Imperial College London

Prof Ed Tate

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Chemistry

Professor of Chemical Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3752e.tate Website CV

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Agnes Lee +44 (0)20 7594 9852

 
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Location

 

301BMolecular Sciences Research HubWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

205 results found

Mondal M, Conole D, Nautiyal J, Tate Eet al., 2021, UCHL1 as a novel target in breast cancer: emerging insights from cell and chemical biology, British Journal of Cancer, ISSN: 0007-0920

Breast cancer has the highest incidence and death rate among cancers in women worldwide. In particular, metastatic Estrogen Receptor negative (ER–) breast cancer and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) subtypes have very limited treatment options, with low survival rates. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1), a ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase belonging to the deubiquitinase (DUB) family of enzymes, is highly expressed in these cancer types, and several key reports have revealed emerging and important roles for UCHL1 in breast cancer. However, selective and potent small molecule UCHL1 inhibitors have been disclosed only very recently, alongside chemical biology approaches to detect regulated UHCL1 activity in cancer cells. These tools will enable novel insights into oncogenic mechanisms driven by UCHL1, and identification of substrate proteins deubiquitinated by UCHL1, with the ultimate goal of realizing the potential of UCHL1 as a drug target in breast cancer.

Journal article

Panyain N, Godinat A, Thawani AR, Lachiondo-Ortega S, Mason K, Elkhalifa S, Smith LM, Harrigan JA, Tate EWet al., 2021, Activity-based protein profiling reveals deubiquitinase and aldehyde dehydrogenase targets of a cyanopyrrolidine probe, RSC Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN: 2632-8682

Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1), a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a potential drug target in various cancers, and liver and lung fibrosis. However, bona fide functions and substrates of UCHL1 remain poorly understood. Herein, we report the characterization of UCHL1 covalent inhibitor MT16-001 based on a thiazole cyanopyrrolidine scaffold. In combination with chemical proteomics, a closely related activity-based probe (MT16-205) was used to generate a comprehensive quantitative profile for on- and off-targets at endogenous cellular abundance. Both compounds are selective for UCHL1 over other DUBs in intact cells but also engage a range of other targets with good selectivity over the wider proteome, including aldehyde dehydrogenases, redox-sensitive Parkinson’s disease related protein PARK7, and glutamine amidotransferase. Taken together, these results underline the importance of robust profiling of activity-based probes as chemical tools and highlight the cyanopyrrolidine warhead as a versatile platform for liganding diverse classes of protein with reactive cysteine residues which can be used for further inhibitor screening, and as a starting point for inhibitor development.

Journal article

De Vita E, Lucy D, Tate EW, 2021, Beyond targeted protein degradation: LD.ATTECs clear cellular lipid droplets, CELL RESEARCH, Vol: 31, Pages: 945-946, ISSN: 1001-0602

Journal article

Goya Grocin A, Kallemeijn W, Tate E, 2021, Targeting methionine aminopeptidase 2 in cancer, obesity and autoimmunity, Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, ISSN: 0165-6147

Journal article

Kallemeijn W, Lanyon-Hogg T, Panyain N, Goya Grocin A, Ciepla P, morales-sanfrutos J, Tate Eet al., 2021, Proteome-wide analysis of protein lipidation using chemical probes: in-gel fluorescence visualisation, identification and quantification of N-myristoylation, N- and S-acylation, Ocholesterylation, S-farnesylation and S-geranylgeranylation, Nature Protocols, ISSN: 1750-2799

Journal article

Kennedy C, Goya Grocin A, Kovacic T, Singh R, Tate E, Ward J, Shenoy Aet al., 2021, A probe for NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor MCC950 identifies carbonic anhydrase 2 as a novel target, ACS Chemical Biology, Vol: 16, Pages: 982-990, ISSN: 1554-8929

Inhibition of inflammasome and pyroptotic pathways are promising strategies for clinical treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. MCC950, a potent inhibitor of the NLR-family inflammasome pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) protein, has shown encouraging results in animal models for a range of conditions; however, until now, no off-targets have been identified. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and application of a novel photoaffinity alkyne-tagged probe for MCC950 (IMP2070) which shows direct engagement with NLRP3 and inhibition of inflammasome activation in macrophages. Affinity-based chemical proteomics in live macrophages identified several potential off-targets, including carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) as a specific target of IMP2070, and independent cellular thermal proteomic profiling revealed stabilization of CA2 by MCC950. MCC950 displayed noncompetitive inhibition of CA2 activity, confirming carbonic anhydrase as an off-target class for this compound. These data highlight potential biological mechanisms through which MCC950 and derivatives may exhibit off-target effects in preclinical or clinical studies.

