Imperial College London

DrElenaChekmeneva

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

Research Associate - Structural Elucidation
 
 
 
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e.chekmeneva

 
 
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Institute of Reproductive and Developmental BiologyHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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41 results found

Martinez-Gili L, Mullish BH, Correia G, Chekmeneva E, Homeffer-Van Der Sluis V, McClure EL, Marchesi J, Gerber G, Bry L, Allegretti JRet al., 2021, A DISTINCTIVE SIGNATURE OF FECAL BILE ACIDS AND OTHER NOVEL METABOLITES ACCOMPANYING RECURRENCE AFTER PRIMARY CLOSTRIDIOIDES DIFFICILE INFECTION, Publisher: W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, Pages: S368-S368, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Takis PG, Jiménez B, Al-Saffar NMS, Harvey N, Chekmeneva E, Misra S, Lewis MRet al., 2021, A computationally lightweight algorithm for deriving reliable metabolite panel measurements from 1D 1H NMR., Analytical Chemistry, Vol: 93, Pages: 4995-5000, ISSN: 0003-2700

Small Molecule Enhancement SpectroscopY (SMolESY) was employed to develop a unique and fully automated computational solution for the assignment and integration of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from metabolites in challenging matrices containing macromolecules (herein blood products). Sensitive and reliable quantitation is provided by instant signal deconvolution and straightforward integration bolstered by spectral resolution enhancement and macromolecular signal suppression. The approach is highly efficient, requiring only standard one-dimensional 1H NMR spectra and avoiding the need for sample preprocessing, complex deconvolution, and spectral baseline fitting. The performance of the algorithm, developed using >4000 NMR serum and plasma spectra, was evaluated using an additional >8800 spectra, yielding an assignment accuracy greater than 99.5% for all 22 metabolites targeted. Further validation of its quantitation capabilities illustrated a reliable performance among challenging phenotypes. The simplicity and complete automation of the approach support the application of NMR-based metabolite panel measurements in clinical and population screening applications.

Journal article

Sands CJ, Gómez-Romero M, Correia G, Chekmeneva E, Camuzeaux S, Izzi-Engbeaya C, Dhillo WS, Takats Z, Lewis MRet al., 2021, Representing the metabolome with high fidelity: range and response as quality control factors in LC-MS-based global profiling., Analytical Chemistry, Vol: 93, Pages: 1924-1933, ISSN: 0003-2700

Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a powerful and widely used technique for measuring the abundance of chemical species in living systems. Its sensitivity, analytical specificity, and direct applicability to biofluids and tissue extracts impart great promise for the discovery and mechanistic characterization of biomarker panels for disease detection, health monitoring, patient stratification, and treatment personalization. Global metabolic profiling applications yield complex data sets consisting of multiple feature measurements for each chemical species observed. While this multiplicity can be useful in deriving enhanced analytical specificity and chemical identities from LC-MS data, data set inflation and quantitative imprecision among related features is problematic for statistical analyses and interpretation. This Perspective provides a critical evaluation of global profiling data fidelity with respect to measurement linearity and the quantitative response variation observed among components of the spectra. These elements of data quality are widely overlooked in untargeted metabolomics yet essential for the generation of data that accurately reflect the metabolome. Advanced feature filtering informed by linear range estimation and analyte response factor assessment is advocated as an attainable means of controlling LC-MS data quality in global profiling studies and exemplified herein at both the feature and data set level.

Journal article

Kurbatova N, Garg M, Whiley L, Chekmeneva E, Jimenez B, Gomez-Romero M, Pearce J, Kimhofer T, D'Hondt E, Soininen H, Kloszewska I, Mecocci P, Tsolaki M, Vellas B, Aarsland D, Nevado-Holgado A, Liu B, Snowden S, Proitsi P, Ashton NJ, Hye A, Legido-Quigley C, Lewis MR, Nicholson JK, Holmes E, Brazma A, Lovestone Set al., 2020, Urinary metabolic phenotyping for Alzheimer's disease, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

Finding early disease markers using non-invasive and widely available methods is essential to develop a successful therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease. Few studies to date have examined urine, the most readily available biofluid. Here we report the largest study to date using comprehensive metabolic phenotyping platforms (NMR spectroscopy and UHPLC-MS) to probe the urinary metabolome in-depth in people with Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Feature reduction was performed using metabolomic Quantitative Trait Loci, resulting in the list of metabolites associated with the genetic variants. This approach helps accuracy in identification of disease states and provides a route to a plausible mechanistic link to pathological processes. Using these mQTLs we built a Random Forests model, which not only correctly discriminates between people with Alzheimer’s Disease and age-matched controls, but also between individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment who were later diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and those who were not. Further annotation of top-ranking metabolic features nominated by the trained model revealed the involvement of cholesterol-derived metabolites and small-molecules that were linked to Alzheimer’s pathology in previous studies.

