Imperial College London

ProfessorElioRiboli

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Chair in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention
 
 
 
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Contact

 

e.riboli Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Julieta Dourado +44 (0)20 7594 3426

 
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Location

 

152Medical SchoolSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

1225 results found

Christakoudi S, Tsilidis K, Evangelou E, Riboli Eet al., 2021, A Body Shape Index (ABSI), hip index and risk of cancer in the UK Biobank cohort, Cancer Medicine, Vol: 10, Pages: 5614-5628, ISSN: 2045-7634

Abdominal size is associated positively with the risk of some cancers but the influence of body mass index (BMI) and gluteofemoral size is unclear because waist and hip circumference are strongly correlated with BMI. We examined associations of 33 cancers with A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and hip index (HI), which are independent of BMI by design, and compared these with waist and hip circumference, using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models in UK Biobank. During a mean follow up of seven years, 14,682 incident cancers were ascertained in 200,289 men and 12,965 cancers in 230,326 women. In men, ABSI was associated positively with cancers of the head and neck (hazard ratio HR=1.14; 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.26 per one standard deviation increment), oesophagus (adenocarcinoma, HR=1.27; 1.12-1.44), gastric cardia (HR=1.31; 1.07-1.61), colon (HR=1.18; 1.10-1.26), rectum (HR=1.13; 1.04-1.22), lung (adenocarcinoma, HR=1.16; 1.03-1.30; squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC), HR=1.33; 1.17-1.52), and bladder (HR=1.15; 1.04-1.27), while HI was associated inversely with cancers of the oesophagus (adenocarcinoma, HR=0.89; 0.79-1.00), gastric cardia (HR=0.79; 0.65-0.96), colon (HR=0.92; 0.86-0.98), liver (HR=0.86; 0.75-0.98), and multiple myeloma (HR=0.86; 0.75-1.00). In women, ABSI was associated positively with cancers of the head and neck (HR=1.27; 1.10-1.48), oesophagus (SCC, HR=1.37; 1.07-1.76), colon (HR=1.08; 1.01-1.16), lung (adenocarcinoma, HR=1.17; 1.06-1.29; SCC, HR=1.40; 1.20-1.63; small-cell, HR=1.39; 1.14-1.69), kidney (clear-cell, HR=1.25; 1.03-1.50), and post-menopausal endometrium (HR=1.11; 1.02-1.20), while HI was associated inversely with skin SCC (HR=0.91; 0.83-0.99), post-menopausal kidney cancer (HR=0.77; 0.67-0.88) and post-menopausal melanoma (HR=0.90; 0.83-0.98). Unusually, ABSI was associated inversely with melanoma in men (HR=0.89; 0.82-0.96) and pre-menopausal women (HR=0.77; 0.65-0.91). Waist and hip circumference reflected associations with BMI

Journal article

Hageman S, Pennells L, Ojeda F, Kaptoge S, Kuulasmaa K, de Vries T, Xu Z, Kee F, Chung R, Wood A, McEvoy JW, Veronesi G, Bolton T, Dendale P, Ference BA, Halle M, Timmis A, Vardas P, Danesh J, Graham I, Salomaa V, Visseren F, De Bacquer D, Blankenberg S, Dorresteijn J, Di Angelantonio E, Achenbach S, Aleksandrova K, Amiano P, Amouyel P, Andersson J, Bakker SJL, Costa RBDP, Beulens JWJ, Blaha M, Bobak M, Boer JMA, Bonet C, Bonnet F, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Braaten T, Brenner H, Brunner F, Brunner EJ, Brunstrom M, Buring J, Butterworth AS, Capkova N, Cesana G, Chrysohoou C, Colorado-Yohar S, Cook NR, Cooper C, Dahm CC, Davidson K, Dennison E, Di Castelnuovo A, Donfrancesco C, Doerr M, Dorynska A, Eliasson M, Engstrom G, Ferrari P, Ferrario M, Ford I, Fu M, Gansevoort RT, Giampaoli S, Gillum RF, de la Camara AG, Grassi G, Hansson P-O, Huculeci R, Hveem K, Iacoviello L, Ikram MK, Jorgensen T, Joseph B, Jousilahti P, Jukema JW, Kaaks R, Katzke V, Kavousi M, Kiechl S, Klotsche J, Koenig W, Kronmal RA, Kubinova R, Kucharska-Newton A, Lall K, Lehmann N, Leistner D, Linneberg A, Lora Pablos D, Lorenz T, Lu W, Luksiene D, Lyngbakken M, Magnussen C, Malyutina S, Marin Ibanez A, Masala G, Mathiesen EB, Matsushita K, Meade TW, Melander O, Meyer HE, Moons KGM, Moreno-Iribas C, Muller D, Muenzel T, Nikitin Y, Nordestgaard BG, Omland T, Onland C, Overvad K, Packard C, Pajak A, Palmieri L, Panagiotakos D, Panico S, Perez-Cornago A, Peters A, Pietila A, Pikhart H, Psaty BM, Quarti-Trevano F, Quiros Garcia JR, Riboli E, Ridker PM, Rodriguez B, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Rosengren A, Roussel R, Sacerdote C, Sans S, Sattar N, Schiborn C, Schmidt B, Schoettker B, Schulze M, Schwartz JE, Selmer RM, Shea S, Shipley MJ, Sieri S, Soderberg S, Sofat R, Tamosiunas A, Thorand B, Tillmann T, Tjonneland A, Tong TYN, Trichopoulou A, Tumino R, Tunstall-Pedoe H, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Tzoulaki J, van der Heijden A, van der Schouw YT, Verschuren WMM, Voelzke H, Waldeyer C, Wareham NJ, Weiderpass E, Weidinger F Wet al., 2021, SCORE2 risk prediction algorithms: new models to estimate 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease in Europe, EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 42, Pages: 2439-2454, ISSN: 0195-668X

Journal article

Clasen J, Heath A, Van Puyvelde H, Huybrechts I, Young Park J, Ferrari P, Johansson M, Scelo G, Midttun Ø, Magne Ueland P, Dahm C, Halkjær J, Olsen A, Johnson T, Katzke V, Schulze M, Masala G, Segrado F, Santucci de Magistris M, Sacerdote C, Ocké M, Luján-Barroso L, Ching-López A, Huerta JM, Ardanaz E, Amiano P, Ericson U, Manjer J, Gylling B, Johansson I, Schmidt J, Weiderpass E, Riboli E, Cross A, Muller Det al., 2021, A comparison of complementary measures of vitamin B6 status, function, and metabolism in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 114, Pages: 338-347, ISSN: 0002-9165