Journal article

Lovell S, Zhang L, Kryza T, Neodo A, Bock N, De Vita E, Williams E, Engelsberger E, Xu C, Bakker A, Maneiro M, Tanaka R, Bevan C, Clements J, Tate Eet al., 2021, A suite of activity-based probes to dissect the KLK activome in drug-resistant prostate cancer, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol: 143, Pages: 8911-8924, ISSN: 0002-7863

Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a family of secreted serine proteases, which form a network (the KLK activome) with an important role in proteolysis and signaling. In prostate cancer (PCa), increased KLK activity promotes tumor growth and metastasis through multiple biochemical pathways, and specific quantification and tracking of changes in the KLK activome could contribute to validation of KLKs as potential drug targets. Herein we report a technology platform based on novel activity-based probes (ABPs) and inhibitors enabling simultaneous orthogonal analysis of KLK2, KLK3, and KLK14 activity in hormone-responsive PCa cell lines and tumor homogenates. Importantly, we identifed a significant decoupling of KLK activity and abundance and suggest that KLK proteolysis should be considered as an additional parameter, along with the PSA blood test, for accurate PCa diagnosis and monitoring. Using selective inhibitors and multiplexed fluorescent activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), we dissect the KLK activome in PCa cells and show that increased KLK14 activity leads to a migratory phenotype. Furthermore, using biotinylated ABPs, we show that active KLK molecules are secreted into the bone microenvironment by PCa cells following stimulation by osteoblasts suggesting KLK-mediated signaling mechanisms could contribute to PCa metastasis to bone. Together our findings show that ABPP is a powerful approach to dissect dysregulation of the KLK activome as a promising and previously underappreciated therapeutic target in advanced PCa.

Journal article

LanyonHogg T, Ritzefeld M, Zhang L, Andrei SA, Pogranyi B, Mondal M, Sefer L, Johnston CD, Coupland CE, Greenfield JL, Newington J, Fuchter MJ, Magee AI, Siebold C, Tate EWet al., 2021, Photochemical Probe Identification of a Small‐Molecule Inhibitor Binding Site in Hedgehog Acyltransferase (HHAT)**, Angewandte Chemie, Vol: 133, Pages: 13654-13659, ISSN: 0044-8249

Journal article

Lanyon-Hogg T, Ritzefeld M, Zhang L, Pogranyi B, Mondal M, Sefer L, Johnston CD, Coupland CE, Andrei SA, Newington J, Magee AI, Siebold C, Tate EWet al., 2021, Photochemical probe identification of the small-molecule binding site in a mammalian membrane-bound O-acyltransferase, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Vol: 60, Pages: 13542-13547, ISSN: 1433-7851

The mammalian membrane‐bound O ‐acyltransferase (MBOAT) superfamily is involved in biological processes including growth, development and appetite sensing. MBOATs are attractive drug targets in cancer and obesity; however, information on the binding site and molecular mechanisms underlying small‐molecule inhibition is elusive. This study reports rational development of a photochemical probe to interrogate a novel small‐molecule inhibitor binding site in the human MBOAT Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT). Structure‐activity relationship investigation identified single enantiomer IMP‐1575 , the most potent HHAT inhibitor reported to‐date, and guided design of photocrosslinking probes that maintained HHAT‐inhibitory potency. Photocrosslinking and proteomic sequencing of HHAT delivered identification of the first small‐molecule binding site in a mammalian MBOAT. Topology and homology data suggested a potential mechanism for HHAT inhibition which was confirmed via kinetic analysis. Our results provide an optimal HHAT tool inhibitor IMP‐1575 ( K i = 38 nM) and a strategy for mapping small molecule interaction sites in MBOATs.

