Imperial College London

ProfessorEduardMaron

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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e.maron CV

 
 
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Location

 

Burlington DanesHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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14 results found

Maron E, Lan C-C, Nutt D, 2018, Imaging and Genetic Approaches to Inform Biomarkers for Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders, and PSTD., Pages: 219-292

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem in the world and also claim the highest health care cost among various neuropsychiatric disorders. Anxiety disorders have a chronic and recurrent course and cause significantly negative impacts on patients' social, personal, and occupational functioning as well as quality of life. Despite their high prevalence rates, anxiety disorders have often been under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, and consequently under-treated. Even with the correct diagnosis, anxiety disorders are known to be difficult to treat successfully. In order to implement better strategies in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment decision, and early prevention for anxiety disorders, tremendous efforts have been put into studies using genetic and neuroimaging techniques to advance our understandings of the underlying biological mechanisms. In addition to anxiety disorders including panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), specific phobias, social anxiety disorders (SAD), due to overlapping symptom dimensions, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (which were removed from the anxiety disorder category in DSM-5 to become separate categories) are also included for review of relevant genetic and neuroimaging findings. Although the number of genetic or neuroimaging studies focusing on anxiety disorders is relatively small compare to other psychiatric disorders such as psychotic disorders or mood disorders, various structural abnormalities in the grey or white matter, functional alterations of activity during resting-state or task conditions, molecular changes of neurotransmitter receptors or transporters, and genetic associations have all been reported. With continuing effort, further genetic and neuroimaging research may potentially lead to clinically useful biomarkers for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of these disorders.

Book chapter

Maron E, Lan C-C, Nutt D, 2018, Correction to: Imaging and Genetic Approaches to Inform Biomarkers for Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders, and PSTD.

This chapter was inadvertently published with Fig. 1 which do not belong to this chapter and hence Fig. 1 is deleted from this chapter later.

Book chapter

Haring L, Mottus R, Kajalaid K, Koch K, Uppin K, Maron E, Vasar Eet al., 2017, The course of cognitive functioning after first-episode of psychosis: A six month follow-up study, SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, Vol: 182, Pages: 31-41, ISSN: 0920-9964

Journal article

Pettai K, Milani L, Tammiste A, Vosa U, Kolde R, Eller T, Nutt D, Metspalu A, Maron Eet al., 2016, Whole-genome expression analysis reveals genes associated with treatment response to escitalopram in major depression, EUROPEAN NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 26, Pages: 1475-1483, ISSN: 0924-977X

Journal article

Maron E, Wall M, Norbury R, Godlewska B, Terbeck S, Cowen P, Matthews P, Nutt DJet al., 2015, Effect of short-term escitalopram treatment on neural activation during emotional processing, Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol: 30, Pages: 33-39, ISSN: 1461-7285

Recent functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging studies have revealed that subchronic medication with escitalopram leads to significantreduction in both amygdala and medial frontal gyrus reactivity during processing of emotional faces, suggesting that escitalopram may have adistinguishable modulatory effect on neural activation as compared with other serotonin-selective antidepressants. In this fMRI study we aimed toexplore whether short-term medication with escitalopram in healthy volunteers is associated with reduced neural response to emotional processing,and whether this effect is predicted by drug plasma concentration. The neural response to fearful and happy faces was measured before and on day7 of treatment with escitalopram (10mg) in 15 healthy volunteers and compared with those in a control unmedicated group (n=14). Significantlyreduced activation to fearful, but not to happy facial expressions was observed in the bilateral amygdala, cingulate and right medial frontal gyrusfollowing escitalopram medication. This effect was not correlated with plasma drug concentration. In accordance with previous data, we showed thatescitalopram exerts its rapid direct effect on emotional processing via attenuation of neural activation in pathways involving medial frontal gyrus andamygdala, an effect that seems to be distinguishable from that of other SSRIs.

Journal article

Maron E, Nutt D, Shlik J, 2012, Neuroimaging of Serotonin System in Anxiety Disorders, CURRENT PHARMACEUTICAL DESIGN, Vol: 18, Pages: 5699-5708, ISSN: 1381-6128

Journal article

Aadamsoo K, Saluveer E, Kueuenarpuu H, Vasar V, Maron Eet al., 2011, Diagnostic stability over 2 years in patients with acute and transient psychotic disorders, NORDIC JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 65, Pages: 381-388, ISSN: 0803-9488

Journal article

Maron E, Toru I, Hirvonen J, Tuominen L, Lumme V, Vasar V, Shlik J, Nutt DJ, Helin S, Nagren K, Tiihonen J, Hietala Jet al., 2011, Gender differences in brain serotonin transporter availability in panic disorder, JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 952-959, ISSN: 0269-8811

Journal article

Muinos-Gimeno M, Espinosa-Parrilla Y, Guidi M, Kagerbauer B, Sipilae T, Maron E, Pettai K, Kananen L, Navines R, Martin-Santos R, Gratacos M, Metspalu A, Hovatta I, Estivill Xet al., 2011, Human microRNAs miR-22, miR-138-2, miR-148a, and miR-488 Are Associated with Panic Disorder and Regulate Several Anxiety Candidate Genes and Related Pathways, BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 69, Pages: 526-533, ISSN: 0006-3223

Journal article

Toru I, Aluoja A, Vohma U, Raag M, Vasar V, Maron E, Shlik Jet al., 2010, Associations between personality traits and CCK-4-induced panic attacks in healthy volunteers, PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH, Vol: 178, Pages: 342-347, ISSN: 0165-1781

Journal article

Maron E, Hettema JM, Shlik J, 2010, Advances in molecular genetics of panic disorder, MOLECULAR PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 15, Pages: 681-701, ISSN: 1359-4184

Journal article

Baldwin DS, Allgulander C, Altamura AC, Angst J, Bandelow B, den Boer J, Boyer P, Davies S, dell'Osso B, Eriksson E, Fineberg N, Fredrikson M, Herran A, Maron E, Metspalu A, Nutt D, van der Wee N, Luis Vazquez-Barquero J, Zohar Jet al., 2010, Manifesto for a European Anxiety Disorders Research Network, EUROPEAN NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 20, Pages: 426-432, ISSN: 0924-977X

Journal article

Maron E, Nutt DJ, Kuikka J, Tiihonen Jet al., 2010, Dopamine transporter binding in females with panic disorder may vary with clinical status, JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Vol: 44, Pages: 56-59, ISSN: 0022-3956

Journal article

Maron E, Toeru I, Hirvonen J, Vasar V, Shlik J, Nutt DJ, Tiihonen J, Hietala Jet al., 2010, Brain serotonin transporter availability in panic disorder: Gender differences and implications for treatment response to escitalopram, 27th CINP Congress Meeting 2010, Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, Pages: 45-45, ISSN: 1461-1457

Conference paper

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