BackgroundVitamin B6 insufficiency has been linked to increased risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. The circulating concentration of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) is a commonly used measure of vitamin B6 status. Ratios of substrates indicating PLP coenzymatic function and metabolism may be useful complementary measures to further explore the role of vitamin B6 in health.ObjectivesWe explored the sensitivity of 5 outcomes, namely PLP concentration, homocysteine:cysteine (Hcy:Cys), cystathionine:cysteine (Cysta:Cys), the 3´-hydroxykynurenine ratio (HKr), and the 4-pyridoxic acid ratio (PAr) to vitamin B6 intake as well as personal and lifestyle characteristics.MedthodsDietary intake and biomarker data were collected from participants from 3 nested case-control studies within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Bayesian regression models assessed the associations of the 5 biomarker outcomes with vitamin B6 intake and personal and lifestyle covariates. Analogous models examined the relations of Hcy:Cys, Cysta:Cys, and HKr with PLP.ResultsIn total, 4608 participants were included in the analyses. Vitamin B6 intake was most strongly associated with PLP, moderately associated with Hcy:Cys, Cysta:Cys, and HKr, and not associated with PAr (fold change in marker given a doubling of vitamin B6 intake: PLP 1.60 [95% credible interval (CrI): 1.50, 1.71]; Hcy:Cys 0.87 [95% CrI: 0.84, 0.90]; Cysta:Cys 0.89 [95% CrI: 0.84, 0.94]; HKr 0.88 [95% CrI: 0.85, 0.91]; PAr 1.00 [95% CrI: 0.95, 1.05]). PAr was most sensitive to age, and HKr was least sensitive to BMI and alcohol intake. Sex and menopause status were strongly associated with all 5 markers.ConclusionsWe found that 5 different markers, capturing different aspects of vitamin B6–related biological processes, varied in their associations with vitamin B6 intake and personal and lifestyle predictors.

Journal article

Agudo A, Cayssials V, Bonet C, Tjønneland A, Overvad K, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Affret A, Fagherazzi G, Katzke V, Schubel R, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, La Vecchia C, Palli D, Grioni S, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Panico S, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Peeters PH, Weiderpass E, Skeie G, Nøst TH, Lasheras C, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Amiano P, Chirlaque M-D, Ardanaz E, Ohlsson B, Dias JA, Nilsson LM, Myte R, Khaw K-T, Perez-Cornago A, Gunter M, Huybrechts I, Cross AJ, Tsilidis K, Riboli E, Jakszyn Pet al., 2021, Inflammatory potential of the diet & risk of gastric cancer in the European Investigation into Cancer & Nutrition, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN: 1938-3207

Journal article

Iguacel I, Schmidt JA, Perez-Cornago A, Van Puyvelde H, Travis R, Stepien M, Scalbert A, Casagrande C, Weiderpass E, Riboli E, Schulze MB, Skeie G, Bodén S, Boeing H, Cross AJ, Harlid S, Jensen TE, Huerta JM, Katzke V, Kühn T, Lujan-Barroso L, Masala G, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Rostgaard-Hansen AL, van der Schouw YT, Vermeulen R, Tagliabue G, Tjønneland A, Trevisan M, Ferrari P, Gunter MJ, Huybrechts Iet al., 2021, Associations between dietary amino acid intakes and blood concentration levels, Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 40, Pages: 3772-3779, ISSN: 0261-5614

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Emerging evidence suggests a role of amino acids (AAs) in the development of various diseases including renal failure, liver cirrhosis, diabetes and cancer. However, mechanistic pathways and the effects of dietary AA intakes on circulating levels and disease outcomes are unclear. We aimed to compare protein and AA intakes, with their respective blood concentrations in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: Dietary protein and AA intakes were assessed via the EPIC dietary questionnaires (DQ) and 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR). A subsample of 3768 EPIC participants who were free of cancer had blood AA concentrations measured. To investigate how circulating levels relate to their respective intakes, dietary AA intake was examined in quintiles and ANOVA tests were run. Pearson correlations were examined for continous associations between intakes and blood concentrations. RESULTS: Dietary AA intakes (assessed with the DQ) and blood AA concentrations were not strongly correlated (-0.15 ≤ r ≤ 0.17) and the direction of the correlations depended on AA class: weak positive correlations were found for most essential AAs (isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine) and conditionally essential AAs (arginine and tyrosine), while negative associations were found for non-essential AAs. Similar results were found when using the 24-HDR. When conducting ANOVA tests for essential AAs, higher intake quintiles were linked to higher blood AA concentrations, except for histidine and phenylalanine. For non-essential AAs and glycine, an inverse relationship was observed. Conditionally-essential AAs showed mixed results. CONCLUSIONS: Weak positive correlations and dose responses were found between most essential and conditionally essential AA intakes, and blood concentrations, but not for the non-essential AAs. These results suggest that intake of dietary AA might b

Journal article

Aredo JV, Luo SJ, Gardner RM, Sanyal N, Choi E, Hickey TP, Riley TL, Huang W-Y, Kurian AW, Leung AN, Wilkens LR, Robbins HA, Riboli E, Kaaks R, Tjonneland A, Vermeulen RCH, Panico S, Marchand LL, Amos CI, Hung RJ, Freedman ND, Johansson M, Cheng I, Wakelee HA, Han SSet al., 2021, Tobacco Smoking and Risk of Second Primary Lung Cancer, JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY, Vol: 16, Pages: 968-979, ISSN: 1556-0864