Journal article

Tate E, 2021, PROTACs, molecular glues and bifunctionals from bench to bedside: Unlocking the clinical potential of catalytic drugs, Progress in medicinal chemistry, ISSN: 0079-6468

Journal article

Kryza T, Khan T, Lovell S, Harrington BS, Yin J, Porazinski S, Pajic M, Koistinen H, Rantala JK, Dreyer T, Magdolen V, Reuning U, He Y, Tate EW, Hooper JDet al., 2021, Substrate-biased activity-based probes identify proteases that cleave receptor CDCP1, Nature Chemical Biology, Vol: 17, Pages: 776-783, ISSN: 1552-4450

CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is an oncogenic orphan transmembrane receptor and a promising target for the detection and treatment of cancer. Extracellular proteolysis of CDCP1 by poorly defined mechanisms induces pro-metastatic signaling. We describe a new approach for the rapid identification of proteases responsible for key proteolytic events using a substrate-biased activity-based probe (sbABP) that incorporates a substrate cleavage motif grafted onto a peptidyl diphenyl phosphonate warhead for specific target protease capture, isolation and identification. Using a CDCP1-biased probe, we identify urokinase (uPA) as the master regulator of CDCP1 proteolysis, which acts both by directly cleaving CDCP1 and by activating CDCP1-cleaving plasmin. We show that coexpression of uPA and CDCP1 is strongly predictive of poor disease outcome across multiple cancers and demonstrate that uPA-mediated CDCP1 proteolysis promotes metastasis in disease-relevant preclinical in vivo models. These results highlight CDCP1 cleavage as a potential target to disrupt cancer and establish sbABP technology as a new approach to identify disease-relevant proteases.

Journal article

Benns HJ, Storch M, Falco J, Fisher FR, Alves E, Wincott CJ, Baum J, Baldwin GS, Weerapana E, Tate EW, Child MAet al., 2021, Prioritization of antimicrobial targets by CRISPR-based oligo recombineering

<jats:title>Summary</jats:title><jats:p>Nucleophilic amino acids are important in covalent drug development yet underutilized as antimicrobial targets. Over recent years, several chemoproteomic technologies have been developed to mine chemically-accessible residues via their intrinsic reactivity toward electrophilic probes. However, these approaches cannot discern which reactive sites contribute to protein function and should therefore be prioritized for drug discovery. To address this, we have developed a CRISPR-based Oligo Recombineering (CORe) platform to systematically prioritize reactive amino acids according to their contribution to protein function. Our approach directly couples protein sequence and function with biological fitness. Here, we profile the reactivity of &gt;1,000 cysteines on ~700 proteins in the eukaryotic pathogen <jats:italic>Toxoplasma gondii</jats:italic> and prioritize functional sites using CORe. We competitively compared the fitness effect of 370 codon switches at 74 cysteines and identify functional sites in a diverse range of proteins. In our proof of concept, CORe performed &gt;800 times faster than a standard genetic workflow. Reactive cysteines decorating the ribosome were found to be critical for parasite growth, with subsequent target-based screening validating the apicomplexan translation machinery as a target for covalent ligand development. CORe is system-agnostic, and supports expedient identification, functional prioritization, and rational targeting of reactive sites in a wide range of organisms and diseases.</jats:p>

Journal article

Losada de la Lastra A, Hassan S, Tate EW, 2021, Deconvoluting the biology and druggability of protein lipidation using chemical proteomics, Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol: 60, Pages: 97-112, ISSN: 1367-5931

Lipids are indispensable cellular building blocks, and their post-translational attachment to proteins makes them important regulators of many biological processes. Dysfunction of protein lipidation is also implicated in many pathological states, yet its systematic analysis presents significant challenges. Thanks to innovations in chemical proteomics, lipidation can now be readily studied by metabolic tagging using functionalized lipid analogs, enabling global profiling of lipidated substrates using mass spectrometry. This has spearheaded the first deconvolution of their full scope in a range of contexts, from cells to pathogens and multicellular organisms. Protein N-myristoylation, S-acylation, and S-prenylation are the most well-studied lipid post-translational modifications because of their extensive contribution to the regulation of diverse cellular processes. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the study of these post-translational modifications, with an emphasis on how novel mass spectrometry methods have elucidated their roles in fundamental biological processes.

