Imperial College London

DrErikvan Sebille

Faculty of Natural SciencesThe Grantham Institute for Climate Change

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

e.van-sebille Website

 
 
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Location

 

Sherfield BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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164 results found

Kehl C, Fischer RPB, van Sebille E, 2021, PRACTICES, PITFALLS AND GUIDELINES IN VISUALISING LAGRANGIAN OCEAN ANALYSES, ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, Vol: V-4-2021, Pages: 217-224

<jats:p>Abstract. The Lagrangian analysis of particulate matter, biota and drifters, which are dispersed by turbulent fluid currents, is a cornerstone of oceanographic studies, covering diverse study objectives. The results of Lagrangian simulations and observations is predominantly visualised by means of easy-access plotting interfaces and simple presentation techniques. We analysed over 50 publications from the years 2010–2020 with respect to their visual design to deduce common visualisation practices in the domain. Individual figures are analysed towards adherence to visualisation best-practices, algebraic visualisation guidelines and the IPCC visual style guide. In this article, we present the resulting best-practices and common pitfalls in the design of Lagrangian ocean visualisations. Based on this visual study, we highlight that raising awareness of established visual guidelines may have a higher impact on improving the visual quality of publications in oceanography than the vigorous development of more general-purpose visualisation tools. </jats:p>

Journal article

Onink V, Jongedijk CE, Hoffman MJ, van Sebille E, Laufkoetter Cet al., 2021, Global simulations of marine plastic transport show plastic trapping in coastal zones, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1748-9326

Journal article

Morales-Caselles C, Viejo J, Marti E, Gonzalez-Fernandez D, Pragnell-Raasch H, Ignacio Gonzalez-Gordillo J, Montero E, Arroyo GM, Hanke G, Salvo VS, Basurko OC, Mallos N, Lebreton L, Echevarria F, van Emmerik T, Duarte CM, Galvez JA, van Sebille E, Galgani F, Garcia CM, Ross PS, Bartual A, Ioakeimidis C, Markalain G, Isobe A, Cozar Aet al., 2021, An inshore-offshore sorting system revealed from global classification of ocean litter, NATURE SUSTAINABILITY, Vol: 4, Pages: 484-493, ISSN: 2398-9629

Journal article

Kaandorp MLA, Dijkstra HA, van Sebille E, 2021, Modelling size distributions of marine plastics under the influence of continuous cascading fragmentation, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1748-9326

Journal article

Lobelle D, Kooi M, Koelmans AA, Laufkotter C, Jongedijk CE, Kehl C, van Sebille Eet al., 2021, Global Modeled Sinking Characteristics of Biofouled Microplastic, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, Vol: 126, ISSN: 2169-9275

Journal article

de la Fuente R, Drotos G, Hernandez-Garcia E, Lopez C, van Sebille Eet al., 2021, Sinking microplastics in the water column: simulations in the Mediterranean Sea, OCEAN SCIENCE, Vol: 17, Pages: 431-453, ISSN: 1812-0784

Journal article

de la Fuente R, Drótos G, Hernández-García E, López C, van Sebille Eet al., 2021, Sinking microplastics in the water column: simulations in the Mediterranean Sea, Ocean Science, Vol: 17, Pages: 431-453

<jats:p>Abstract. We study the vertical dispersion and distribution of negativelybuoyant rigid microplastics within a realistic circulationmodel of the Mediterranean sea. We first propose an equationdescribing their idealized dynamics. In that framework, weevaluate the importance of some relevant physical effects (inertia, Coriolis force, small-scale turbulence andvariable seawater density), and we bound the relative error ofsimplifying the dynamics to a constant sinking velocity addedto a large-scale velocity field. We then calculate the amountand vertical distribution of microplastic particles on thewater column of the open ocean if their release from the seasurface is continuous at rates compatible with observations inthe Mediterranean. The vertical distribution is found to bealmost uniform with depth for the majority of ourparameter range. Transient distributions from flash releasesreveal a non-Gaussian character of the dispersion and variousdiffusion laws, both normal and anomalous. The origin of thesebehaviors is explored in terms of horizontal and vertical floworganization. </jats:p>