Journal article

Tsilidis KK, Papadimitriou N, Dimou N, Gill D, Lewis SJ, Martin RM, Murphy N, Markozannes G, Zuber V, Cross AJ, Burrows K, Lopez DS, Key TJ, Travis RC, Perez-Cornago A, Hunter DJ, van Duijnhoven FJB, Albanes D, Arndt V, Berndt SI, Bézieau S, Bishop DT, Boehm J, Brenner H, Burnett-Hartman A, Campbell PT, Casey G, Castellví-Bel S, Chan AT, Chang-Claude J, de la Chapelle A, Figueiredo JC, Gallinger SJ, Giles GG, Goodman PJ, Gsur A, Hampe J, Hampel H, Hoffmeister M, Jenkins MA, Keku TO, Kweon S-S, Larsson SC, Le Marchand L, Li CI, Li L, Lindblom A, Martín V, Milne RL, Moreno V, Nan H, Nassir R, Newcomb PA, Offit K, Pharoah PDP, Platz EA, Potter JD, Qi L, Rennert G, Sakoda LC, Schafmayer C, Slattery ML, Snetselaar L, Schenk J, Thibodeau SN, Ulrich CM, Van Guelpen B, Harlid S, Visvanathan K, Vodickova L, Wang H, White E, Wolk A, Woods MO, Wu AH, Zheng W, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Hughes DJ, Jakszyn P, Kühn T, Palli D, Riboli E, Giovannucci EL, Banbury BL, Gruber SB, Peters U, Gunter MJet al., 2021, Genetically predicted circulating concentrations of micronutrients and risk of colorectal cancer among individuals of European descent: a Mendelian randomization study, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 113, Pages: 1490-1502, ISSN: 0002-9165

BACKGROUND: The literature on associations of circulating concentrations of minerals and vitamins with risk of colorectal cancer is limited and inconsistent. Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support the efficacy of dietary modification or nutrient supplementation for colorectal cancer prevention is also limited. OBJECTIVES: To complement observational and RCT findings, we investigated associations of genetically predicted concentrations of 11 micronutrients (β-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and zinc) with colorectal cancer risk using Mendelian randomization (MR). METHODS: Two-sample MR was conducted using 58,221 individuals with colorectal cancer and 67,694 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium, Colorectal Cancer Transdisciplinary Study, and Colon Cancer Family Registry. Inverse variance-weighted MR analyses were performed with sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of potential violations of MR assumptions. RESULTS: Nominally significant associations were noted for genetically predicted iron concentration and higher risk of colon cancer [ORs per SD (ORSD): 1.08; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.17; P value = 0.05] and similarly for proximal colon cancer, and for vitamin B-12 concentration and higher risk of colorectal cancer (ORSD: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21; P value = 0.01) and similarly for colon cancer. A nominally significant association was also noted for genetically predicted selenium concentration and lower risk of colon cancer (ORSD: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.00; P value = 0.05) and similarly for distal colon cancer. These associations were robust to sensitivity analyses. Nominally significant inverse associations were observed for zinc and risk of colorectal and distal colon cancers, but sensitivity analyses could not be performed. None of these findings survived correction for multiple testing. Genetica

Journal article

Mocci E, Kundu P, Wheeler W, Arslan AA, Beane-Freeman LE, Bracci PM, Brennan P, Canzian F, Du M, Gallinger S, Giles GG, Goodman PJ, Kooperberg C, Le Marchand L, Neale RE, Shu X-O, Visvanathan K, White E, Zheng W, Albanes D, Andreotti G, Babic A, Bamlet WR, Berndt S, Blackford AL, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Buring JE, Campa D, Chanock SJ, Childs EJ, Duell EJ, Fuchs CS, Gaziano JM, Giovannucci EL, Goggins MG, Hartge P, Hassan MM, Holly EA, Hoover RN, Hung RJ, Kurtz RC, Lee I-M, Malats N, Milne RL, Ng K, Oberg AL, Panico S, Peters U, Porta M, Rabe KG, Riboli E, Rothman N, Scelo G, Sesso HD, Silverman DT, Stevens VL, Strobel O, Thompson IM, Tjonneland A, Trichopoulou A, Van den Eeden SK, Wactawski-Wende J, Wentzensen N, Wilkens LR, Yu H, Yuan F, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Amundadottir LT, Li D, Jacobs EJ, Petersen GM, Wolpin BM, Risch HA, Kraft P, Chatterjee N, Klein AP, Stolzenberg-Solomon Ret al., 2021, Smoking Modifies Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci on 2q21.3, CANCER RESEARCH, Vol: 81, Pages: 3134-3143, ISSN: 0008-5472

Journal article

Dianatinasab M, Wesselius A, de Loeij T, Salehi-Abargouei A, Yu EYW, Fararouei M, Brinkman M, van den Brandt P, White E, Weiderpass E, Le Calvez-Kelm F, Gunter MJ, Huybrechts I, Liedberg F, Skeie G, Tjonneland A, Riboli E, Zeegers MPet al., 2021, The association between meat and fish consumption and bladder cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, ISSN: 0393-2990

Journal article

Christakoudi S, Evangelou E, Riboli E, Tsilidis Ket al., 2021, GWAS of allometric body-shape indices in UK Biobank identifies loci suggesting associations with morphogenesis, organogenesis, adrenal cell renewal and cancer, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 2045-2322

Genetic studies have examined body-shape measures adjusted for body mass index (BMI), while allometric indices are additionally adjusted for height. We performed the first genome-wide association study of A Body Shape Index (ABSI), Hip Index (HI) and the new Waist-to-Hip Index and compared these with traditional indices, using data from the UK Biobank Resource for 219,872 women and 186,825 men with white British ancestry and Bayesian linear mixed-models (BOLT-LMM). One to two thirds of the loci identified for allometric body-shape indices were novel. Most prominent was rs72959041 variant in RSPO3 gene, expressed in visceral adipose tissue and regulating adrenal cell renewal. Highly ranked were genes related to morphogenesis and organogenesis, previously additionally linked to cancer development and progression. Genetic associations were fewer in men compared to women. Prominent region-specific associations showed variants in loci VEGFA and HMGA1 for ABSI and KLF14 for HI in women, and C5orf67 and HOXC4/5 for ABSI and RSPO3, VEGFA and SLC30A10 for HI in men. Although more variants were associated with waist and hip circumference adjusted for BMI compared to ABSI and HI, associations with height had previously been reported for many of the additional variants, illustrating the importance of adjusting correctly for height.