Journal article

Bickel JK, Voisin TB, Tate EW, Bubeck Det al., 2021, How Structures of Complement Complexes Guide Therapeutic Design., Subcell Biochem, Vol: 96, Pages: 273-295, ISSN: 0306-0225

The complement system is essential for immune defence against infection and modulation of proinflammatory responses. Activation of the terminal pathway of complement triggers formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), a multi-protein pore that punctures membranes. Recent advances in structural biology, specifically cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), have provided atomic resolution snapshots along the pore formation pathway. These structures have revealed dramatic conformational rearrangements that enable assembly and membrane rupture. Here we review the structural basis for MAC formation and show how soluble proteins transition into a giant β-barrel pore. We also discuss regulatory complexes of the terminal pathway and their impact on structure-guided drug discovery of complement therapeutics.

Journal article

Kounde CS, Tate EW, 2020, Photoactive bifunctional degraders: precision tools to regulate protein stability., Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Vol: 63, Pages: 15483-15493, ISSN: 0022-2623

Targeted protein degradation with bifunctional degraders is positioned as a remarkable game-changing strategy to control cellular protein levels and promises a new therapeutic modality in drug discovery. Light activation of a degrader to achieve exquisite spatiotemporal control over protein stability in cells has attracted the interest of multiple research groups, with recent reports demonstrating optical control of proteolysis with chimeric molecules bearing photolabile or photoswitchable motifs. In this context of targeted proteolysis research spurring the emergence of innovative tools, we examine the design, synthesis, and properties of light-activated degraders. The significant impact of this approach in regulating disease-relevant protein levels in a light-dependent manner is highlighted with key examples, and future developments to fully harness the potential of light-induced protein degradation with photoactive bifunctional molecules are discussed.

Journal article

Jones B, Fang Z, Chen S, Manchanda Y, Bitsi S, Pickford P, David A, Shchepinova MM, Corrêa Jr IR, Hodson DJ, Broichhagen J, Tate EW, Reimann F, Salem V, Rutter GA, Tan T, Bloom SR, Tomas Aet al., 2020, Ligand-specific factors influencing GLP-1 receptor post-endocytic trafficking and degradation in pancreatic beta cells, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol: 212, Pages: 1-24, ISSN: 1422-0067

The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is an important regulator of blood glucose homeostasis. Ligand-specific differences in membrane trafficking of the GLP-1R influence its signalling properties and therapeutic potential in type 2 diabetes. Here, we have evaluated how different factors combine to control the post-endocytic trafficking of GLP-1R to recycling versus degradative pathways. Experiments were performed in primary islet cells, INS-1 832/3 clonal beta cells and HEK293 cells, using biorthogonal labelling of GLP-1R to determine its localisation and degradation after treatment with GLP-1, exendin-4 and several further GLP-1R agonist peptides. We also characterised the effect of a rare GLP1R coding variant, T149M, and the role of endosomal peptidase endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1), in GLP1R trafficking. Our data reveal how treatment with GLP-1 versus exendin-4 is associated with preferential GLP-1R targeting towards a recycling pathway. GLP-1, but not exendin-4, is a substrate for ECE-1, and the resultant propensity to intra-endosomal degradation, in conjunction with differences in binding affinity, contributes to alterations in GLP-1R trafficking behaviours and degradation. The T149M GLP-1R variant shows reduced signalling and internalisation responses, which is likely to be due to disruption of the cytoplasmic region that couples to intracellular effectors. These observations provide insights into how ligand- and genotype-specific factors can influence GLP-1R trafficking.

