Imperial College London

Dr Graham Easton

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

g.easton

 
 
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Location

 

333Reynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

49 results found

Block M, Easton G, 2017, Time to revive the GP-focused clinical examination, British Journal of General Practice, Vol: 67, Pages: 360-360, ISSN: 0960-1643

Journal article

Brooks JHM, Ahmad I, Easton G, 2016, 10-MINUTE CONSULTATION Anabolic steroid use, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 355, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

Easton GP, 2016, Narrative in the consultation, Storytelling in medicine; how narrative can improve practice, Editors: Robertson, Clegg, ISBN: 9781785231377

Narrative medicine has revolutionised our thinking in many aspects of healthcare, but what does it mean for the doctor or healthcare professional in their daily work seeing patients? This chapter explores how the narrative revolution goes to the very heart of medicine – its central act, the consultation between doctor and patient. It sets out how a narrative understanding of what goes on in consultations can help you and your patients, shows you some skills to help you put narrative theory into practice, and introduces a narrative framework of the consultation to help you make sense of the stories that your patients are trying to tell.

Book chapter

Newth A, Easton G, 2016, Using the ‘windows method’ for undergraduate consultation skills feedback: GP tutors’ experiences, Education for Primary Care, Vol: 28, Pages: 115-118, ISSN: 1475-990X

Fifth year medical students at our institution have consultation skills teaching sessions in small groups in which they receive feedback on videos of their consultations with simulated patients. We introduced the “windows method” (described elsewhere in this issue) as a new approach to structure feedback in these sessions. This is a small focus group study of six GP tutors designed to explore their experiences of using the windows method in this undergraduate setting. Analysis of the focus group transcript revealed six dominant themes: addressing students’ emotions explicitly, using indirect feedback to the learner, the phrasing of feedback, the need to address clinical or ethical issues, the structure of the template form, and the influence of time. Tutors felt the windows method has the potential to be a useful tool to structure feedback in the undergraduate setting, and we offer suggestions for how others might adapt the method to their own learning environment.

Journal article

Easton G, 2016, Appointment, ISBN: 9781472136329

The Appointment offers an intimate and honest account of how a typical GP tries to make sense of a patient's health problems and manage them within the constraints of their health system and the short ten minute appointment.

Book

Brooks J, Ahmad I, Easton G, 2016, Promoting physical activity: the general practice agenda, BRITISH JOURNAL OF GENERAL PRACTICE, Vol: 66, Pages: 454-455, ISSN: 0960-1643

Journal article

Morton S, Thompson D, Wheeler P, Easton G, Majeed Aet al., 2016, What do patients really know? An evaluation of patients’ physical activity guideline knowledge within general practice, London Journal of Primary Care, Vol: 8, Pages: 48-55, ISSN: 1757-1480

Background: Physical inactivity is well recognised as one of the leading causes of preventable death. However, little is known about the general public’s knowledge surrounding national physical activity guidelines, particularly within general practice (GP).Setting: Two GPs (York and Maidenhead, UK).Question: Are GP patients aware of the national physical guidelines? Also, are health care professionals routinely raising the issue of physical inactivity and would patients welcome support from health care professionals regarding inactivity?Methodology: A questionnaire was distributed in two GPs over a one-week period to evaluate patients knowledge of the national physical activity guidelines.Results: Ninety-four participants completed the questionnaire over one week (60 female; 34 male), with an average age of 54.2 (standard deviation: 19.9 years). 14% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 8–22%) of the total participants correctly knew the recommended national guidelines for physical activity. 52% (95% CI: 42–63%) recalled being asked by a health care professional about their activity levels. 46% (95% CI: 35–56%) would welcome support from a health care professional around improving their activity levels.Discussion/Conclusion: Only 14% of responders correctly knew the current national minimum activity guidelines. Encouragingly 46% of participants in our study were interested in physical activity advice from a health care professional. Health care professionals need to be aware that many patients do not know the current physical activity guidelines and recognise that primary care may be an underutilised opportunity to educate and promote physical activity.