Journal article

Wichmann D, Kehl C, Dijkstra HA, van Sebille Eet al., 2021, Ordering of trajectories reveals hierarchical finite-time coherent sets in Lagrangian particle data: detecting Agulhas rings in the South Atlantic Ocean, NONLINEAR PROCESSES IN GEOPHYSICS, Vol: 28, Pages: 43-59, ISSN: 1023-5809

Journal article

Reijnders D, van Leeuwen EJ, van Sebille E, 2021, Ocean Surface Connectivity in the Arctic: Capabilities and Caveats of Community Detection in Lagrangian Flow Networks, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, Vol: 126, ISSN: 2169-9275

Journal article

Turney CSM, Jones RT, McKay NP, van Sebille E, Thomas ZA, Hillenbrand C-D, Fogwill CJet al., 2020, A global mean sea surface temperature dataset for the Last Interglacial (129-116 ka) and contribution of thermal expansion to sea level change, EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE DATA, Vol: 12, Pages: 3341-3356, ISSN: 1866-3508

Journal article

Alsina JM, Jongedijk CE, van Sebille E, 2020, Laboratory Measurements of the Wave-Induced Motion of Plastic Particles: Influence of Wave Period, Plastic Size and Plastic Density, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, Vol: 125, ISSN: 2169-9275

Journal article

Dammer LK, de Nooijer L, van Sebille E, Haak JG, Reichart G-Jet al., 2020, Evaluation of oxygen isotopes and trace elements in planktonic foraminifera from the Mediterranean Sea as recorders of seawater oxygen isotopes and salinity, CLIMATE OF THE PAST, Vol: 16, Pages: 2401-2414, ISSN: 1814-9324

Journal article

Wichmann D, Kehl C, Dijkstra HA, van Sebille Eet al., 2020, Detecting flow features in scarce trajectory data using networks derived from symbolic itineraries: an application to surface drifters in the North Atlantic, NONLINEAR PROCESSES IN GEOPHYSICS, Vol: 27, Pages: 501-518, ISSN: 1023-5809

Journal article

van der Mheen M, van Sebille E, Pattiaratchi C, 2020, Beaching patterns of plastic debris along the Indian Ocean rim, OCEAN SCIENCE, Vol: 16, Pages: 1317-1336, ISSN: 1812-0784

Journal article

Kaandorp MLA, Dijkstra HA, van Sebille E, 2020, Closing the Mediterranean Marine Floating Plastic Mass Budget: Inverse Modeling of Sources and Sinks, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Vol: 54, Pages: 11980-11989, ISSN: 0013-936X

Journal article

Kontopoulos D, van Sebille E, Lange M, Yvon-Durocher G, Barraclough TG, Pawar Set al., 2020, Phytoplankton thermal responses adapt in the absence of hard thermodynamic constraints, Evolution, Vol: 74, Pages: 775-790, ISSN: 0014-3820

To better predict how populations and communities respond to climatic temperature variation, it is necessary to understand how the shape of the response of fitness‐related rates to temperature evolves (the thermal performance curve). Currently, there is disagreement about the extent to which the evolution of thermal performance curves is constrained. One school of thought has argued for the prevalence of thermodynamic constraints through enzyme kinetics, whereas another argues that adaptation can—at least partly—overcome such constraints. To shed further light on this debate, we perform a phylogenetic meta‐analysis of the thermal performance curves of growth rate of phytoplankton—a globally important functional group—, controlling for environmental effects (habitat type and thermal regime). We find that thermodynamic constraints have a minor influence on the shape of the curve. In particular, we detect a very weak increase of maximum performance with the temperature at which the curve peaks, suggesting a weak “hotter‐is‐better” constraint. Also, instead of a constant thermal sensitivity of growth across species, as might be expected from strong constraints, we find that all aspects of the thermal performance curve evolve along the phylogeny. Our results suggest that phytoplankton thermal performance curves adapt to thermal environments largely in the absence of hard thermodynamic constraints.