Journal article

Shackley M, Ma Y, Brown A, Tate E, Frost G, Hanyaloglu Aet al., 2020, Short chain fatty acids enhance expression and activity of the umami taste receptor in enteroendocrine cells via a Galphai/o pathway, Frontiers in Nutrition, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2296-861X

The short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, butyrate and propionate, are produced by fermentation of non-digestible carbohydrates by the gut microbiota and regulate appetite, adiposity, metabolism, glycemic control, and immunity. SCFAs act at two distinct G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), FFAR2 and FFAR3 and are expressed in intestinal enteroendocrine cells (EECs), where they mediate anorectic gut hormone release. EECs also express other GPCRs that act as nutrient sensors, thus SCFAs may elicit some of their health-promoting effects by altering GPCR expression in EECs and enhance gut sensitivity to dietary molecules. Here, we identify that exposure of the murine EEC STC-1 cell line or intestinal organoids to physiological concentrations of SCFAs enhances mRNA levels of the umami taste receptors TASR1 and TASR3, without altering levels of the SCFA GPCRs, FFAR2 and FFAR3. Treatment of EECs with propionate or butyrate, but not acetate, increased levels of umami receptor transcripts, while propionate also reduced CCK expression. This was reversed by inhibiting Gαi/o signaling with pertussis toxin, suggesting that SCFAs act through FFAR2/3 to alter gene expression. Surprisingly, neither a FFAR3 nor a FFAR2 selective ligand could increase TASR1/TASR3 mRNA levels. We assessed the functional impact of increased TASR1/TASR3 expression using unique pharmacological properties of the umami taste receptor; namely, the potentiation of signaling by inosine monophosphate. Activation of umami taste receptor induced inositol-1-phosphate and calcium signaling, and butyrate pretreatment significantly enhanced such signaling. Our study reveals that SCFAs may contribute to EEC adaptation and alter EEC sensitivity to bioactive nutrients.

Journal article

Caengprasath N, Gonzalez Abuin N, Shchepinova M, Inoue A, Ma Y, Tate E, Frost G, Hanyaloglu Aet al., 2020, Internalization-dependent free fatty acid receptor 2 signaling is essential for propionate- induced anorectic gut hormone release, iScience, Vol: 23, ISSN: 2589-0042

The ability of propionate, a short-chain fatty acid produced from the fermentation of non-digestible carbohydrates in the colon, to stimulate the release of anorectic gut hormones, such as glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), is an attractive approach to enhance appetite regulation, weight management, and glycemic control. Propionate induces GLP-1 release via its G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2), a GPCR that activates Gαi and Gαq/11. However, how pleiotropic GPCR signaling mechanisms in the gut regulates appetite is poorly understood. Here, we identify propionate-mediated G protein signaling is spatially directed within the cell whereby FFA2 is targeted to very early endosomes. Furthermore, propionate activates a Gαi/p38 signaling pathway, which requires receptor internalization and is essential for propionate-induced GLP-1 release in enteroendocrine cells and colonic crypts. Our study reveals that intestinal metabolites engage membrane trafficking pathways and that receptor internalization could orchestrate complex GPCR pathways within the gut.

Journal article

Panyain N, Godinat A, Lanyon-Hogg T, Lachiondo-Ortega S, Will EJ, Soudy C, Mondal M, Mason K, Elkhalifa S, Smith LM, Harrigan JA, Tate EWet al., 2020, Correction to “Discovery of a Potent and Selective Covalent Inhibitor and Activity-Based Probe for the Deubiquitylating Enzyme UCHL1, with Antifibrotic Activity”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol: 142, Pages: 15199-15199, ISSN: 0002-7863

Supporting Information, pages S38 and S44. In the PDF Supporting Information, Schemes S1 and S3 contained errors in the synthetic conditions. The conditions for the steps 5 → 6 and 12 → 13 in the respective schemes should be “TFA, DCM, rt” (not “TMSI, K2CO3, CH2Cl2”).

Journal article

De Vita E, Maneiro M, Tate EW, 2020, The missing link between (Un)druggable and degradable KRAS, ACS Central Science, Vol: 6, Pages: 1281-1284, ISSN: 2374-7943

Journal article

Benns HJ, Wincott CJ, Tate EW, Child MAet al., 2020, Activity- and reactivity-based proteomics: Recent technological advances and applications in drug discovery., Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol: 60, Pages: 20-29, ISSN: 1367-5931

Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is recognized as a powerful and versatile chemoproteomic technology in drug discovery. Central to ABPP is the use of activity-based probes to report the activity of specific enzymes or reactivity of amino acid types in complex biological systems. Over the last two decades, ABPP has facilitated the identification of new drug targets and discovery of lead compounds in human and infectious disease. Furthermore, as part of a sustained global effort to illuminate the druggable proteome, the repertoire of target classes addressable with activity-based probes has vastly expanded in recent years. Here, we provide an overview of ABPP and summarise the major technological advances with an emphasis on probe development.

