Imperial College London

DrFiratGuder

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Bioengineering

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

f.guder

 
 
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Location

 

Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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46 results found

Cotur Y, Guder F, Kozlov A, Olenik S, Tanriverdi U, Asfour T, Bruyns-Haylett M, Gonzalez-Macia L, Lee HSet al., 2022, Bioinspired Stretchable Transducer for Wearable Continuous Monitoring of Respiratory Patterns in Humans and Animals, Advanced Materials, ISSN: 0935-9648

Journal article

Gil Rosa B, Akingbade OE, Guo X, Gonzalez-Macia L, Crone MA, Cameron LP, Freemont P, Choy K-L, Güder F, Yeatman E, Sharp DJ, Li Bet al., 2022, Multiplexed immunosensors for point-of-care diagnostic applications, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol: 203, ISSN: 0956-5663

Accurate, reliable, and cost-effective immunosensors are clinically important for the early diagnosis and monitoring of progressive diseases, and multiplexed sensing is a promising strategy for the next generation of diagnostics. This strategy allows for the simultaneous detection and quantification of multiple biomarkers with significantly enhanced reproducibility and reliability, whilst requiring smaller sample volumes, fewer materials, and shorter average analysis time for individual biomarkers than individual tests. In this opinionated review, we compare different techniques for the development of multiplexed immunosensors. We review the state-of-the-art approaches in the field of multiplexed immunosensors using electrical, electrochemical, and optical methods. The barriers that prevent translating this sensing strategy into clinics are outlined together with the potential solutions. We also share our vision on how multiplexed immunosensors will continue their evolution in the coming years.

Journal article

Altay A, Learney R, Guder F, Dincer Cet al., 2022, Sensors in blockchain, TRENDS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY, Vol: 40, Pages: 141-144, ISSN: 0167-7799

Journal article

Grell M, Barandun G, Asfour T, Kasimatis M, Collins ASP, Wang J, Guder Fet al., 2021, Point-of-use sensors and machine learning enable low-cost determination of soil nitrogen, Nature Food, Vol: 2, Pages: 981-989, ISSN: 2662-1355

Overfertilization with nitrogen fertilizers has damaged the environment and health of soil, but standard laboratory testing of soil to determine the levels of nitrogen (mainly NH4+ and NO3-) is not performed regularly. Here, we demonstrate that Point-of-Use measurements of NH4+, combined with soil conductivity, pH, easily accessible weather and timing data, allow instantaneous prediction of levels of NO3- in soil (R2 = 0.70) using a machine learning model. A long short-term memory recurrent neural network model can also be used to predict levels of NH4+ and NO3- up to 12 days into the future from a single measurement at day one, with R2NH4+= 0.60 and R2NO3-= 0.70, for unseen weather conditions. Our machine learning-based approach eliminates the need of using dedicated instruments to determine the levels of NO3- in soil. Nitrogenous soil nutrients can be determined and predicted with enough accuracy to forecast the impact of climate on fertilization planning, and tune timing for crop requirements, reducing overfertilization while improving crop yields.

Journal article

Wan K, Liu Y, Santagiuliana G, Barandun G, Taroni Junior P, Guder F, Bastiaansen CW, Baxendale M, Fenwick O, Papageorgiou DG, Krause S, Zhang H, Bilotti Eet al., 2021, Self-powered ultrasensitive and highly stretchable temperature-strain sensing composite yarns, Materials Horizons, Vol: 8, Pages: 2513-2519, ISSN: 2051-6355

With the emergence of stretchable/wearable devices, functions, such as sensing, energy storage/harvesting, and electrical conduction, should ideally be carried out by a single material, while retaining its ability to withstand large elastic deformations, to create compact, functionally-integrated and autonomous systems. A new class of trimodal, stretchable yarn-based transducer formed by coating commercially available Lycra® yarns with PEDOT:PSS is presented. The material developed can sense strain (first mode), and temperature (second mode) and can power itself thermoelectrically (third mode), eliminating the need for an external power-supply. The yarns were extensively characterized and obtained an ultrahigh (gauge factor ∼3.6 × 105, at 10–20% strain) and tunable (up to about 2 orders of magnitude) strain sensitivity together with a very high strain-at-break point (up to ∼1000%). These PEDOT:PSS-Lycra yarns also exhibited stable thermoelectric behavior (Seebeck coefficient of 15 μV K−1), which was exploited both for temperature sensing and self-powering (∼0.5 μW, for a 10-couple module at ΔT ∼ 95 K). The produced material has potential to be interfaced with microcontroller-based systems to create internet-enabled, internet-of-things type devices in a variety of form factors.