Journal article

Aune D, Sen A, Norat T, Riboli E, Folseraas Tet al., 2021, Primary sclerosing cholangitis and the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2045-2322

A diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) has been associated with increased risk of hepatobiliary cancers, colorectal cancer and all-cause mortality in several studies, while associations with cardiovascular disease have been inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published cohort studies on the topic to summarize these associations. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to January 13th, 2020. Cohort studies on PSC and risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, or mortality were included. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using random effects models. The summary RR (95% CI) comparing persons with PSC to persons without PSC was 584.37 (269.42–1267.51, I2 = 89%, n = 4) for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), 155.54 (125.34–193.02, I2 = 0%, n = 3) for hepatobiliary cancer, 30.22 (11.99–76.17, I2 = 0%, n = 2) for liver cancer, 16.92 (8.73–32.78, I2 = 88%, n = 4) for gastrointestinal cancer, 7.56 (2.42–23.62, I2 = 0%, n = 3) for pancreatic cancer, 6.10 (4.19–8.87, I2 = 14%, n = 7) for colorectal cancer (CRC), 4.13 (2.99–5.71, I2 = 80%, n = 5) for total cancer, 3.55 (2.94–4.28, I2 = 46%, n = 5) for all-cause mortality, and 1.57 (0.25–9.69, I2 = 79%, n = 2) for cardiovascular disease. Strong positive associations were observed between PSC and risk of CCA, hepatobiliary cancer, liver cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, pancreatic cancer, CRC, total cancer, and all-cause mortality, but not for cardiovascular disease.

Journal article

Heath A, Clasen J, Jayanth N, Jenab M, Tjønneland A, Petersen K, Overvad K, Srour B, Katzke V, Bergmann M, Schulze M, Masala G, Krogh V, Tumino R, Catalano A, Pasanisi F, Brustad M, Standahl Olsen K, Skeie G, Luján-Barroso L, Rodríguez Barranco M, Amiano P, Santiuste C, Barricarte Gurrea A, Axelson H, Ramne S, Ljungberg B, Watts E, Huybrechts I, Weiderpass E, Riboli E, Muller Det al., 2021, Soft drink and juice consumption and renal cell carcinoma incidence and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol: 30, Pages: 1270-1274, ISSN: 1055-9965

Background: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for more than 80% of kidney cancers in adults, and obesity is a known risk factor. Regular consumption of sweetened beverages has been linked to obesity and several chronic diseases, including some types of cancer. It is uncertain whether soft drink and juice consumption is associated with risk of RCC. We investigated the associations of soft drink and juice consumption with RCC incidence and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).Methods: A total of 389,220 EPIC participants with median age of 52 years at recruitment (1991–2000) were included. Cox regression yielded adjusted HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for RCC incidence and mortality in relation to intakes of juices and total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks.Results: A total of 888 incident RCCs and 356 RCC deaths were identified. In models including adjustment for body mass index and energy intake, there was no higher risk of incident RCC associated with consumption of juices (HR per 100 g/day increment = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97–1.09), total soft drinks (HR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98–1.05), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.94–1.05), or artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.96–1.08). In these fully adjusted models, none of the beverages was associated with RCC mortality (HR, 95% CI per 100 g/day increment 1.06, 0.97–1.16; 1.03, 0.98–1.09; 0.97, 0.89–1.07; and 1.06, 0.99–1.14, respectively).Conclusions: Consumption of juices or soft drinks was not associated with RCC incidence or mortality after adjusting for obesity.

Journal article

Aune D, Schlesinger S, Leitzmann MF, Tonstad S, Norat T, Riboli E, Vatten LJet al., 2021, Physical activity and the risk of heart failure: a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies, European Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 36, Pages: 367-381, ISSN: 0393-2990

Although physical activity is an established protective factor for cardiovascular diseases such as ischemic heart disease and stroke, less is known with regard to the association between specific domains of physical activity and heart failure, as well as the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and heart failure. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies to clarify the relations of total physical activity, domains of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness to risk of heart failure. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to January 14th, 2020. Summary relative risks (RRs) were calculated using random effects models. Twenty-nine prospective studies (36 publications) were included in the review. The summary RRs for high versus low levels were 0.77 (95% CI 0.70–0.85, I2 = 49%, n = 7) for total physical activity, 0.74 (95% CI 0.68–0.81, I2 = 88.1%, n = 16) for leisure-time activity, 0.66 (95% CI 0.59–0.74, I2 = 0%, n = 2) for vigorous activity, 0.81 (95% CI 0.69–0.94, I2 = 86%, n = 3) for walking and bicycling combined, 0.90 (95% CI 0.86–0.95, I2 = 0%, n = 3) for occupational activity, and 0.31 (95% CI 0.19–0.49, I2 = 96%, n = 6) for cardiorespiratory fitness. In dose–response analyses, the summary RRs were 0.89 (95% CI 0.83–0.95, I2 = 67%, n = 4) per 20 MET-hours per day of total activity and 0.71 (95% CI 0.65–0.78, I2 = 85%, n = 11) per 20 MET-hours per week of leisure-time activity. Nonlinear associations were observed in both analyses with a flattening of the dose–response curve at 15–20 MET-hours/week for leisure-time activity. These findings suggest that high levels of total physical activity, leisure-time activi

Journal article

Christakoudi S, Pagoni P, Ferrari P, Cross AJ, Tzoulaki I, Muller DC, Weiderpass E, Freisling H, Murphy N, Dossus L, Fortner RT, Agudo A, Overvad K, Perez-Cornago A, Key TJ, Brennan P, Johansson M, Tjønneland A, Halkjær J, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Artaud F, Severi G, Kaaks R, Schulze MB, Bergmann MM, Masala G, Grioni S, Simeon V, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Skeie G, Rylander C, Borch KB, Quirós JR, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Chirlaque M-D, Ardanaz E, Amiano P, Drake I, Stocks T, Häggström C, Harlid S, Ellingjord-Dale M, Riboli E, Tsilidis KKet al., 2021, Weight change in middle adulthood and risk of cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, International Journal of Cancer, Vol: 148, Pages: 1637-1651, ISSN: 0020-7136

Obesity is a risk factor for several major cancers. Associations of weight change in middle adulthood with cancer risk, however, are less clear. We examined the association of change in weight and body mass index (BMI) category during middle adulthood with 42 cancers, using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Of 241,323 participants (31% men), 20% lost and 32% gained weight (>0.4 to 5.0 kg/year) during 6.9 years (average). During 8.0 years of follow-up after the second weight assessment, 20,960 incident cancers were ascertained. Independent of baseline BMI, weight gain (per one kg/year increment) was positively associated with cancer of the corpus uteri (hazard ratio HR=1.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.23). Compared to stable weight (+/-0.4 kg/year), weight gain (>0.4 to 5.0 kg/year) was positively associated with cancers of the gallbladder and bile ducts (HR=1.41; 1.01-1.96), post-menopausal breast (HR=1.08, 1.00-1.16) and thyroid (HR=1.40; 1.04-1.90). Compared to maintaining normal weight, maintaining overweight or obese BMI (World Health Organization categories) was positively associated with most obesity-related cancers. Compared to maintaining the baseline BMI category, weight gain to a higher BMI category was positively associated with cancers of the post-menopausal breast (HR=1.19; 1.06-1.33), ovary (HR=1.40; 1.04-1.91), corpus uteri (HR=1.42; 1.06-1.91), kidney (HR=1.80; 1.20-2.68) and pancreas in men (HR=1.81; 1.11-2.95). Losing weight to a lower BMI category, however, was inversely associated with cancers of the corpus uteri (HR=0.40; 0.23-0.69) and colon (HR=0.69; 0.52-0.92). Our findings support avoiding weight gain and encouraging weight loss in middle adulthood.