Journal article

Bell AS, Yu Z, Hutton JA, Wright MH, Brannigan JA, Paape D, Roberts SM, Sutherell CL, Ritzefeld M, Wilkinson AJ, Smith DF, Leatherbarrow R, Tate EWet al., 2020, Novel thienopyrimidine inhibitors of Leishmania N-myristoyltransferase with on-target activity in intracellular amastigotes, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Vol: 14, Pages: 7740-7765, ISSN: 0022-2623

The leishmaniases, caused by Leishmania species of protozoan parasites, are neglected tropical diseases with 12-15 million cases worldwide. Current therapeutic approaches are limited by toxicity, resistance and cost. N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT), an enzyme ubiquitous and essential in all eukaryotes, has been validated via genetic and pharmacological methods as a promising antileishmanial target. Here we describe a comprehensive structure activity relationship study of a thienopyrimidine series previously identified in a high throughput screen against Leishmania NMT, across 68 compounds in enzyme- and cell-based assay formats. Using a chemical tagging target engagement biomarker assay we identify the first inhibitor in this series with on-target NMT activity in leishmania parasites. Furthermore, crystal structure analyses of 12 derivatives in complex with Leishmania major NMT revealed key factors important for future structure-guided optimization delivering IMP-105 (43), a compound with modest activity against L. donovani intracellular amastigotes and excellent selectivity (>660-fold) for Leishmania NMT over human NMTs.

Journal article

Panyain N, Godinat A, Lanyon-Hogg T, Lachiondo-Ortega S, Will EJ, Soudy C, Mondal M, Mason K, Elkhalifa S, Smith L, Harrigan JA, Tate EWet al., 2020, Discovery of a potent and selective covalent inhibitor and activity-based probe for the deubiquitylating enzyme UCHL1, with anti-fibrotic activity, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol: 142, Pages: 12020-12026, ISSN: 0002-7863

Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitylating enzyme which is proposed as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegeneration, cancer, and liver and lung fibrosis. Herein we report the discovery of the most potent and selective UCHL1 probe (IMP-1710) to date based on a covalent inhibitor scaffold and apply this probe to identify and quantify target proteins in intact human cells. IMP-1710 stereoselectively labels the catalytic cysteine of UCHL1 at low nanomolar concentration in cells. We further demonstrate that potent and selective UCHL1 inhibitors block pro-fibrotic responses in a cellular model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, supporting the potential of UCHL1 as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases.

Journal article

Alzahofi N, Welz T, Robinson CL, Page EL, Briggs DA, Stainthorp AK, Reekes J, Elbe DA, Straub F, Kallemeijn WW, Tate EW, Goff PS, Sviderskaya E, Cantero M, Montoliu L, Nedelec F, Miles AK, Bailly M, Kerkhoff E, Hume ANet al., 2020, Rab27a co-ordinates actin-dependent transport by controlling organelle-associated motors and track assembly proteins, NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2041-1723

Journal article

Broncel M, Dominicus C, Vigetti L, Nofal SD, Bartlett EJ, Touquet B, Hunt A, Wallbank BA, Federico S, Matthews S, Young JC, Tate EW, Tardieux I, Treeck Met al., 2020, Profiling of myristoylation in Toxoplasma gondii reveals an N-myristoylated protein important for host cell penetration, ELIFE, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2050-084X

Journal article

Maneiro M, Forte N, Shchepinova MM, Kounde CS, Chudasama V, Baker JR, Tate EWet al., 2020, Antibody–PROTAC conjugates enable HER2-dependent targeted protein degradation of BRD4, ACS Chemical Biology, Vol: 15, Pages: 1306-1312, ISSN: 1554-8929