Journal article

Brophy K, Davies S, Olenik S, Cotur Y, Ming D, Van Zalk N, O'Hare D, Guder F, Yetisen AKet al., 2021, The future of wearable technologies, Briefing Paper

Report

Jiang N, Tansukawat ND, Gonzalez-Macia L, Ates HC, Dincer C, Guder F, Tasoglu S, Yetisen AKet al., 2021, Low-cost optical assays for point-of-care diagnosis in resource-limited settings, ACS Sensors, Vol: 6, Pages: 2108-2124, ISSN: 2379-3694

Readily deployable, low-cost point-of-care medical devices such as lateral flow assays (LFAs), microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs), and microfluidic thread-based analytical devices (μTADs) are urgently needed in resource-poor settings. Governed by the ASSURED criteria (affordable, sensitive, specific, user-friendly, rapid and robust, equipment-free, and deliverability) set by the World Health Organization, these reliable platforms can screen a myriad of chemical and biological analytes including viruses, bacteria, proteins, electrolytes, and narcotics. The Ebola epidemic in 2014 and the ongoing pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 have exemplified the ever-increasing importance of timely diagnostics to limit the spread of diseases. This review provides a comprehensive survey of LFAs, μPADs, and μTADs that can be deployed in resource-limited settings. The subsequent commercialization of these technologies will benefit the public health, especially in areas where access to healthcare is limited.

Journal article

Olenik S, Lee HS, Guder F, 2021, The future of near-field communication-based wireless sensing, NATURE REVIEWS MATERIALS, Vol: 6, Pages: 286-288, ISSN: 2058-8437

Journal article

Ates HC, Brunauer A, von Stetten F, Urban GA, Guder F, Merkoci A, Fruh SM, Dincer Cet al., 2021, Integrated Devices for Non-Invasive Diagnostics, ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, Vol: 31, ISSN: 1616-301X

Journal article

Ates HC, Yetisen AK, Guder F, Dincer Cet al., 2021, Wearable devices for the detection of COVID-19, NATURE ELECTRONICS, Vol: 4, Pages: 13-14, ISSN: 2520-1131

Journal article

Nunez-Bajo E, Collins ASP, Kasimatis M, Cotur Y, Asfour T, Tanriverdi U, Grell M, Kaisti M, Senesi G, Stevenson K, Gueder Fet al., 2020, Publisher Correction: Disposable silicon-based all-in-one micro-qPCR for rapid on-site detection of pathogens., Nature Communications, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 2041-1723

Journal article

Nunez-Bajo E, Collins ASP, Kasimatis M, Cotur Y, Asfour T, Grell M, Kaisti M, Senesi G, Stevenson K, Guder F, Tanriverdi Uet al., 2020, Disposable silicon-based all-in-one micro-qPCR for rapid on-site detection of pathogens, Nature Communications, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2041-1723

Rapid screening and low-cost diagnosis play a crucial role in choosing the correct course of intervention when dealing with highly infectious pathogens. This is especially important if the disease-causing agent has no effective treatment, such as the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, and shows no or similar symptoms to other common infections. Here, we report a disposable silicon-based integrated Point-of-Need transducer (TriSilix) for real-time quantitative detection of pathogen-specific sequences of nucleic acids. TriSilix can be produced at wafer-scale in a standard laboratory (37 chips of 10 × 10 × 0.65 mm in size can be produced in 7 h, costing ~0.35 USD per device). We are able to quantitatively detect a 563 bp fragment of genomic DNA of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis through real-time PCR with a limit-of-detection of 20 fg, equivalent to a single bacterium, at the 35th cycle. Using TriSilix, we also detect the cDNA from SARS-CoV-2 (1 pg) with high specificity against SARS-CoV (2003).