Journal article

Majeed F, Hansell A, Saxena S, Millett C, Ward H, Harris M, Hayhoe B, Car J, Easton G, Donnelly CA, Perneczky R, Jarvelin MR, Ezzati M, Rawaf S, Vineis P, Ferguson N, Riboli Eet al., 2016, How would a decision to leave the European Union affect medical research and health in the United Kingdom?, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Vol: 109, Pages: 216-218, ISSN: 1758-1095

Journal article

Dholakia S, Oskrochi Y, Easton G, Papalois Vet al., 2016, Advances in pancreas transplantation, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Vol: 109, Pages: 141-146, ISSN: 1758-1095

Journal article

Easton G, Block M, Hasan S, 2016, Strengthening links between GP training and academic primary care, Education for Primary Care, Vol: 27, Pages: 160-161, ISSN: 1475-990X

Journal article

Idowu Y, Muir E, Easton G, 2016, Problem-based learning case writing by students based on early years clinical attachments: a focus group evaluation., JRSM Open, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2054-2704

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the perception of medical students of the new approach to problem-based learning which involves students writing their own problem-based learning cases based on their recent clinical attachment, and team assessment. DESIGN: Focus group interviews with students using purposive sampling. Transcripts of the audio recordings were analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING: Imperial College School of Medicine, London. PARTICIPANTS: Medical students in the second year of the MBBS course, who attended the problem-based learning case writing session. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: To elicit the students' views about problem-based learning case writing and team assessment. RESULTS: The following broad themes emerged: effect of group dynamics on the process; importance of defining the tutor's role; role of summative assessment; feedback as a learning tool and the skills developed during the process. CONCLUSIONS: Overall the students found the new approach, writing problem-based learning cases based on patients seen during their clinical attachments, useful in helping them to gain a better understanding about the problem-based learning process, promoting creativity and reinforcing the importance of team work and peer assessment which are vital professional skills. Further tutor development and guidance for students about the new approach was found to be important in ensuring it is a good learning experience. We hope this evaluation will be of use to other institutions considering introducing students' case writing to problem-based learning.

Journal article

Idowu Y, Muir E, Easton G, 2016, PBL case writing by students based on early years clinical attachments: a focus group evaluation of a novel approach, JRSM Open, ISSN: 2054-2704

ObjectivesTo evaluate the perception of medical students of the new approach to problem-based learning which involves students writing their own problem-based learning cases based on their recent clinical attachment, and team assessment.DesignFocus group interviews with students using purposive sampling. Transcripts of the audio recordings were analysed using thematic analysis.SettingImperial College School of Medicine, London.ParticipantsMedical students in the second year of the MBBS course, who attended the problem-based learning case writing session.Main outcome measuresTo elicit the students’ views about problem-based learning case writing and team assessment.ResultsThe following broad themes emerged: effect of group dynamics on the process; importance of defining the tutor’s role; role of summative assessment; feedback as a learning tool and the skills developed during the process.ConclusionsOverall the students found the new approach, writing problem-based learning cases based on patients seen during their clinical attachments, useful in helping them to gain a better understanding about the problem-based learning process, promoting creativity and reinforcing the importance of team work and peer assessment which are vital professional skills. Further tutor development and guidance for students about the new approach was found to be important in ensuring it is a good learning experience. We hope this evaluation will be of use to other institutions considering introducing students’ case writing to problem-based learning.

Journal article

Easton GP, 2016, How medical teachers use narratives in lectures: a qualitative study, BMC Medical Education, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1472-6920

Background: There are strong theoretical arguments for using narratives in teaching and learning within medicine,but little is known about how they are used in medical lectures. This study explores the types of narratives lecturersuse, the attitudes of lecturers and students to the use of narratives in teaching, and the aspects of learning thatnarratives may facilitate.Methods: Observation of three medical lectures was followed by one-to-one interviews with the respective lecturers,and separate focus group interviews with medical students who attended each of the three lectures.Results: Lecturers used a variety of narratives on a range of themes, from clinical cases to patient experience narrativesor narratives about their professional careers. Students and lecturers highlighted key aspects of narrative learning: forexample providing a relevant context, as a “hook” to engage the audience, and as a memory aid.Conclusion: The findings support existing literature which suggests that narratives may be a useful tool for learning inmedicine. This study suggests that narratives tap into several key learning processes including providing a relevantcontext for understanding, engaging learners, and promoting memory. For medical students in lectures, narratives maybe particularly relevant in promoting humanistic aspects of medicine, including professional identity and empathy.

Journal article

Conway F, Majeed A, Easton G, 2015, Diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, British Medical Journal, Vol: 351, ISSN: 1468-5833

Journal article

Oskrochi Y, Majeed A, Easton G, 2015, Biting off more than we can chew: is BMI the correct standard for bariatric surgery eligibility?, British Journal of General Practice, Vol: 65, Pages: 482-483, ISSN: 0960-1643

In the UK, the proportion of adults with obesity has been increasing significantly, with no signs of any reversal;1 this is despite the UK government ambitiously announcing in 2007 that England was to be the first country to reverse the trend in rising rates of obesity and the introduction of public health programmes such as Healthy Lives, Healthy People, and Change4Life.One reason why obesity has proved difficult to control is due to the limited impact of pharmacological interventions. Adverse effects such as valve disease and pulmonary hypertension (as a result of fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine treatment), psychiatric disorders (associated with rimonabant) and increased risk of myocardial infarcts or stroke (due to sibutramine) forced withdrawal of drugs by regulators or resulted in voluntary withdrawal by manufacturers. Of those drugs for obesity that remain, many are short-term and only give modest results (<4 kg weight loss) while only one (orlistat) is licensed for long-term management; all are associated with common and unpleasant side-effects.2

