Imperial College London

Giorgio F. Gilestro

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences

Lecturer in Systems Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5443g.gilestro Website CV

 
 
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Location

 

408Sir Ernst Chain BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Course/Module

Lecturer, BSc Pharmacology. (Undergraduate)

Lecturer, Genes and Genomics. (Undergraduate)

Lecturer, Systems Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain in Health and Disease. (Undergraduate)

Genes and Genomics - LS2-GG

Aims

The aim of this course is to build upon the fundamental molecular biology you learned in MB. The 
course will draw upon advances in genomic technology to achieve this. This will mean reenforcing some key concepts without overly repeating what was taught last year. We will also 
introduce some new areas to develop your interests and prime you for the final year where some 
of you may want to pursue molecular biology-related topics in more depth. The assessment of 
this course will reflect these learning outcomes (see below).
This document should be more than a timetable to you. It is your ‘Genes and Genomics Bible’. 
Not only does it tell you when and where each teaching session is, but also allows you to 
organize your progress in the various coursework elements, tells you what you should already 
know from first year teaching and what you should be learning now. Please complete it as you 
progress through the course. 

Role

Lecturer

Behavioural Ecology - LS2-BE

Aims

Behavioural Ecology is an evolutionary approach to the study of animal behaviour; the rationale being that behaviour evolves through natural selection to increase fitness within given ecological, social and historical constraints. The course aims to give an understanding of behaviour using a theoretical framework to study the interaction between behaviour, ecology and evolution. Through the lectures, theoretical concepts (such as optimality models, game theory and comparative methods) will be applied to key areas of animal behaviour such as foraging, communication, where to live/dispersal/migration, fighting/competition, reproductive behaviour (including sexual selection, sexual conflict, alternative mating behaviour), parental care and social behaviour. The lectures on the ultimate causes of behaviour will be supplemented with those investigating the proximate causes of behaviour. The lectures will be complemented by an emphasis on practical work and experimentation. Students will be taught experimental design in animal behaviour and how to quantify and analyse behaviour using jWatcher software. Practicals using insects, birds and fish will be used to investigate grouping, vigilance, fighting, communication, and reproductive behaviour and a trip to London Zoo will introduce students to the study of primate behaviour. Finally, students will be given the opportunity to conduct a mini-project using crickets or fish.

Role

Lecturer