Targeting protein degradation with Proteolysis-Targeting Chimeras (PROTACs) is an area of great current interest in drug discovery. Nevertheless, although the high effectiveness of PROTACs against a wide variety of targets has been established, most degraders reported to date display limited intrinsic tissue selectivity and do not discriminate between cells of different types. Here, we describe a strategy for selective protein degradation in a specific cell type. We report the design and synthesis of a trastuzumab-PROTAC conjugate (Ab-PROTAC 3) in which E3 ligase-directed degrader activity is caged with an antibody linker which can be hydrolyzed following antibody–PROTAC internalization, releasing the active PROTAC and inducing catalytic protein degradation. We show that 3 selectively targets bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) for degradation only in HER2 positive breast cancer cell lines, while sparing HER2 negative cells. Using live cell confocal microscopy, we show internalization and lysosomal trafficking of the conjugate specifically in HER2 positive cells, leading to the release of active PROTAC in quantities sufficient to induce potent BRD4 degradation. These studies demonstrate proof-of-concept for tissue-specific BRD4 degradation, overcoming limitations of PROTAC selectivity, with significant potential for application to novel targets.

Journal article

Saunders CN, Cota E, Baum J, Tate EWet al., 2020, Peptide probes for Plasmodium falciparum MyoA tail interacting protein (MTIP): exploring the druggability of the malaria parasite motor complex, ACS Chemical Biology, Vol: 15, Pages: 1313-1320, ISSN: 1554-8929

Malaria remains an endemic tropical disease, and the emergence of Plasmodium falciparum parasites resistant to current front-line medicines means that new therapeutic targets are required. The Plasmodium glideosome is a multiprotein complex thought to be essential for efficient host red blood cell invasion. At its core is a myosin motor, Myosin A (MyoA), which provides most of the force required for parasite invasion. Here, we report the design and development of improved peptide-based probes for the anchor point of MyoA, the P. falciparum MyoA tail interacting protein (PfMTIP). These probes combine low nanomolar binding affinity with significantly enhanced cell penetration and demonstrable competitive target engagement with native PfMTIP through a combination of Western blot and chemical proteomics. These results provide new insights into the potential druggability of the MTIP/MyoA interaction and a basis for the future design of inhibitors.

Journal article

Simoes BM, Santiago-Gomez A, Chiodo C, Moreira T, Conole D, Lovell S, Alferez D, Eyre R, Spence K, Sarmiento-Castro A, Kohler B, Morisset L, Lanzino M, Ando S, Marangoni E, Sims AH, Tate EW, Howell SJ, Clarke RBet al., 2020, Targeting STAT3 signaling using stabilised sulforaphane (SFX-01) inhibits endocrine resistant stem-like cells in ER-positive breast cancer, ONCOGENE, Vol: 39, Pages: 4896-4908, ISSN: 0950-9232

Journal article

Fedoryshchak R, Ocasio C, Strutton B, Mattocks J, Corran A, Tate Eet al., 2020, Wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors: on-target antifungal activity and an unusual metabolic defense mechanism, RSC Chemical Biology, Vol: 1, Pages: 68-78, ISSN: 1747-1613

Zymoseptoria tritici is the causative agent of Septoria tritici blotch (STB), which costs billions of dollars annually to major wheat-producing countries in terms of both fungicide use and crop loss. Agricultural pathogenic fungi have acquired resistance to most commercially available fungicide classes, and the rate of discovery and development of new fungicides has stalled, demanding new approaches and insights. Here we investigate a potential mechanism of targeting an important wheat pathogen Z. tritici via inhibition of N-myristoyltransferase (NMT). We characterize Z. tritici NMT biochemically for the first time, profile the in vivo Z. tritici myristoylated proteome and identify and validate the first Z. tritici NMT inhibitors. Proteomic investigation of the downstream effects of NMT inhibition identified an unusual and novel mechanism of defense against chemical toxicity in Z. tritici through the application of comparative bioinformatics to deconvolute function from the previously largely unannotated Z. tritici proteome. Research into novel fungicidal modes-of-action is essential to satisfy an urgent unmet need for novel fungicide targets, and we anticipate that this study will serve as a useful proteomics and bioinformatics resource for researchers studying Z. tritici.

Journal article

Anderson DP, Benns HJ, Tate EW, Child MAet al., 2020, CRISPR-TAPE: protein-centricCRISPRguide design for targeted proteome engineering, MOLECULAR SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1744-4292

Journal article

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