Journal article

Ellingjord-Dale M, Christakoudi S, Weiderpass E, Panico S, Dossus L, Olsen A, Tjønneland A, Kaaks R, Schulze MB, Masala G, Gram IT, Skeie G, Rosendahl AH, Sund M, Key T, Ferrari P, Gunter M, Heath AK, Tsilidis KK, Riboli E, Additional Authorset al., 2021, Long-term weight change and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study., International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN: 0300-5771

BACKGROUND: The role of obesity and weight change in breast-cancer development is complex and incompletely understood. We investigated long-term weight change and breast-cancer risk by body mass index (BMI) at age 20 years, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hormone-receptor status. METHODS: Using data on weight collected at three different time points from women who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, we investigated the association between weight change from age 20 years until middle adulthood and risk of breast cancer. RESULTS: In total, 150 257 women with a median age of 51 years at cohort entry were followed for an average of 14 years (standard deviation = 3.9) during which 6532 breast-cancer cases occurred. Compared with women with stable weight (±2.5 kg), long-term weight gain >10 kg was positively associated with postmenopausal breast-cancer risk in women who were lean at age 20 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.22-1.65] in ever HRT users (HR = 1.23; 1.04-1.44), in never HRT users (HR = 1.40; 1.16-1.68) and in oestrogen-and-progesterone-receptor-positive (ER+PR+) breast cancer (HR = 1.46; 1.15-1.85). CONCLUSION: Long-term weight gain was positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer in women who were lean at age 20, both in HRT ever users and non-users, and hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer.

Journal article

Yu EY-W, Wesselius A, Mehrkanoon S, Goosens M, Brinkman M, van den Brandt P, Grant EJ, White E, Weiderpass E, Le Calvez-Kelm F, Gunter MJ, Huybrechts I, Riboli E, Tjonneland A, Masala G, Giles GG, Milne RL, Zeegers MPet al., 2021, Vegetable intake and the risk of bladder cancer in the BLadder Cancer Epidemiology and Nutritional Determinants (BLEND) international study, BMC MEDICINE, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1741-7015

Journal article

Conti DV, Darst BF, Moss LC, Saunders EJ, Sheng X, Chou A, Schumacher FR, Al Olama AA, Benlloch S, Dadaev T, Brook MN, Sahimi A, Hoffmann TJ, Takahashi A, Matsuda K, Momozawa Y, Fujita M, Muir K, Lophatananon A, Wan P, Le Marchand L, Wilkens LR, Stevens VL, Gapstur SM, Carter BD, Schleutker J, Tammela TLJ, Sipeky C, Auvinen A, Giles GG, Southey MC, MacInnis RJ, Cybulski C, Wokolorczyk D, Lubinski J, Neal DE, Donovan JL, Hamdy FC, Martin RM, Nordestgaard BG, Nielsen SF, Weischer M, Bojesen SE, Roder MA, Iversen P, Batra J, Chambers S, Moya L, Horvath L, Clements JA, Tilley W, Risbridger GP, Gronberg H, Aly M, Szulkin R, Eklund M, Nordstrom T, Pashayan N, Dunning AM, Ghoussaini M, Travis RC, Key TJ, Riboli E, Park JY, Sellers TA, Lin H-Y, Albanes D, Weinstein SJ, Mucci LA, Giovannucci E, Lindstrom S, Kraft P, Hunter DJ, Penney KL, Turman C, Tangen CM, Goodman PJ, Thompson IM, Hamilton RJ, Fleshner NE, Finelli A, Parent M-E, Stanford JL, Ostrander EA, Geybels MS, Koutros S, Freeman LEB, Stampfer M, Wolk A, Hakansson N, Andriole GL, Hoover RN, Machiela MJ, Sorensen KD, Borre M, Blot WJ, Zheng W, Yeboah ED, Mensah JE, Lu Y-J, Zhang H-W, Feng N, Mao X, Wu Y, Zhao S-C, Sun Z, Thibodeau SN, McDonnell SK, Schaid DJ, West CML, Burnet N, Barnett G, Maier C, Schnoeller T, Luedeke M, Kibel AS, Drake BF, Cussenot O, Cancel-Tassin G, Menegaux F, Truong T, Koudou YA, John EM, Grindedal EM, Maehle L, Khaw K-T, Ingles SA, Stern MC, Vega A, Gomez-Caamano A, Fachal L, Rosenstein BS, Kerns SL, Ostrer H, Teixeira MR, Paulo P, Brandao A, Watya S, Lubwama A, Bensen JT, Fontham ETH, Mohler J, Taylor JA, Kogevinas M, Llorca J, Castano-Vinyals G, Cannon-Albright L, Teerlink CC, Huff CD, Strom SS, Multigner L, Blanchet P, Brureau L, Kaneva R, Slavov C, Mitev V, Leach RJ, Weaver B, Brenner H, Cuk K, Holleczek B, Saum K-U, Klein EA, Hsing AW, Kittles RA, Murphy AB, Logothetis CJ, Kim J, Neuhausen SL, Steele L, Ding YC, Isaacs WB, Nemesure B, Hennis AJM, Carpten J, Pandha H, Michael A, De Ruyck Ket al., 2021, Trans-ancestry genome-wide association meta-analysis of prostate cancer identifies new susceptibility loci and informs genetic risk prediction (vol 53, pg 65, 2021), NATURE GENETICS, Vol: 53, Pages: 413-413, ISSN: 1061-4036