Journal article

Oskrochi Y, Majeed A, Easton G, 2015, Bariatric surgery., BMJ, Vol: 351

Journal article

Easton GP, Oskrochi Y, 2015, Weights and measures: are bariatric surgery guidelines realistic?, JRSM open, ISSN: 2054-2704

Journal article

Cantillon P, Easton GP, 2015, Three Papers On...Feedback - what's new?, Education for Primary Care, Vol: 26, Pages: 116-117, ISSN: 1475-990X

Journal article

Lupton M, Easton GP, 2015, Teach where students will learn: one medical school's vision of the future, Education for Primary Care, Vol: 26, Pages: 57-59, ISSN: 1475-990X

Journal article

Easton G, Baker R, 2015, Seven Days a Week, 8 AM to 8 PM Improving Access to National Health Service Primary Care, JOURNAL OF AMBULATORY CARE MANAGEMENT, Vol: 38, Pages: 16-24, ISSN: 0148-9917

Journal article

Easton G, 2015, Do students prefer being on their own or in pairs during their GP attachment?, EDUCATION FOR PRIMARY CARE, Vol: 26, Pages: 443-443, ISSN: 1473-9879

Journal article

Cantillon P, Easton G, 2015, A new series on current thinking in education for the busy primary care educator, EDUCATION FOR PRIMARY CARE, Vol: 26, Pages: 3-3, ISSN: 1473-9879

Journal article

Easton G, Cantillon P, 2015, Mindfulness for the clinical teacher, EDUCATION FOR PRIMARY CARE, Vol: 26, Pages: 24-25, ISSN: 1473-9879

Journal article

Easton GP, Ahmad, Nair, Blocket al., 2014, How to Pass the CSA Exam: For GP Trainees and MRCGP CSA Candidates, London, Publisher: Wiley, ISBN: 978-1118471012

Distinctively pairing video footage and role–play scenarios, How to Pass the CSA Exam presents a broad range of consultations in the most common clinical areas a trainee or GP ST3 is likely to encounter, to reinforce core knowledge and skills. Cases cover the entire CSA case selection blueprint, with a range of acute, chronic, undifferentiated, psychosocial and preventative cases in the different disease areas.

Book

Easton G, 2014, Primary care education research - time to raise our game?, Educ Prim Care, Vol: 25, Pages: 304-307, ISSN: 1473-9879

Journal article

Baudains C, Metters E, Easton G, Booton Pet al., 2013, What educational resources are medical students using for personal study during primary care attachments?, Educ Prim Care, Vol: 24, Pages: 340-345, ISSN: 1473-9879

INTRODUCTION: Today's medical students have grown up in a technological world, with access to a wide variety of educational resources for their personal study. Although there is some evidence from the USA that students prefer the internet to textbooks, there is little evidence of UK students' preferences, particularly during their primary care attachments. AIMS: To identify what educational resources medical students are using for their personal study during primary care attachments and why they make these choices. METHODS: We held two focus groups, one with five, and one with seven fifth-year UK medical students after their primary care attachment. We analysed the transcripts using thematic analysis to identify the educational resources used, and identified themes to describe why the students made these choices. RESULTS: Textbooks remain students' resource of choice for personal study. The most popular textbook was The Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine and internet sites were Google and GP Notebook. The choice of resource was influenced by convenience, purpose, recommendation, exam focus, reliability and learning styles. Two further overarching themes influencing their choices were the broad nature of general practice and the use of GP tutors as an important learning resource. DISCUSSION: In contrast to the USA, textbooks remain the most popular resource for these UK students. Students felt that the style of learning within general practice was fundamentally different to other specialities due to the breadth of the subject matter and this influenced the resources used. This research could help inform the development of educational resources tailored to the learners, and provides further evidence for the need to develop a more structured curriculum for students in primary care. Further research could explore the ideal role of GP tutors.

Journal article

Booton P, Cooper C, Easton G, Harper Met al., 2012, General Practice at a Glance, Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN: 9780470655511

Book

Powell S, Easton G, 2012, Student perceptions of GP teachers' role in community-based undergraduate surgical education: a qualitative study, J R Soc Med Sh Rep, Vol: 3

Journal article

Easton G, Stratford-Martin J, Atherton H, 2012, An appraisal of the literature on teaching physical examination skills, Educ Prim Care, Vol: (4), Pages: 246-254

Journal article

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