Journal article

Li B, Tan H, Jenkins D, Srinivasa Raghavan V, Gil Rosa B, Guder F, Pan G, Yeatman E, Sharp Det al., 2020, Clinical detection of neurodegenerative blood biomarkers using graphene immunosensor, Carbon, Vol: 168, Pages: 144-162, ISSN: 0008-6223

Accurate detection of blood biomarkers related to neurodegenerative diseases could provide a shortcut to identifying early stage patients before the onset of symptoms. The specificity, selectivity and operational requirements of the current technologies, however, preclude their use in the primary clinical setting for early detection. Graphene, an emerging 2D nanomaterial, is a promising candidate for biosensing which has the potential to meet the performance requirements and enable cost-effective, portable and rapid diagnosis. In this review, we compare graphene-based immunosensing technologies with conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and cutting-edge single molecule array techniques for the detection of blood-based neurodegenerative biomarkers. We cover the progress in electrical, electrochemical and optical graphene-based immunosensors and outline the barriers that slow or prevent the adoption of this emerging technology in primary clinical settings. We also highlight the possible solutions to overcome these barriers with an outlook on the future of the promising, graphene immunosensor technology.

Journal article

Cotur Y, Kasimatis M, Olenik S, Kaisti M, Gergiou C, Guder Fet al., 2020, Stretchable composite acoustic transducer for wearable monitoring of vital signs, Advanced Functional Materials, Vol: 30, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 1616-301X

A highly flexible, stretchable, and mechanically robust low‐cost soft composite consisting of silicone polymers and water (or hydrogels) is reported. When combined with conventional acoustic transducers, the materials reported enable high performance real‐time monitoring of heart and respiratory patterns over layers of clothing (or furry skin of animals) without the need for direct contact with the skin. The approach enables an entirely new method of fabrication that involves encapsulation of water and hydrogels with silicones and exploits the ability of sound waves to travel through the body. The system proposed outperforms commercial, metal‐based stethoscopes for the auscultation of the heart when worn over clothing and is less susceptible to motion artefacts. The system both with human and furry animal subjects (i.e., dogs), primarily focusing on monitoring the heart, is tested; however, initial results on monitoring breathing are also presented. This work is especially important because it is the first demonstration of a stretchable sensor that is suitable for use with furry animals and does not require shaving of the animal for data acquisition.

Journal article

Kasimatis M, Nunez-Bajo E, Grell M, Cotur Y, Barandun G, Kim J-S, Guder Fet al., 2019, Monolithic solder-on nanoporous Si-Cu contacts for stretchable silicone composite sensors, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol: 11, Pages: 47577-47586, ISSN: 1944-8244

We report a method of creating solderable, mechanically robust, electrical contacts to interface (soft) silicone-based strain sensors with conventional (hard) solid-state electronics using a nanoporous Si-Cu composite. The Si-based solder-on electrical contact consists of a copper-plated nanoporous Si top surface formed through metal-assisted chemical etching and electroplating, and a smooth Si bottom surface which can be covalently bonded onto silicone-based strain sensors through plasma bonding. We investigated the mechanical and electrical properties of the contacts proposed under relevant ranges of mechanical stress for applications in physiological monitoring and rehabilitation. We also produced a series of proof-of-concept devices, including a wearable respiration monitor, leg band for exercise monitoring and Squeeze-ball for monitoring rehabilitation of patients with hand injuries or neurological disorders, to demonstrate the mechanical robustness and versatility of the technology developed, in real-world applications.

Journal article

Maier D, Laubender E, Basavanna A, Schumann S, Guder F, Urban G, Dincer Cet al., 2019, Toward Continuous Monitoring of Breath Biochemistry: A Paper-Based Wearable Sensor for Real-Time Hydrogen Peroxide Measurement in Simulated Breath, ACS Sensors, Vol: 4, Pages: 2945-2951, ISSN: 2379-3694