Journal article

Lau CH, Taylor-Bateman V, Vorkas PA, Gomes Da Graca G, Vu T-H, Hou L, Chekmeneva E, Ebbels T, Chan Q, Van Horn L, Holmes Eet al., 2020, Metabolic signatures of gestational weight gain and postpartum weight loss in a lifestyle intervention study of overweight and obese women, Metabolites, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2218-1989

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity amongst women of reproductive age are increasingly common in developed economies and are shown to adversely affect birth outcomes and both childhood and adulthood health risks in the offspring. Metabolic profiling in conditions of overweight and obesity in pregnancy could potentially be applied to elucidate the molecular basis of the adverse effects of gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight loss (WL) on future risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other chronic diseases. METHODS: Biofluid samples were collected from 114 ethnically diverse pregnant women with body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 40 kg/m2 from Chicago (US), as part of a randomized lifestyle intervention trial (Maternal Offspring Metabolics: Family Intervention Trial; NCT01631747). At 15 weeks, 35 weeks of gestation, and at 1 year postpartum, the blood plasma lipidome and metabolic profile of urine samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) respectively. RESULTS: Urinary 4-deoxyerythronic acid and 4-deoxythreonic acid were found to be positively correlated to BMI. Seventeen plasma lipids were found to be associated with GWG and 16 lipids were found to be associated with WL, which included phosphatidylinositols (PI), phosphatidylcholines (PC), lysophospholipids (lyso-), sphingomyelins (SM) and ether phosphatidylcholine (PC-O). Three phospholipids found to be positively associated with GWG all contained palmitate side-chains, and amongst the 14 lipids that were negatively associated with GWG, seven were PC-O. Six of eight lipids found to be negatively associated with WL contained an 18:2 fatty acid side-chain. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal obesity was associated with characteristic urine and plasma metabolic phenotypes, and phospholipid profile was found to be associated with both GWG and postpartum WL in metabolically healthy pregnant women with overweight/obesity. Postpartu

Journal article

Takis P, Jimenez B, Sands C, Chekmeneva E, Lewis Met al., 2020, SMolESY: An efficient and quantitative alternative to on-instrument macromolecular ¹H-NMR signal suppression, Chemical Science, Vol: 11, Pages: 6000-6011, ISSN: 2041-6520

One-dimensional (1D) proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is an established technique for measuring small molecules in a wide variety of complex biological sample types. It is demonstrably reproducible, easily automatable and consequently ideal for routine and large-scale application. However, samples containing proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and other macromolecules produce broad signals which overlap and convolute those from small molecules. NMR experiment types designed to suppress macromolecular signals during acquisition may be additionally performed, however these approaches add to the overall sample analysis time and cost, especially for large cohort studies, and fail to produce reliably quantitative data. Here, we propose an alternative way of computationally eliminating macromolecular signals, employing the mathematical differentiation of standard 1H-NMR spectra, producing small molecule-enhanced spectra with preserved quantitative capability and increased resolution. Our approach, presented in its simplest form, was implemented in a cheminformatic toolbox and successfully applied to more than 3000 samples of various biological matrices rich or potentially rich with macromolecules, offering an efficient alternative to on-instrument experimentation, facilitating NMR use in routine and large-scale applications.