Journal article

Jutzcler M, Marsh R, van Sebille E, Mittal T, Carey RJ, Fauria KE, Manga M, McPhie Jet al., 2020, Ongoing Dispersal of the 7 August 2019 Pumice Raft From the Tonga Arc in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean, GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 47, ISSN: 0094-8276

Journal article

Sterl MF, Delandmeter P, van Sebille E, 2020, Influence of Barotropic Tidal Currents on Transport and Accumulation of Floating Microplastics in the Global Open Ocean, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, Vol: 125, ISSN: 2169-9275

Journal article

van Sebille E, Aliani S, Law KL, Maximenko N, Alsina JM, Bagaev A, Bergmann M, Chapron B, Chubarenko I, Cozar A, Delandmeter P, Egger M, Fox-Kemper B, Garaba SP, Goddijn-Murphy L, Hardesty BD, Hoffman MJ, Isobe A, Jongedijk CE, Kaandorp MLA, Khatmullina L, Koelmans AA, Kukulka T, Laufkotter C, Lebreton L, Lobelle D, Maes C, Martinez-Vicente V, Maqueda MAM, Poulain-Zarcos M, Rodriguez E, Ryan PG, Shanks AL, Shim WJ, Suaria G, Thiel M, van den Bremer TS, Wichmann Det al., 2020, The physical oceanography of the transport of floating marine debris, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1748-9326

Journal article

Wichmann D, Delandmeter P, Dijkstra HA, van Sebille Eet al., 2019, Mixing of passive tracers at the ocean surface and its implications for plastic transport modelling, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 1, ISSN: 2515-7620

Journal article

van Sebille E, Delandmeter P, Schofield J, Hardesty BD, Jones J, Donnelly Aet al., 2019, Basin-scale sources and pathways of microplastic that ends up in the Galapagos Archipelago, OCEAN SCIENCE, Vol: 15, Pages: 1341-1349, ISSN: 1812-0784

Journal article

Escalle L, Scutt Phillips J, Brownjohn M, Brouwer S, Sen Gupta A, Van Sebille E, Hampton J, Pilling Get al., 2019, Environmental versus operational drivers of drifting FAD beaching in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean, Scientific Reports, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2045-2322

In an effort to increase purse seine fishing efficiency for tropical tunas, over 30,000 drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (dFADs) are deployed every year by fishers in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO). The use of dFADs also impacts ecosystems, in particular through marine pollution and dFAD beaching. This paper presents the first estimate of dFAD beaching events in the WCPO (>1300 in 2016-2017) and their distribution. Lagrangian simulations of virtual dFADs, released subject to contrasting deployment distributions, help us determine the relative importance of operational versus environmental drivers of dFADs drifting to beaching areas. The highest levels of beaching, occurring on Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands, are likely a result of the prevailing westward oceanic circulation and subsequent local processes driving dFADs towards land. Similarly, high beaching rates in Tuvalu appear to be due to the general circulation of the WCPO. In contrast, beaching in Kiribati Gilbert Islands appear to be more strongly related to dFAD deployment strategy. These findings indicate that reducing beaching events via changes in deployment locations may be difficult. As such, management approaches combining dFAD deployment limits, the use of biodegradable dFADs, recoveries at-sea close to sensitive areas and/or beached dFAD removal should be considered.

Journal article

Maximenko N, Corradi P, Law KL, Van Sebille E, Garaba SP, Lampitt RS, Galgani F, Martinez-Vicente V, Goddijn-Murphy L, Veiga JM, Thompson RC, Maes C, Moller D, Loscher CR, Addamo AM, Lamson MR, Centurioni LR, Posth NR, Lumpkin R, Vinci M, Martins AM, Pieper CD, Isobe A, Hanke G, Edwards M, Chubarenko IP, Rodriguez E, Aliani S, Arias M, Asner GP, Brosich A, Carlton JT, Chao Y, Cook A-M, Cundy AB, Galloway TS, Giorgetti A, Goni GJ, Guichoux Y, Haram LE, Hardesty BD, Holdsworth N, Lebreton L, Leslie HA, Macadam-Somer I, Mace T, Manuel M, Marsh R, Martinez E, Mayor DJ, Le Moigne M, Jack MEM, Mowlem MC, Obbard RW, Pabortsava K, Robberson B, Rotaru A-E, Ruiz GM, Teresa Spedicato M, Thiel M, Turra A, Wilcox Cet al., 2019, Toward the integrated marine debris observing system, Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2296-7745

