Imperial College London

DrElizabethMuir

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

e.muir

 
 
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Location

 

Reynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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11 results found

Edwards L-J, Gailer R, Ryan N, Mezher-Sikafi R, Muir Eet al., 2024, Teaching professional values and behaviours amidst doctors' industrial action in the United Kingom, MedEdPublish, ISSN: 2312-7996

In 2023, doctors in England voted to take strike action, which has had far-reaching impacts on the NationalHealth Service and, in turn, provision of medical education.“Professional Values and Behaviours” encompasses concepts such as professional identity, qualityhealthcare systems and medical ethics and law. It equips medical students with the skills to navigate theuncertain environment that they will be working within, including the decision whether to take part instrike action.This article outlines the challenges presented by industrial action for teaching Professional Values andBehaviours, on both a theoretical and practical level. In the context of widespread unrest within the medicalprofession, this article may be of interest to those designing and delivering undergraduate curricula inmedical professionalism.

Journal article

Prendergast M, Cardoso Pinto A, Harvey CJ, Muir Eet al., 2024, Burnout in early year medical students: experiences, drivers and the perceived value of a reflection-based intervention, BMC Medical Education, Vol: 24, ISSN: 1472-6920

Introduction:According to the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases, burnout is defined as a syndrome resulting from chronic work-related stress that has not been successfully managed. Burnout is increasingly prevalent amongst medical students and has been shown to lead to worsened academic engagement, feelings of inadequacy, poor mental health and increased risk of withdrawal from the course. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of burnout amongst early year medical students and evaluate the perceived impact of a reflection-based intervention on their awareness and experience of burnout.Methods:The reflection-based intervention comprised two tutorials covering the presentation, drivers, impact and management strategies for burnout syndrome. These were introduced into the second-year medical curriculum at Imperial College London. As part of the reflection-based intervention, students were invited to complete an anonymous Qualtrics form three times during the academic year. This included the Shirom-Melamed Burnout Measure (SMBM) and a free-text question prompting the student to consider their stressors at the time of completing the intervention. The former is composed of 14-questions measuring the extent of feelings or behaviours suggestive of burnout, divided into three categories: physical fatigue, cognitive weariness and emotional exhaustion. At the end of the academic year, students were invited to participate in an online focus group to further explore their experience of burnout and their perceived value of the reflection-based intervention. Results of the SMBM were explored descriptively; free-text questions and the focus group transcript were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.ResultsA total of 59 submissions for the reflection-based intervention were analysed: 26 students participated and consented in the first round, 8 in the second and 25 in the third round. Overall median burnout scores were 4 (IQR 3–5)

Journal article

Mezher-Sikafi R, Hanna H, Boynton L, Kong WM, Muir E, Raby A, Macfarlane Het al., 2023, Autonomy and touch; highlighting the benefits and importance of touch to early years medical students, an evaluation, AMEE Conference

Poster

Idowu Y, Muir E, Easton G, 2016, PBL case writing by students based on early years clinical attachments: a focus group evaluation of a novel approach, JRSM Open, ISSN: 2054-2704

ObjectivesTo evaluate the perception of medical students of the new approach to problem-based learning which involves students writing their own problem-based learning cases based on their recent clinical attachment, and team assessment.DesignFocus group interviews with students using purposive sampling. Transcripts of the audio recordings were analysed using thematic analysis.SettingImperial College School of Medicine, London.ParticipantsMedical students in the second year of the MBBS course, who attended the problem-based learning case writing session.Main outcome measuresTo elicit the students’ views about problem-based learning case writing and team assessment.ResultsThe following broad themes emerged: effect of group dynamics on the process; importance of defining the tutor’s role; role of summative assessment; feedback as a learning tool and the skills developed during the process.ConclusionsOverall the students found the new approach, writing problem-based learning cases based on patients seen during their clinical attachments, useful in helping them to gain a better understanding about the problem-based learning process, promoting creativity and reinforcing the importance of team work and peer assessment which are vital professional skills. Further tutor development and guidance for students about the new approach was found to be important in ensuring it is a good learning experience. We hope this evaluation will be of use to other institutions considering introducing students’ case writing to problem-based learning.

Journal article

Idowu Y, Muir E, Easton G, 2016, Problem-based learning case writing by students based on early years clinical attachments: a focus group evaluation., JRSM Open, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2054-2704

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the perception of medical students of the new approach to problem-based learning which involves students writing their own problem-based learning cases based on their recent clinical attachment, and team assessment. DESIGN: Focus group interviews with students using purposive sampling. Transcripts of the audio recordings were analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING: Imperial College School of Medicine, London. PARTICIPANTS: Medical students in the second year of the MBBS course, who attended the problem-based learning case writing session. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: To elicit the students' views about problem-based learning case writing and team assessment. RESULTS: The following broad themes emerged: effect of group dynamics on the process; importance of defining the tutor's role; role of summative assessment; feedback as a learning tool and the skills developed during the process. CONCLUSIONS: Overall the students found the new approach, writing problem-based learning cases based on patients seen during their clinical attachments, useful in helping them to gain a better understanding about the problem-based learning process, promoting creativity and reinforcing the importance of team work and peer assessment which are vital professional skills. Further tutor development and guidance for students about the new approach was found to be important in ensuring it is a good learning experience. We hope this evaluation will be of use to other institutions considering introducing students' case writing to problem-based learning.

Journal article

Nestel D, Clark S, Tabak D, Ashwell V, Muir E, Paraskevas P, Higham Jet al., 2010, Defining Responsibilities of Simulated Patients in Medical Education, SIMULATION IN HEALTHCARE, Vol: 5, Pages: 161-168, ISSN: 1559-2332

Journal article

Nestel D, Tierney T, Kubacki A, Muir Eet al., 2008, Learning to talk with patients: feasibility of a volunteer simulated patient programme for first-year medical students, International Journal of Clinical Skills, Vol: 2, Pages: 121-128, ISSN: 1753-044X

Journal article

Nestel D, Muir E, Plant M, Kidd J, Thurlow Set al., 2002, Modelling the lay expert for first-year medical students: the actor-patient as teacher, MEDICAL TEACHER, Vol: 24, Pages: 562-564, ISSN: 0142-159X

Journal article

Thurlow S, Plant M, Muir E, 2001, Making teamwork come alive: use of actors and multiprofessional co-leaders in small group teaching about teamwork., Med Educ, Vol: 35, Pages: 1081-1082, ISSN: 0308-0110

Journal article

Muir EH, Ogden J, 2001, Consultations involving people with congenital disabilities: factors that help or hinder giving care, FAMILY PRACTICE, Vol: 18, Pages: 419-424, ISSN: 0263-2136

Journal article

Plant M, Muir EH, Thurlow S, 2001, A symptom survey as 'evidence-based learning', Med Educ, Vol: 35, ISSN: 0308-0110

Journal article

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