Journal article

Gibson R, Lau C, Loo RL, Ebbels T, Chekmeneva E, Dyer A, Miura K, Ueshima H, Zhao L, Daviglus M, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Elliott P, Holmes E, Chan Qet al., 2019, The association of fish consumption and its urinary metabolites with cardiovascular risk factors: The International Study of Macro-/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP), American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 111, Pages: 280-290, ISSN: 0002-9165

BackgroundResults from observational studies regarding associations between fish (including shellfish) intake and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including blood pressure (BP) and BMI, are inconsistent.ObjectiveTo investigate associations of fish consumption and associated urinary metabolites with BP and BMI in free-living populations.MethodsWe used cross-sectional data from the International Study of Macro-/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP), including 4680 men and women (40–59 y) from Japan, China, the United Kingdom, and United States. Dietary intakes were assessed by four 24-h dietary recalls and BP from 8 measurements. Urinary metabolites (2 timed 24-h urinary samples) associated with fish intake acquired from NMR spectroscopy were identified. Linear models were used to estimate BP and BMI differences across categories of intake and per 2 SD higher intake of fish and its biomarkers.ResultsNo significant associations were observed between fish intake and BP. There was a direct association with fish intake and BMI in the Japanese population sample (P trend = 0.03; fully adjusted model). In Japan, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and taurine, respectively, demonstrated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.81 and 0.78 in discriminating high against low fish intake, whereas homarine (a metabolite found in shellfish muscle) demonstrated an AUC of 0.80 for high/nonshellfish intake. Direct associations were observed between urinary TMAO and BMI for all regions except Japan (P < 0.0001) and in Western populations between TMAO and BP (diastolic blood pressure: mean difference 1.28; 95% CI: 0.55, 2.02 mmHg; P = 0.0006, systolic blood pressure: mean difference 1.67; 95% CI: 0.60, 2.73 mmHg; P = 0.002).ConclusionsUrinary TMAO showed a stronger association with fish intake in the Japanese compared with the Western population sample. Urinary TMAO was directly associated with BP in the Western but not the Japanese popula

Journal article

Tzoulaki I, Castagné R, Boulangé CL, Karaman I, Chekmeneva E, Evangelou E, Ebbels TMD, Kaluarachchi MR, Chadeau-Hyam M, Mosen D, Dehghan A, Moayyeri A, Ferreira DLS, Guo X, Rotter JI, Taylor KD, Kavousi M, De Vries PS, Lehne B, Loh M, Hofman A, Nicholson JK, Chambers J, Gieger C, Holmes E, Tracy R, Kooner J, Greenland P, Franco OH, Herrington D, Lindon JC, Elliott Pet al., 2019, Serum metabolic signatures of coronary and carotid atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease, European Heart Journal, Vol: 40, Pages: 2883-2896, ISSN: 1522-9645

Aims: To characterise serum metabolic signatures associated with atherosclerosis in the coronary or carotid arteries and subsequently their association with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods and Results: We used untargeted one-dimensional (1D) serum metabolic profiling by proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy among 3,867 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), with replication among 3,569 participants from the Rotterdam and LOLIPOP Studies. Atherosclerosis was assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). We used multivariable linear regression to evaluate associations between NMR features and atherosclerosis accounting for multiplicity of comparisons. We then examined associations between metabolites associated with atherosclerosis and incident CVD available in MESA and Rotterdam and explored molecular networks through bioinformatics analyses. Overall, 30 NMR measured metabolites were associated with CAC and/or IMT, P =1.3x10-14 to 6.5x10-6 (discovery), P =4.2x10-14 to 4.4x10-2 (replication). These associations were substantially attenuated after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Metabolites associated with atherosclerosis revealed disturbances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, branched-chain and aromatic amino acid metabolism, as well as oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways. Analyses of incident CVD events showed inverse associations with creatine, creatinine and phenylalanine, and direct associations with mannose, acetaminophen-glucuronide and lactate as well as apolipoprotein B (P <0.05). Conclusion: Metabolites associated with atherosclerosis were largely consistent between the two vascular beds (coronary and carotid arteries) and predominantly tag pathways that overlap with the known cardiovascular risk factors. We present an integrated systems network that highlights a series of inter-connected pathways underlying atherosclero

Journal article

McGill D, Chekmeneva E, Lindon J, Takats Z, Nicholson Jet al., 2019, Application of novel solid phase extraction-NMR protocols for metabolic profiling of human urine, Faraday Discussions, Vol: 218, Pages: 395-416, ISSN: 1359-6640

Metabolite identification and annotation procedures are necessary for the discovery of biomarkers indicative of phenotypes or disease states, but these processes can be bottlenecked by the sheer complexity of biofluids containing thousands of different compounds. Here we describe low-cost novel SPE-NMR protocols utilising different cartridges and conditions, on both natural and artifical urine mixtures, which produce unique retention profiles useful to metabolic profiling. We find that different SPE methods applied to biofluids such as urine can be used to selectively retain metabolites based on compound taxonomy or other key functional groups, reducing peak overlap through concentration and fractionation of unknowns and hence promising greater control over the metabolite annotation/identification process.