Exhaled breath contains a large amount of biochemical and physiological information concerning one’s health and provides an alternative route to noninvasive medical diagnosis of diseases. In the case of lung diseases, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important biomarker associated with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer and can be detected in exhaled breath. The current method of breath analysis involves condensation of exhaled breath, is not continuous or real time, and requires two separate and bulky devices, complicating the periodic or long-term monitoring of a patient. We report the first disposable paper-based electrochemical wearable sensor that can monitor exhaled H2O2 in artificial breath calibration-free and continuously, in real time, and can be integrated into a commercial respiratory mask for on-site testing of exhaled breath. To improve precision for sensing H2O2, we perform differential electrochemical measurement by amperometry in which screen-printed Prussian Blue-mediated and nonmediated carbon electrodes are used for differential analysis. We were able to measure H2O2 in simulated breath in a concentration-dependent manner in real time, confirming its functionality. This proposed system is versatile, and by modifying the chemistry of the sensing electrodes, our method of differential sensing can be extended to continuous monitoring of other analytes in exhaled breath.

Journal article

Dincer C, Bruch R, Rama E, Fernandez-Abedul MT, Merkoci A, Manz A, Urban G, Guder Fet al., 2019, Disposable sensors in diagnostics, food and environmental monitoring, Advanced Materials, Vol: 31, ISSN: 0935-9648

Disposable sensors are low‐cost and easy‐to‐use sensing devices intended for short‐term or rapid single‐point measurements. The growing demand for fast, accessible, and reliable information in a vastly connected world makes disposable sensors increasingly important. The areas of application for such devices are numerous, ranging from pharmaceutical, agricultural, environmental, forensic, and food sciences to wearables and clinical diagnostics, especially in resource‐limited settings. The capabilities of disposable sensors can extend beyond measuring traditional physical quantities (for example, temperature or pressure); they can provide critical chemical and biological information (chemo‐ and biosensors) that can be digitized and made available to users and centralized/decentralized facilities for data storage, remotely. These features could pave the way for new classes of low‐cost systems for health, food, and environmental monitoring that can democratize sensing across the globe. Here, a brief insight into the materials and basics of sensors (methods of transduction, molecular recognition, and amplification) is provided followed by a comprehensive and critical overview of the disposable sensors currently used for medical diagnostics, food, and environmental analysis. Finally, views on how the field of disposable sensing devices will continue its evolution are discussed, including the future trends, challenges, and opportunities.

Journal article

Barandun G, Soprani M, Naficy S, Grell M, Kasimatis M, Chiu KL, Ponzoni A, Guder Fet al., 2019, Cellulose fibers enable near zero-cost electrical sensing of water-soluble gases, ACS Sensors, Vol: 4, Pages: 1662-1669, ISSN: 2379-3694

We report an entirely new class of printed electrical gas sensors that are produced at near 'zero cost'. This technology exploits the intrinsic hygroscopic properties of cellulose fibers within paper; although it feels and looks dry, paper contains substantial amount of moisture, adsorbed from the environment, enabling the use of wet chemical methods for sensing without manually adding water to the substrate. The sensors exhibit high sensitivity to water soluble gases (e.g., limit-of-detection for NH3 <200 parts-per-billion) with a fast and reversible response. The sensors show comparable or better performance (especially at high relative humidity) than most commercial ammonia sensors at a fraction of their price (<$0.02 per sensor). We demonstrate that the sensors proposed can be integrated into food packaging to monitor freshness (to reduce food waste and plastic pollution) or implemented into near-field-communication tags to function as wireless, battery-less gas sensors that can be interrogated with smartphones.

Journal article

Ranunkel O, Guder F, Arora H, 2019, Soft robotic surrogate lung, ACS Applied Bio Materials, Vol: 2, Pages: 1490-1497, ISSN: 2576-6422

Previous artificial lung surrogates used hydrogels or balloon-like inflatable structures without reproducing the alveolar network or breathing action within the lung. A physiologically accurate, air-filled lung model inspired by soft robotics is presented. The model, soft robotic surrogate lung (SRSL), is composed of clusters of artificial alveoli made of platinum-cured silicone, with internal pathways for air flow. Mechanical tests in conjunction with full-field image and volume correlation techniques characterize the SRSL behavior. SRSLs enable both healthy and pathological lungs to be studied in idealized cases. Although simple in construction, the connected airways demonstrate clearly the importance of an inflatable network for capturing basic lung behavior (compared to more simplified lung surrogates). The SRSL highlights the potentially damaging nature of local defects caused by occlusion or overdistension (present in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The SRSL is developed as a potential upgrade to conventional surrogates used for injury risk predictions in trauma. The deformation of the SRSL is evaluated against blast trauma using a shock tube. The SRSL was compared to other conventional trauma surrogate materials and showed greatest similarity to lung tissue. The SRSL has the potential to complement conventional biomechanical studies and reduce animal use in basic biomechanics studies, where high severity protocols are used.