Journal article

Papadimitriou N, Dimou N, Gill D, Tzoulaki I, Murphy N, Riboli E, Lewis SJ, Martin RM, Gunter MJ, Tsilidis KKet al., 2021, Genetically predicted circulating concentrations of micro-nutrients and risk of breast cancer: A Mendelian randomization study, International Journal of Cancer, Vol: 148, Pages: 646-653, ISSN: 0020-7136

The epidemiological literature reports inconsistent associations between consumption or circulating concentrations of micro-nutrients and breast cancer risk. We investigated associations between genetically predicted concentrations of 11 micro-nutrients (beta-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and zinc) and breast cancer risk using Mendelian randomization (MR). A two-sample MR study was conducted using 122,977 women with breast cancer and 105,974 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. MR analyses were conducted using the inverse variance weighted approach, and sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the impact of potential violations of MR assumptions. One standard deviation (SD: 0.08 mmol/L) higher genetically predicted concentration of magnesium was associated with a 17% (odds ratio [OR]: 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10 to 1.25, P-value=9.1 ×10-7 ) and 20% (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08 to 1.34, P-value=3.2×10-6 ) higher risk of overall and ER+ve breast cancer, respectively. An inverse association was observed for a SD (0.5 mg/dL) higher genetically predicted phosphorus concentration and ER-ve breast cancer (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72 to 0.98, P-value=0.03). There was little evidence that any other nutrient was associated with breast cancer. The results for magnesium were robust under all sensitivity analyses and survived correction for multiple comparisons. Higher circulating concentrations of magnesium and potentially phosphorus may affect breast cancer risk. Further work is required to replicate these findings and investigate underlying mechanisms.

Journal article

Lofvenborg JE, Carlsson S, Andersson T, Hampe CS, Koulman A, Chirlaque Lopez MD, Jakszyn P, Katzke VA, Kuhn T, Kyro C, Masala G, Nilsson PM, Overvad K, Panico S, Sanchez M-J, van der Schouw Y, Schulze MB, Tjonneland A, Weiderpass E, Riboli E, Forouhi NG, Sharp SJ, Rolandsson O, Wareham NJet al., 2021, Interaction Between GAD65 Antibodies and Dietary Fish Intake or Plasma Phospholipid n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Incident Adult-Onset Diabetes: The EPIC-InterAct Study, DIABETES CARE, Vol: 44, Pages: 416-424, ISSN: 0149-5992

Journal article

Perez-Cornago A, Crowe FL, Appleby PN, Bradbury KE, Wood AM, Jakobsen MU, Johnson L, Sacerdote C, Steur M, Weiderpass E, Würtz AML, Kühn T, Katzke V, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, La Vecchia C, Masala G, Tumino R, Panico S, Sluijs I, Skeie G, Imaz L, Petrova D, Quirós JR, Yohar SMC, Jakszyn P, Melander O, Sonestedt E, Andersson J, Wennberg M, Aune D, Riboli E, Schulze MB, di Angelantonio E, Wareham NJ, Danesh J, Forouhi NG, Butterworth AS, Key TJet al., 2021, Plant foods, dietary fibre and risk of ischaemic heart disease in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort, International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 50, Pages: 212-222, ISSN: 0300-5771

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets rich in plant foods are associated with a lower risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but there is sparse information on fruit and vegetable subtypes and sources of dietary fibre. This study examined the associations of major plant foods, their subtypes and dietary fibre with risk of IHD in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis of 490 311 men and women without a history of myocardial infarction or stroke at recruitment (12.6 years of follow-up, n cases = 8504), in 10 European countries. Dietary intake was assessed using validated questionnaires, calibrated with 24-h recalls. Multivariable Cox regressions were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of IHD. RESULTS: There was a lower risk of IHD with a higher intake of fruit and vegetables combined [HR per 200 g/day higher intake 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90-0.99, P-trend = 0.009], and with total fruits (per 100 g/day 0.97, 0.95-1.00, P-trend = 0.021). There was no evidence for a reduced risk for fruit subtypes, except for bananas. Risk was lower with higher intakes of nuts and seeds (per 10 g/day 0.90, 0.82-0.98, P-trend = 0.020), total fibre (per 10 g/day 0.91, 0.85-0.98, P-trend = 0.015), fruit and vegetable fibre (per 4 g/day 0.95, 0.91-0.99, P-trend = 0.022) and fruit fibre (per 2 g/day 0.97, 0.95-1.00, P-trend = 0.045). No associations were observed between vegetables, vegetables subtypes, legumes, cereals and IHD risk. CONCLUSIONS: In this large prospective study, we found some small inverse associations between plant foods and IHD risk, with fruit and vegetables combined being the most strongly inversely associated with risk. Whether these small associations are causal remains unclear.