Journal article

Whiley L, Chekmeneva E, Berry DJ, Jimenez B, Yuen AHY, Salam A, Hussain H, Witt M, Takats Z, Nicholson JK, Lewis MRet al., 2019, Systematic isolation and structure elucidation of urinary metabolites optimized for the analytical-scale molecular profiling laboratory, Analytical Chemistry, Vol: 91, Pages: 8873-8882, ISSN: 0003-2700

Annotation and identification of metabolite biomarkers is critical for their biological interpretation in metabolic phenotyping studies, presenting a significant bottleneck in the successful implementation of untargeted metabolomics. Here, a systematic multi-step protocol was developed for the purification and de novo structural elucidation of urinary metabolites. The protocol is most suited for instances where structure elucidation and metabolite annotation are critical for the downstream biological interpretation of metabolic phenotyping studies. First, a bulk urine pool was desalted using ion-exchange resins enabling large-scale fractionation using precise iterations of analytical scale chromatography. Primary urine fractions were collected and assembled into a “fraction bank” suitable for long-term laboratory storage. Secondary and tertiary fractionations exploited differences in selectivity across a range of reversed-phase chemistries, achieving the purification of metabolites of interest yielding an amount of material suitable for chemical characterisation. To exemplify the application of the systematic workflow in a diverse set of cases, four metabolites with a range of physico-chemical properties were selected and purified from urine and subjected to chemical formula and structure elucidation by respective magnetic resonance mass spectrometry (MRMS) and NMR analyses. Their structures were fully assigned as teterahydropentoxyline, indole-3-acetic-acid-O-glucuronide, p-cresol glucuronide, and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide. Unused effluent was collected, dried and returned to the fraction bank, demonstrating the viability of the system for repeat use in metabolite annotation with a high degree of efficiency.

Journal article

Graça G, Serrano Contreras JI, Chekmeneva E, 2019, NMR Spectroscopy, Techniques, Pulse Sequences for Structural Elucidation of Small Molecules, Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, 3rd edition, Volume 7, ISBN: 9780081019832

NMR spectroscopy is the most comprehensive analytical tool for chemical structure elucidation and verification. This article aims at introducing and explaining the basics of the most useful NMR pulse sequences for structural elucidation of small organic molecules such as metabolites, drugs and natural products. Step by step we introduce the experiments that are needed to determine the backbone structure and stereochemistry, terminating with a brief description of some of the latest developments in pulse sequences for improving spectral resolution and acquisition. The described experiments are available in most modern NMR spectrometers, from high-resolution systems to benchtop systems.

Book chapter

Gibson R, Lau C-H, Loo RL, Ebbles T, Chekmeneva E, Dyer A, Miura K, Ueshima H, Zhao L, Elliott P, Daviglus M, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Holmes E, Chan Qet al., 2018, American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2019 Scientific Sessions, American Heart Association EpiLifestyle

Conference paper

Chekmeneva E, Dos Santos Correia G, Gomez Romero M, Stamler J, Chan Q, Elliott P, Nicholson J, Holmes Eet al., 2018, Ultra performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and direct infusion-high resolution mass spectrometry for combined exploratory and targeted metabolic profiling of human urine, Journal of Proteome Research, Vol: 17, Pages: 3492-3502, ISSN: 1535-3893

The application of metabolic phenotyping to epidemiological studies involving thousands of biofluid samples presents a challenge for the selection of analytical platforms that meet the requirements of high-throughput precision analysis and cost-effectiveness. Here, direct infusion nanoelectrospray (DI-nESI)- was compared to an ultra-performance (UPLC)-high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) method for metabolic profiling of an exemplary set of 132 human urine samples from a large epidemiological cohort. Both methods were developed and optimised to allow simultaneous collection of high resolution urinary metabolic profiles and quantitative data for a selected panel of 35 metabolites. The total run time for measuring the sample set in both polarities by UPLC-HRMS was of 5 days compared to 9 hours by DI-nESI-HRMS. To compare the classification ability of the two MS methods we performed exploratory analysis of the full-scan HRMS profiles to detect sex-related differences in biochemical composition. Although metabolite identification is less specific in DI-nESI-HRMS, the significant features responsible for discrimination between sexes were mostly the same in both MS-based platforms. Using the quantitative data we showed that 10 metabolites have strong correlation (Pearson’s r > 0.9 and Passing-Bablok regression slope 0.8-1.3) and good agreement assessed by Bland-Altman plots between UPLC-HRMS and DI-nESI-HRMS and thus, can be measured using a cheaper and less sample- and time-consuming method. Only five metabolites showed weak correlation (Pearson’s r< 0.4) and poor agreement due to the overestimation of the results by DI-nESI-HRMS, and the rest of metabolites showed acceptable correlation between the two methods.