Journal article

Grell M, Dincer C, Le T, Lauri A, Nunez Bajo E, Kasimatis M, Barandun G, Maier S, Cass A, Guder Fet al., 2019, Autocatalytic metallization of fabrics using Si ink, for biosensors, batteries and energy harvesting, Advanced Functional Materials, Vol: 29, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1616-301X

Commercially available metal inks are mainly designed for planar substrates (for example, polyethylene terephthalate foils or ceramics), and they contain hydrophobic polymer binders that fill the pores in fabrics when printed, thus resulting in hydrophobic electrodes. Here, a low‐cost binder‐free method for the metallization of woven and nonwoven fabrics is presented that preserves the 3D structure and hydrophilicity of the substrate. Metals such as Au, Ag, and Pt are grown autocatalytically, using metal salts, inside the fibrous network of fabrics at room temperature in a two‐step process, with a water‐based silicon particle ink acting as precursor. Using this method, (patterned) metallized fabrics are being enabled to be produced with low electrical resistance (less than 3.5 Ω sq−1). In addition to fabrics, the method is also compatible with other 3D hydrophilic substrates such as nitrocellulose membranes. The versatility of this method is demonstrated by producing coil antennas for wireless energy harvesting, Ag–Zn batteries for energy storage, electrochemical biosensors for the detection of DNA/proteins, and as a substrate for optical sensing by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. In the future, this method of metallization may pave the way for new classes of high‐performance devices using low‐cost fabrics.

Journal article

Ainla A, Hamedi MM, Guder F, Whitesides GMet al., 2017, Electrical textile valves for paper microfluidics, Advanced Materials, Vol: 29, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 0935-9648

This paper describes electrically-activated fluidic valves that operate based on electrowetting through textiles. The valves are fabricated from electrically conductive, insulated, hydrophobic textiles, but the concept can be extended to other porous materials. When the valve is closed, the liquid cannot pass through the hydrophobic textile. Upon application of a potential (in the range of 100–1000 V) between the textile and the liquid, the valve opens and the liquid penetrates the textile. These valves actuate in less than 1 s, require low energy (≈27 µJ per actuation), and work with a variety of aqueous solutions, including those with low surface tension and those containing bioanalytes. They are bistable in function, and are, in a sense, the electrofluidic analog of thyristors. They can be integrated into paper microfluidic devices to make circuits that are capable of controlling liquid, including autonomous fluidic timers and fluidic logic.

Journal article

Hamedi MM, Ainla A, Guder F, Christodouleas DC, Teresa Fernandez-Abedul M, Whitesides GMet al., 2016, Integrating Electronics and Microfluidics on Paper, ADVANCED MATERIALS, Vol: 28, Pages: 5054-5063, ISSN: 0935-9648

Journal article

Guder F, Ainla A, Redston J, Mosadegh B, Glavan A, Martin TJ, Whitesides GMet al., 2016, Paper-based electrical respiration sensor, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Vol: 55, Pages: 5727-5732, ISSN: 1433-7851

Current methods of monitoring breathing require cumbersome, inconvenient, and often expensive devices; this requirement sets practical limitations on the frequency and duration of measurements. This article describes a paper-based moisture sensor that uses the hygroscopic character of paper (i.e. the ability of paper to adsorb water reversibly from the surrounding environment) to measure patterns and rate of respiration by converting the changes in humidity caused by cycles of inhalation and exhalation to electrical signals. The changing level of humidity that occurs in a cycle causes a corresponding change in the ionic conductivity of the sensor, which can be measured electrically. By combining the paper sensor with conventional electronics, data concerning respiration can be transmitted to a nearby smartphone or tablet computer for post-processing, and subsequently to a cloud server. This means of sensing provides a new, practical method of recording and analyzing patterns of breathing.