Plastics and other artificial materials pose new risks to the health of the ocean. Anthropogenic debris travels across large distances and is ubiquitous in the water and on shorelines, yet, observations of its sources, composition, pathways, and distributions in the ocean are very sparse and inaccurate. Total amounts of plastics and other man-made debris in the ocean and on the shore, temporal trends in these amounts under exponentially increasing production, as well as degradation processes, vertical fluxes, and time scales are largely unknown. Present ocean circulation models are not able to accurately simulate drift of debris because of its complex hydrodynamics. In this paper we discuss the structure of the future integrated marine debris observing system (IMDOS) that is required to provide long-term monitoring of the state of this anthropogenic pollution and support operational activities to mitigate impacts on the ecosystem and on the safety of maritime activity. The proposed observing system integrates remote sensing and in situ observations. Also, models are used to optimize the design of the system and, in turn, they will be gradually improved using the products of the system. Remote sensing technologies will provide spatially coherent coverage and consistent surveying time series at local to global scale. Optical sensors, including high-resolution imaging, multi- and hyperspectral, fluorescence, and Raman technologies, as well as SAR will be used to measure different types of debris. They will be implemented in a variety of platforms, from hand-held tools to ship-, buoy-, aircraft-, and satellite-based sensors. A network of in situ observations, including reports from volunteers, citizen scientists and ships of opportunity, will be developed to provide data for calibration/validation of remote sensors and to monitor the spread of plastic pollution and other marine debris. IMDOS will interact with other observing systems monitoring physical, chemical, and b

Journal article

Delandmeter P, van Sebille E, 2019, The Parcels v2.0 Lagrangian framework: new field interpolation schemes, GEOSCIENTIFIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 12, Pages: 3571-3584, ISSN: 1991-959X

Journal article

Compa M, Alomar C, Wilcox C, van Sebille E, Lebreton L, Hardesty BD, Deudero Set al., 2019, Risk assessment of plastic pollution on marine diversity in the Mediterranean Sea, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 678, Pages: 188-196, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Wichmann D, Delandmeter P, van Sebille E, 2019, Influence of Near-Surface Currents on the Global Dispersal of Marine Microplastic, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, Vol: 124, Pages: 6086-6096, ISSN: 2169-9275

Journal article

Nooteboom PD, Bijl PK, Sebille E, Heydt AS, Dijkstra HAet al., 2019, Transport bias by ocean currents in sedimentary microplankton assemblages: implications for paleoceanographic reconstructions, Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, Vol: 34, Pages: 1178-1194, ISSN: 2572-4517

Microfossils from plankton are used for paleoceanographic reconstructions. An often‐made assumption in quantitative microplankton‐based paleoceanographic reconstructions is that sedimentary assemblages represent conditions of the directly overlying surface water. However, any immobile particle sinking down the water column is subjected to transport by three‐dimensional currents, which results in a lateral relocation along transport. We model dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) transport in a high‐resolution (0.1° horizontally) global model of the present‐day ocean and compare ocean conditions in the simulated origin of sedimentary particles to that in the directly overlying water. We find that the assumption that sedimentary particles represent the overlying surface waters is in most regions not valid. The bias induced by dinocyst transport depends on ocean current strength and direction, aggregation of particles which could increase the sinking speed, and the sediment sample depth. By using realistic sinking speeds of dinocysts and aggregates, extreme biases up to approximately ±16 °C warmer or ±4 PSU saltier are found, while other regions show lower bias from particle transport. Our model results provide a way to mechanistically and statistically explain the unexpected occurrences of some dinocyst species outside of their “normal” occurrence region, such as the northerly occurrence of the allegedly sea‐ice‐affiliated dinocyst Selenopemphix antarctica. Exclusion of such outlier occurrences will yield better constrained ecological affinites for dinocyst species, which has implications for microfossil‐based quantitative and qualitative proxies for paleoceanographic conditions. We recommend paleoceanographers to a priori evaluate the (paleo)water depth, oceanographic setting, current strength, and particle aggregation probability for their sedimentary microplankton assemblages.