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Correia GDS, Chan Q, Wijeyesekera A, Tin A, Young JH, Elliott P, Nicholson JK, Holmes Eet al., 2017, Optimization and Application of Direct Infusion Nanoelectrospray HRMS Method for Large-Scale Urinary Metabolic Phenotyping in Molecular Epidemiology, JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH, Vol: 16, Pages: 1646-1658, ISSN: 1535-3893

Large-scale metabolic profiling requires the development of novel economical high-throughput analytical methods to facilitate characterization of systemic metabolic variation in population phenotypes. We report a fit-for-purpose direct infusion nanoelectrospray high-resolution mass spectrometry (DI-nESI-HRMS) method with time-of-flight detection for rapid targeted parallel analysis of over 40 urinary metabolites. The newly developed 2 min infusion method requires <10 μL of urine sample and generates high-resolution MS profiles in both positive and negative polarities, enabling further data mining and relative quantification of hundreds of metabolites. Here we present optimization of the DI-nESI-HRMS method in a detailed step-by-step guide and provide a workflow with rigorous quality assessment for large-scale studies. We demonstrate for the first time the application of the method for urinary metabolic profiling in human epidemiological investigations. Implementation of the presented DI-nESI-HRMS method enabled cost-efficient analysis of >10 000 24 h urine samples from the INTERMAP study in 12 weeks and >2200 spot urine samples from the ARIC study in <3 weeks with the required sensitivity and accuracy. We illustrate the application of the technique by characterizing the differences in metabolic phenotypes of the USA and Japanese population from the INTERMAP study.

Journal article

Oude Griep LM, Chekmeneva E, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Chan Q, Ebbels TMD, Holmes E, Frost GS, Elliott Pet al., 2016, Urinary hippurate and proline betaine relative to fruit intake, blood pressure, and body mass index, Summer meeting 2016: New technology in nutrition research and practice, Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP), Pages: E178-E178, ISSN: 0029-6651

Conference paper

Gray N, Adesina-Georgiadis K, Chekmeneva E, Plumb RS, Wilson ID, Nicholson JKet al., 2016, Development of a Rapid Microbore Metabolic Profiling (RAMMP) UPLC-MS Approach for High-Throughput Phenotyping Studies., Analytical Chemistry, Vol: 88, Pages: 5742-5751, ISSN: 0003-2700

A rapid gradient microbore UPLC-MS method has been developed to provide a high-throughput analytical platform for the metabolic phenotyping of urine from large sample cohorts. The rapid microbore metabolic profiling (RAMMP) approach was based on scaling a conventional reversed-phase UPLC-MS method for urinary profiling from 2.1 x 100 mm columns to 1 x 50 mm columns, increasing the linear velocity of the solvent, and decreasing the gradient time to provide an analysis time of 2.5 min/sample. Comparison showed that conventional UPLC-MS and rapid gradient approaches provided peak capacities of 150 and 50 respectively, with the conventional method detecting approximately 19,000 features compared to the ca. 6000 found using the rapid gradient method. Similar levels of repeatability were seen for both methods. Despite the reduced peak capacity and the reduction in ions detected, the RAMMP method was able to achieve similar levels of group discrimination as conventional UPLC-MS when applied to rat urine samples obtained from investigative studies on the effects of acute 2-bromophenol and chronic acetaminophen administration. When compared to a direct infusion MS method of similar analysis time the RAMMP method provided superior selectivity. The RAMMP approach provides a robust and sensitive method that is well suited to high-throughput metabonomic analysis of complex mixtures such as urine combined with a five fold reduction in analysis time compared with the conventional UPLC-MS method.