Journal article

Conti D, Darst BF, Moss LC, Saunders EJ, Sheng X, Chou A, Schumacher FR, Al Olama AA, Benlloch S, Dadaev T, Brook MN, Sahimi A, Hoffmann TJ, Takahashi A, Matsuda K, Momozawa Y, Fujita M, Muir K, Lophatananon A, Wan P, Le Marchand L, Wilkens LR, Stevens VL, Gapstur SM, Carter BD, Schleutker J, Tammela TLJ, Sipeky C, Auvinen A, Giles GG, Southey MC, MacInnis RJ, Cybulski C, Wokolorczyk D, Lubinski J, Neal DE, Donovan JL, Hamdy FC, Martin RM, Nordestgaard BG, Nielsen SF, Weischer M, Bojesen SE, Roder MA, Iversen P, Batra J, Chambers S, Moya L, Horvath L, Clements JA, Tilley W, Risbridger GP, Gronberg H, Aly M, Szulkin R, Eklund M, Nordstrom T, Pashayan N, Dunning AM, Ghoussaini M, Travis RC, Key TJ, Riboli E, Park JY, Sellers TA, Lin H-Y, Albanes D, Weinstein SJ, Mucci LA, Giovannucci E, Lindstrom S, Kraft P, Hunter DJ, Penney KL, Turman C, Tangen CM, Goodman PJ, Thompson IM, Hamilton RJ, Fleshner NE, Finelli A, Parent M-E, Stanford JL, Ostrander EA, Geybels MS, Koutros S, Freeman LEB, Stampfer M, Wolk A, Hakansson N, Andriole GL, Hoover RN, Machiela MJ, Sorensen KD, Borre M, Blot WJ, Zheng W, Yeboah ED, Mensah JE, Lu Y-J, Zhang H-W, Feng N, Mao X, Wu Y, Zhao S-C, Sun Z, Thibodeau SN, McDonnell SK, Schaid DJ, West CML, Burnet N, Barnett G, Maier C, Schnoeller T, Luedeke M, Kibel AS, Drake BF, Cussenot O, Cancel-Tassin G, Menegaux F, Truong T, Koudou YA, John EM, Grindedal EM, Maehle L, Khaw K-T, Ingles SA, Stern MC, Vega A, Gomez-Caamano A, Fachal L, Rosenstein BS, Kerns SL, Ostrer H, Teixeira MR, Paulo P, Brandao A, Watya S, Lubwama A, Bensen JT, Fontham ETH, Mohler J, Taylor JA, Kogevinas M, Llorca J, Castano-Vinyals G, Cannon-Albright L, Teerlink CC, Huff CD, Strom SS, Multigner L, Blanchet P, Brureau L, Kaneva R, Slavov C, Mitev V, Leach RJ, Weaver B, Brenner H, Cuk K, Holleczek B, Saum K-U, Klein EA, Hsing AW, Kittles RA, Murphy AB, Logothetis CJ, Kim J, Neuhausen SL, Steele L, Ding YC, Isaacs WB, Nemesure B, Hennis AJM, Carpten J, Pandha H, Michael A, De Ruyck Ket al., 2021, Trans-ancestry genome-wide association meta-analysis of prostate cancer identifies new susceptibility loci and informs genetic risk prediction, NATURE GENETICS, Vol: 53, ISSN: 1061-4036

Journal article

Aleksandrova K, Reichmann R, Kaaks R, Jenab M, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Dahm CC, Eriksen AK, Tjønneland A, Artaud F, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Severi G, Hüsing A, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, Peppa E, Panico S, Masala G, Grioni S, Sacerdote C, Tumino R, Elias SG, May AM, Borch KB, Sandanger TM, Skeie G, Sánchez M-J, Huerta JM, Sala N, Gurrea AB, Quirós JR, Amiano P, Berntsson J, Drake I, van Guelpen B, Harlid S, Key T, Weiderpass E, Aglago EK, Cross AJ, Tsilidis KK, Riboli E, Gunter MJet al., 2021, Development and validation of a lifestyle-based model for colorectal cancer risk prediction: the LiFeCRC score, BMC Medicine, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1741-7015

BACKGROUND: Nutrition and lifestyle have been long established as risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Modifiable lifestyle behaviours bear potential to minimize long-term CRC risk; however, translation of lifestyle information into individualized CRC risk assessment has not been implemented. Lifestyle-based risk models may aid the identification of high-risk individuals, guide referral to screening and motivate behaviour change. We therefore developed and validated a lifestyle-based CRC risk prediction algorithm in an asymptomatic European population. METHODS: The model was based on data from 255,482 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study aged 19 to 70 years who were free of cancer at study baseline (1992-2000) and were followed up to 31 September 2010. The model was validated in a sample comprising 74,403 participants selected among five EPIC centres. Over a median follow-up time of 15 years, there were 3645 and 981 colorectal cancer cases in the derivation and validation samples, respectively. Variable selection algorithms in Cox proportional hazard regression and random survival forest (RSF) were used to identify the best predictors among plausible predictor variables. Measures of discrimination and calibration were calculated in derivation and validation samples. To facilitate model communication, a nomogram and a web-based application were developed. RESULTS: The final selection model included age, waist circumference, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, vegetables, dairy products, processed meat, and sugar and confectionary. The risk score demonstrated good discrimination overall and in sex-specific models. Harrell's C-index was 0.710 in the derivation cohort and 0.714 in the validation cohort. The model was well calibrated and showed strong agreement between predicted and observed risk. Random survival forest analysis suggested high model robustness. Beyond age, li

Journal article

Zheng J-S, Luan J, Sofianopoulou E, Imamura F, Stewart ID, Day FR, Pietzner M, Wheeler E, Lotta LA, Gundersen TE, Amiano P, Ardanaz E, Chirlaque M-D, Fagherazzi G, Franks PW, Kaaks R, Laouali N, Mancini FR, Nilsson PM, Onland-Moret NC, Olsen A, Overvad K, Panico S, Palli D, Ricceri F, Rolandsson O, Spijkerman AMW, Sanchez M-J, Schulze MB, Sala N, Sieri S, Tjonneland A, Tumino R, van der Schouw YT, Weiderpass E, Riboli E, Danesh J, Butterworth AS, Sharp SJ, Langenberg C, Forouhi NG, Wareham NJet al., 2021, Plasma Vitamin C and Type 2 Diabetes: Genome-Wide Association Study and Mendelian Randomization Analysis in European Populations, DIABETES CARE, Vol: 44, Pages: 98-106, ISSN: 0149-5992

Journal article

Aune D, Sen A, Kobeissi E, Hamer M, Norat T, Riboli Eet al., 2020, Physical activity and the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2045-2322

The association between physical activity and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm has been inconsistent with some studies reporting a reduced risk while others have found no association. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to quantify the association. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to 3 October 2020. Prospective studies were included if they reported adjusted relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with physical activity. Summary RRs (95% CIs) were estimated using a random effects model. Nine prospective studies (2073 cases, 409732 participants) were included. The summary RR for high vs. low physical activity was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87, I2=58%) and per 20 metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours/week increase of activity was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.74-0.95, I2=59%, n=6). Although the test for nonlinearity was not significant (p=0.09) the association appeared to be stronger when increasing the physical activity level from 0 to around 20-25 MET-hours/week than at higher levels. The current meta-analysis suggest that higher physical activity may reduce the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm, however, further studies are needed to clarify the dose-response relationship between different subtypes and intensities of activity and abdominal aortic aneurysm risk.