Journal article

Hamedi MM, Campbell VE, Rothemund P, Guder F, Christodouleas DC, Bloch J-F, Whitesides GMet al., 2016, Electrically Activated Paper Actuators, ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, Vol: 26, Pages: 2446-2453, ISSN: 1616-301X

Journal article

Boehler C, Guder F, Kuecuekbayrak UM, Zacharias M, Asplund Met al., 2016, A simple approach for molecular controlled release based on atomic layer deposition hybridized organic-inorganic layers, Scientific Reports, Vol: 6, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2045-2322

On-demand release of bioactive substances with high spatial and temporal control offers ground-breaking possibilities in the field of life sciences. However, available strategies for developing such release systems lack the possibility of combining efficient control over release with adequate storage capability in a reasonably compact system. In this study we present a new approach to target this deficiency by the introduction of a hybrid material. This organic-inorganic material was fabricated by atomic layer deposition of ZnO into thin films of polyethylene glycol, forming the carrier matrix for the substance to be released. Sub-surface growth mechanisms during this process converted the liquid polymer into a solid, yet water-soluble, phase. This layer permits extended storage for various substances within a single film of only a few micrometers in thickness and hence demands minimal space and complexity. Improved control over release of the model substance Fluorescein was achieved by coating the hybrid material with a conducting polymer film. Single dosage and repetitive dispensing from this system was demonstrated. Release was controlled by applying a bias potential of ±0.5 V to the polymer film enabling or respectively suppressing the expulsion of the model drug. In vitro tests showed excellent biocompatibility of the presented system.

Journal article

Glavan AC, Niu J, Chen Z, Gueder F, Cheng C-M, Liu D, Whitesides GMet al., 2016, Analytical Devices Based on Direct Synthesis of DNA on Paper, Analytical Chemistry, Vol: 88, Pages: 725-731, ISSN: 0003-2700

This paper addresses a growing need in clinical diagnostics for parallel, multiplex analysis of biomarkers from small biological samples. It describes a new procedure for assembling arrays of ssDNA and proteins on paper. This method starts with the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to paper and proceeds to assemble microzones of DNA-conjugated paper into arrays capable of simultaneously capturing DNA, DNA-conjugated protein antigens, and DNA-conjugated antibodies. The synthesis of ssDNA oligonucleotides on paper is convenient and effective with 32% of the oligonucleotides cleaved and eluted from the paper substrate being full-length by HPLC for a 32-mer. These ssDNA arrays can be used to detect fluorophore-linked DNA oligonucleotides in solution, and as the basis for DNA-directed assembly of arrays of DNA-conjugated capture antibodies on paper, detect protein antigens by sandwich ELISAs. Paper-anchored ssDNA arrays with different sequences can be used to assemble paper-based devices capable of detecting DNA and antibodies in the same device and enable simple microfluidic paper-based devices.

Journal article

Vierrath S, Gueder F, Menzel A, Hagner M, Zengerle R, Zacharias M, Thiele Set al., 2015, Enhancing the quality of the tomography of nanoporous materials for better understanding of polymer electrolyte fuel cell materials, JOURNAL OF POWER SOURCES, Vol: 285, Pages: 413-417, ISSN: 0378-7753

Journal article

Menzel A, Komin K, Yang Y, Gueder F, Trouillet V, Werner P, Zacharias Met al., 2015, Ultra-long zinc oxide nanowires and boron doping based on ionic liquid assisted thermal chemical vapor deposition growth, NANOSCALE, Vol: 7, Pages: 92-97, ISSN: 2040-3364

Journal article

So J-H, Tayi AS, Gueder F, Whitesides GMet al., 2014, Stepped Moduli in Layered Composites, ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, Vol: 24, Pages: 7197-7204, ISSN: 1616-301X

Journal article

Gueder F, Frei E, Kuecuekbayrak UM, Menzel A, Thomann R, Luptak R, Holaender B, Krossing I, Zacharias Met al., 2014, Engineered High Aspect Ratio Vertical Nanotubes as a Model System for the Investigation of Catalytic Methanol Synthesis Over Cu/ZnO, ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, Vol: 6, Pages: 1576-1582, ISSN: 1944-8244

Journal article

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