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Correia G, Denes J, Gomez-Romero M, Wijeyesekera A, Perenyi DR, Koot Y, Boomsma C, Want EJ, Dixon PH, Macklon NS, Chan Q, Takats Z, Nicholson JK, Holmes Eet al., 2015, Development of nanoelectrospray high resolution isotope dilution mass spectrometry for targeted quantitative analysis of urinary metabolites: application to population profiling and clinical studies, Analytical Methods, Vol: 7, Pages: 5122-5133, ISSN: 1759-9679

An automated chip-based electrospray platform was used to develop a high-throughput nanoelectrospray high resolution mass spectrometry (nESI-HRMS) method for multiplexed parallel untargeted and targeted quantitative metabolic analysis of urine samples. The method was demonstrated to be suitable for metabolic analysis of large sample numbers and can be applied to large-scale epidemiological and stratified medicine studies. The method requires a small amount of sample (5 μL of injectable volume containing 250 nL of original sample), and the analysis time for each sample is three minutes per sample to acquire data in both negative and positive ion modes. Identification of metabolites was based on the high resolution accurate mass and tandem mass spectrometry using authentic standards. The method was validated for 8 targeted metabolites and was shown to be precise and accurate. The mean accuracy of individual measurements being 106% and the intra- and inter-day precision (expressed as relative standard deviations) were 9% and 14%, respectively. Selected metabolites were quantified by standard addition calibration using the stable isotope labelled internal standards in a pooled urine sample, to account for any matrix effect. The multiple point standard addition calibration curves yielded correlation coefficients greater than 0.99, and the linear dynamic range was more than three orders of magnitude. As a proof-of-concept the developed method was applied for targeted quantitative analysis of a set of 101 urine samples obtained from female participants with different pregnancy outcomes. In addition to the specifically targeted metabolites, several other metabolites were quantified relative to the internal standards. Based on the calculated concentrations, some metabolites showed significant differences according to different pregnancy outcomes. The acquired high resolution full-scan data were used for further untargeted fingerprinting and improved the differentiation of

Journal article

Adams H, Chekmeneva E, Hunter CA, Misuraca MC, Navarro C, Turega SMet al., 2013, Correction to "Quantification of the Effect of Conformational Restriction on Supramolecular Effective Molarities", J Am Chem Soc

Journal article

Adams H, Chekmeneva E, Hunter CA, Misuraca MC, Navarro C, Turega SMet al., 2013, Quantification of the effect of conformational restriction on supramolecular effective molarities., J Am Chem Soc, Vol: 135, Pages: 1853-1863

The association constants for a family of 96 closely related zinc porphyrin-pyridine ligand complexes have been measured in two different solvents, toluene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE). The zinc porphyrin receptors are equipped with phenol side arms, which can form intramolecular H-bonds with ester or amide side arms on the pyridine ligands. These association constants were used to construct 64 chemical double mutant cycles, which measure the free energy contributions of intramolecular H-bonding interactions to the overall stability of the complexes. Measurement of association constants for the corresponding intermolecular H-bonding interactions allowed determination of the effective molarities (EM) for the intramolecular interactions. Comparison of ligands that feature amide H-bond acceptors and ester H-bonds at identical sites on the ligand framework show that the values of EM are practically identical. Similarly, the values of EM are practically identical in toluene and in TCE. However, comparison of two ligand series that differ by one degree of torsional freedom shows that the values of EM for the flexible ligands are an order of magnitude lower than for the corresponding rigid ligands. This observation holds for a range of different supramolecular architectures with different degrees of receptor-ligand complementarity and suggests that in general the cost of freezing a rotor in supramolecular complexes is of the order of 5 kJ/mol.

Journal article

Esteban, M; Arino, C; Diaz-Cruz JM; Chekmeneva E MA, 2013, Mercury and Low Molecular Mass Substances, Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins, Editors: Krestsinger RH; Uversky VN; Permyakov EA, Publisher: Springer, ISBN: 978-1-4614-1532-9

Book chapter

Walker MG, Gonzalez V, Chekmeneva E, Thomas JAet al., 2012, Temperature-switched binding of a RuII (dppz)/DNA light-switch complex., Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, Vol: 51, Pages: 12107-12110