Journal article

Singleton RK, Heath AK, Clasen JL, Scelo G, Johansson M, Le Calvez-Kelm F, Weiderpass E, Liedberg F, Ljungberg B, Harbs J, Olsen A, Tjønneland A, Dahm CC, Kaaks R, Fortner RT, Panico S, Tagliabue G, Masala G, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Gram IT, Santiuste C, Bonet C, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Schulze MB, Bergmann MM, Travis RC, Tzoulaki I, Riboli E, Muller Det al., 2020, Risk prediction for renal cell carcinoma: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) prospective cohort study, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN: 1055-9965

Journal article

Bull CJ, Bell JA, Murphy N, Sanderson E, Davey Smith G, Timpson NJ, Banbury BL, Albanes D, Berndt SI, Bezieau S, Bishop DT, Brenner H, Buchanan DD, Burnett-Hartman A, Casey G, Castellvi-Bel S, Chan AT, Chang-Claude J, Cross AJ, de la Chapelle A, Figueiredo JC, Gallinger SJ, Gapstur SM, Giles GG, Gruber SB, Gsur A, Hampe J, Hampel H, Harrison TA, Hoffmeister M, Hsu L, Huang W-Y, Huyghe JR, Jenkins MA, Joshu CE, Keku TO, Kuhn T, Kweon S-S, Le Marchand L, Li CI, Li L, Lindblom A, Martin V, May AM, Milne RL, Moreno V, Newcomb PA, Offit K, Ogino S, Phipps AI, Platz EA, Potter JD, Qu C, Quiros JR, Rennert G, Riboli E, Sakoda LC, Schafmayer C, Schoen RE, Slattery ML, Tangen CM, Tsilidis KK, Ulrich CM, van Duijnhoven FJB, van Guelpen B, Visvanathan K, Vodicka P, Vodickova L, Wang H, White E, Wolk A, Woods MO, Wu AH, Campbell PT, Zheng W, Peters U, Vincent EE, Gunter MJet al., 2020, Adiposity, metabolites, and colorectal cancer risk: Mendelian randomization study, BMC Medicine, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1741-7015

BackgroundHigher adiposity increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this relationship varies by anatomical sub-site or by sex is unclear. Further, the metabolic alterations mediating the effects of adiposity on CRC are not fully understood.MethodsWe examined sex- and site-specific associations of adiposity with CRC risk and whether adiposity-associated metabolites explain the associations of adiposity with CRC. Genetic variants from genome-wide association studies of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, unadjusted for BMI; N = 806,810), and 123 metabolites from targeted nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics (N = 24,925), were used as instruments. Sex-combined and sex-specific Mendelian randomization (MR) was conducted for BMI and WHR with CRC risk (58,221 cases and 67,694 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium, Colorectal Cancer Transdisciplinary Study, and Colon Cancer Family Registry). Sex-combined MR was conducted for BMI and WHR with metabolites, for metabolites with CRC, and for BMI and WHR with CRC adjusted for metabolite classes in multivariable models.ResultsIn sex-specific MR analyses, higher BMI (per 4.2 kg/m2) was associated with 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08, 1.38) times higher CRC odds among men (inverse-variance-weighted (IVW) model); among women, higher BMI (per 5.2 kg/m2) was associated with 1.09 (95% CI = 0.97, 1.22) times higher CRC odds. WHR (per 0.07 higher) was more strongly associated with CRC risk among women (IVW OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.43) than men (IVW OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.81, 1.36). BMI or WHR was associated with 104/123 metabolites at false discovery rate-corrected P ≤ 0.05; several metabolites were associated with CRC, but not in directions that were consistent with the mediation of positive adiposity-CRC relatio

Journal article

Peto J, Hunter DJ, Riboli E, 2020, Covid-19 mass testing: throwing the baby out with the bathwater?, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 371, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Anderson AS, Renehan AG, Saxton JM, Bell J, Cade J, Cross AJ, King A, Riboli E, Sniehotta F, Treweek S, Martin RM, Beeken R, Mitrou Get al., 2020, Cancer prevention through weight control-where are we in 2020?, British Journal of Cancer, Vol: 124, Pages: 1049-1056, ISSN: 0007-0920

Growing data from epidemiological studies highlight the association between excess body fat and cancer incidence, but good indicative evidence demonstrates that intentional weight loss, as well as increasing physical activity, offers much promise as a cost-effective approach for reducing the cancer burden. However, clear gaps remain in our understanding of how changes in body fat or levels of physical activity are mechanistically linked to cancer, and the magnitude of their impact on cancer risk. It is important to investigate the causal link between programmes that successfully achieve short-term modest weight loss followed by weight-loss maintenance and cancer incidence. The longer-term impact of weight loss and duration of overweight and obesity on risk reduction also need to be fully considered in trial design. These gaps in knowledge need to be urgently addressed to expedite the development and implementation of future cancer-control strategies. Comprehensive approaches to trial design, Mendelian randomisation studies and data-linkage opportunities offer real possibilities to tackle current research gaps. In this paper, we set out the case for why non-pharmacological weight-management trials are urgently needed to support cancer-risk reduction and help control the growing global burden of cancer.

Journal article

Anderson AS, Martin RM, Renehan AG, Cade J, Copson ER, Cross AJ, Grimmett C, Keaver L, King A, Riboli E, Shaw C, Saxton JM, Beeken R, Mitrou Get al., 2020, Cancer survivorship, excess body fatness and weight-loss intervention-where are we in 2020?, British Journal of Cancer, Vol: 124, Pages: 1057-1065, ISSN: 0007-0920

Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments mean that the estimated number of cancer survivors in the United Kingdom is expected to reach 4 million by 2030. However, there is an increasing realisation that excess body fatness (EBF) is likely to influence the quality of cancer survivorship and disease-free survival. For decades, the discussion of weight management in patients with cancer has been dominated by concerns about unintentional weight loss, low body weight and interventions to increase weight, often re-enforced by the existence of the obesity paradox, which indicates that high body weight is associated with survival benefits for some types of cancer. However, observational evidence provides strong grounds for testing the hypothesis that interventions for promoting intentional loss of body fat and maintaining skeletal muscle in overweight and obese cancer survivors would bring important health benefits in terms of survival outcomes and long-term impact on treatment-related side effects. In this paper, we outline the need for studies to improve our understanding of the health benefits of weight-loss interventions, such as hypocaloric healthy-eating plans combined with physical activity. In particular, complex intervention trials that are pragmatically designed are urgently needed to develop effective, clinically practical, evidence-based strategies for reducing EBF and optimising body composition in people living with and beyond common cancers.

Journal article

Peto J, Hunter DJ, Riboli E, Griffin JLet al., 2020, Unnecessary obstacles to COVID-19 mass testing, LANCET, Vol: 396, Pages: 1633-1633, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

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