Journal article

Boas ABV, Ardhuin F, Ayet A, Bourassa MA, Brandt P, Chapron B, Cornuelle BD, Farrar JT, Fewings MR, Fox-Kemper B, Gille ST, Gommenginger C, Heimbach P, Hell MC, Li Q, Mazloff MR, Merrifield ST, Mouche A, Rio MH, Rodriguez E, Shutler JD, Subramanian AC, Terrill EJ, Tsamados M, Ubelmann C, van Sebille Eet al., 2019, Integrated observations of global surface winds, currents, and waves: requirements and challenges for the next decade, Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol: 6, Pages: 1-34, ISSN: 2296-7745

Ocean surface winds, currents, and waves play a crucial role in exchanges of momentum, energy, heat, freshwater, gases, and other tracers between the ocean, atmosphere, and ice. Despite surface waves being strongly coupled to the upper ocean circulation and the overlying atmosphere, efforts to improve ocean, atmospheric, and wave observations and models have evolved somewhat independently. From an observational point of view, community efforts to bridge this gap have led to proposals for satellite Doppler oceanography mission concepts, which could provide unprecedented measurements of absolute surface velocity and directional wave spectrum at global scales. This paper reviews the present state of observations of surface winds, currents, and waves, and it outlines observational gaps that limit our current understanding of coupled processes that happen at the air-sea-ice interface. A significant challenge for the coming decade of wind, current, and wave observations will come in combining and interpreting measurements from (a) wave-buoys and high-frequency radars in coastal regions, (b) surface drifters and wave-enabled drifters in the open-ocean, marginal ice zones, and wave-current interaction “hot-spots,” and (c) simultaneous measurements of absolute surface currents, ocean surface wind vector, and directional wave spectrum from Doppler satellite sensors.

Journal article

De Frond HL, van Sebille E, Parnis JM, Diamond ML, Mallos N, Kingsbury T, Rochman CMet al., 2019, Estimating the Mass of Chemicals Associated with Ocean Plastic Pollution to Inform Mitigation Efforts, INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT, Vol: 15, Pages: 596-606, ISSN: 1551-3777

Journal article

van Sebille E, Delandmeter P, Lange M, Rath W, Scutt Phillips J, Simnator101, pdnooteboom, Kronborg J, Thomas-95, Wichmann D, Tarshish N, Busecke J, Edwards R, Sterl M, Walbridge S, Kaandorp M, Hart-Davis, Miron P, Glissenaar I, Vettoretti G, Ham Det al., 2019, OceanParcels/parcels: Parcels v2.0.0: a Lagrangian Ocean Analysis tool for the petascale age

Parcels v2.0.0 builds on previous versions v2.0.0.beta and v2.0.0.beta2. It's the release which is fully described in the paper The Parcels v2.0 Lagrangian framework: new field interpolation schemes, by Delandmeter and van Sebille, 2019, GMD.The major changes of v2.0.0 compared to v1.1.1 are1) The order of arguments for Field interpolation has changed. This is now field[time, depth, lat, lon], which is consistent with the dimension order in which data is stored in the field.data numpy array (#503 and #276).2) The dt argument has been dropped from Kernel definitions, so that the only arguments allowed in a Kernel are def kernelfunc(fieldset, particle, time) (#503)3) Interpolation for C-grids is now done in a fluxes framework, instead of a velocity framework (#499 and #494).4) Interpolation for B-grids (#573)5) Support for np.float64 accuracy of particle locations. This can be set using the lonlatdepth_dtype argument in ParticleSet construction. Default is np.float64 for C-grids, and np.float32 for all other grids (#552 and #557)Note also a number of other minor development:See v2.0.0.betaSee v2.0.0.beta2Unpinning netcdf4 1.4.1 (#597)Numerous bug fixes

Software

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