Journal article

Cavanillas S, Chekmeneva E, Ariño C, Díaz-Cruz JM, Esteban Met al., 2012, Electroanalytical and isothermal calorimetric study of As(III) complexation by the metal poisoning remediators, 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonate and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid., Anal Chim Acta, Vol: 746, Pages: 47-52

A recently developed methodology, which combines voltammetry, ITC, ESI-MS and several chemometric tools, has been applied for the first time to the study of As(III) complexes. The ligands considered, DMSA and DMPS, are commonly used to treat heavy metal poisoning. The study yields a reliable and consistent picture of the binding of As(III) by the chelating therapy agents DMSA and DMPS providing an unambiguous description of the stoichiometries of the complexes (ML(2), with the occasional appearance of ML in the case of DMSA), both ligands have stability constants of the same order, with a logβ(2) of 9.2 and 9.8, respectively. These values confirm the potential efficiency of both ligands in the treatment of As(III) poisoning.

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Hunter CA, Misuraca MC, Turega SMet al., 2012, Steric desolation enhances the effective molarities of intramolecular H-bonding interactions., Org Biomol Chem, Vol: 10, Pages: 6022-6031

Free energy contributions due to intramolecular phosphonate diester-phenol H-bonds have been measured for 20 different supramolecular architectures in cyclohexanone solution. High throughput UV/Vis titrations were used in combination with chemical double mutant cycles to dissect out the contributions of different functional group interactions to the stabilities of over 100 different zinc porphyrin-pyridine ligand complexes. These complexes have previously been characterised in toluene and in 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE) solution. Intramolecular ester-phenol H-bonds that were measured in these less polar solvents are too weak to be detected in cyclohexanone, which is a more competitive solvent. The stability of the intermolecular phosphonate diester-phenol H-bond in cyclohexanone is an order of magnitude lower than in TCE and two orders of magnitude lower than in toluene. As a consequence, only seven of the twenty intramolecular phosphonate diester-phenol interactions that were previously measured in toluene and TCE could be detected in cyclohexanone. The effective molarities (EM) for these intramolecular interactions are different in all three solvents. Determination of the EM accounts for solvent effects on the strengths of the individual H-bonding interactions and the zinc porphyrin-pyridine coordination bond, so the variation in EM with solvent implies that differences in the solvation shells make significant contributions to the overall stabilities of the complexes. The results suggest that steric effects lead to desolvation of bulky polar ligands. This increases the EM values measured in TCE, because ligands that fail to replace the strong interactions made with this solvent are unusually weakly bound compared with ligands that make intramolecular H-bonds.

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Gusmão R, Díaz-Cruz JM, Ariño C, Esteban Met al., 2011, From cysteine to longer chain thiols: thermodynamic analysis of cadmium binding by phytochelatins and their fragments., Metallomics, Vol: 3, Pages: 838-846

Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was used to study the binding of Cd(2+) by phytochelatins ((γGlu-Cys)(n)-Gly, PC(n); n = 1-5) and their selected fragments (Cys, Cys-Gly and γGlu-Cys) in order to understand the influence of the chain length on the complex stabilities and the origin of the enhanced affinities in Tris buffer at pH 7.5 and 8.5 and at 25 °C. Different complexes are formed with glutathione (GSH) and its fragments, Cys, Cys-Gly and γGlu-Cys, and their stabilities depend on the corresponding pK(a) value of the thiol group in the ligands. The stability of Cd-PC(n) complexes increases moving towards higher PC(2-5), as well as the complexing capacity expressed as the number of metal ions that can be bound by one ligand molecule. The affinity of Cd(2+) for the PC(n) can be described by the following GSH < PC(2) < PC(3)≤ PC(4)≤ PC(5) sequence. On the basis of these thermodynamic data it is possible to explain the abundance of certain Cd-PC(n) complexes found in nature. The comprehension of the thermodynamic rules that govern the interactions of Cd(2+) with PC(n) and their constituents is of great service in the research with real plant samples subjected to metal stress and in the development of new strategies of bio/phytoremediation.

