Sanchez E, Mena-Tudela D, Soriano-Vidal FJ, Vila-Candel Ret al., 2020, Health literacy: A crucial determinant of vaccination decision-making, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Vol: 97, Pages: 202-203, ISSN: 1201-9712

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00737357&limit=30&person=true