Journal article

Gilsanz C, Gusmao R, Chekmeneva E, Serrano N, Diaz-Cruz JM, Arino C, Esteban Met al., 2011, Electroanalysis of the binding and adsorption of Hg2+ with seleno aminoacids by differential pulse and elimination voltammetry at the Au-disk electrode, Electrochimica Acta, Vol: 56, Pages: 5988-5992, ISSN: 0013-4686

The complexation of Se-aminoacids selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenocystine (SeCyst) with Hg2+ was investigated by differential pulsed voltammetry (DPV) on Au-disk electrode. Complexation processes are proposed from the Gaussian Peak Adjustment analysis of DPV titration data. Main complexes were both 1:1 Hg:SeMet and Hg:SeCyst, although the formation of 2:1 complexes can be also proposed for Hg:SeCyst. Elimination voltammetry with linear scan was applied to investigate the adsorption of the ligands and the complexes on the Au surface. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Diaz Cruz JM, Sanchis J, Chekmeneva E, Arino C, Esteban Met al., 2010, Non-linear multivariate curve resolution analysis of voltammetric pH titrations, ANALYST, Vol: 135, Pages: 1653-1662, ISSN: 0003-2654

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Diaz-Cruz JM, Arino C, Esteban Met al., 2010, Complexation of Hg2+ with alpha-Lipoic and Dihydrolipoic Acids: Study by Differential Pulse Voltammetry on Rotating Au-Disk Electrode and ESI-MS, Electroanalysis, Vol: 22, Pages: 177-184, ISSN: 1040-0397

The complexation of the natural antioxidants alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and its reduced form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) with Hg2+ was investigated by a recently proposed differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) method using the rotating Au-disk electrode. Complexation processes are proposed from the multivariate curve resolution by alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) analysis of DPV titration data. Main complexes were both 1:1 Hg: ALA and Hg: DHLA, although the formation of 1:2 complexes can be also deduced. ALA and DHLA show different Hg2+-binding patterns at different pH. Volta in metric findings are completed with the data obtained by electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS), especially in negative mode.

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Diaz-Cruz JM, Arino C, Esteban Met al., 2010, Binding of Hg2+ by Cys, Cys-Gly and reduced glutathione: Study by differential pulse voltammetry on rotating Au-disk electrode, electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry and isothermal titration calorimetry, Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Vol: 644, Pages: 20-24, ISSN: 1572-6657

The study of Hg2+ binding with short-chain thiols as cysteine (Cys), dipeptide Cys-Gly and reduced glutathione (GSH) was performed by a recently proposed voltammetric method, using the rotating Au-disk electrode. For every thiol a similar complexation pattern was obtained. The highly stable Hg(thiol)(2) complexes are formed with an excess (at least twofold) of the ligand, while at lower ligand-to-Hg ratios the Hg(thiol) species formation is observed. These results were deduced on basis of Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) data analysis. The electrochemical results were completed with electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS) experiments that provided the stoichiometries of the complexes. For Cys and Cys-Gly several complexes were detected, depending on the Hg2+-ligand ratio, while for GSH only Hg(GSH) and Hg(GSH)(2) species were observed. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to analyze some thermodynamic characteristic of the interactions between Hg2+ and GSH. This information is valuable because it confirms electroanalytical findings and gives deeper insight into the course of the interactions. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Chekmeneva E, Esteban i Cortada M, 2009, Aplicación de voltamperometría-resolución multivariante de curvas, ESI-MS y valoración isotérmica calorimétrica al estudio de la complejación de fitoquelatinas y compuestos modelo sintéticos

Thesis dissertation

Chekmeneva E, Díaz-Cruz JM, Ariño C, Esteban Met al., 2009, Study of the Hg2+ binding with chelation therapy agents by differential pulse voltammetry on rotating Au-disk electrode and electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry., Anal Chim Acta, Vol: 653, Pages: 77-85

A recently proposed electroanalytical method, using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) on the rotating Au-disk electrode, and electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been applied to study the binding of the pharmaceutical chelating agents meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropanesulfate (DMPS) and D-penicillamine (D-Pen) with Hg(2+). From the use of voltammetric titrations it was possible to obtain a detailed picture of the complexation processes at concentrations much lower than in previous studies. Predominant species were Hg(Pen)(2), Hg(2)(DMSA)(2) and Hg(DMPS)(2). For Pen, Hg(Pen) was also deduced from DPV data, while Hg(2)(Pen)(4) from ESI-MS. For DMSA and DMPS, Hg(2)L species were detected by DPV, and Hg(2)L(3), Hg(3)L(3) as well as Hg(2)(DMPS)(2) and Hg(DMSA)(2) by ESI-MS. When possible, DPV data were analyzed by multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS).

Journal article

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