Imperial College London

ProfessorGuyRutter

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

Chair in Cell Biology and Head of Cell Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3340g.rutter Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Shazi Singh +44 (0)20 7594 3391

 
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Location

 

327ICTEM buildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

579 results found

Hu M, Cebola I, Carrat G, Jiang S, Nawaz S, Khamis A, Canouil M, Froguel P, Schulte A, Solimena M, Ibberson M, Marchetti P, Cardenas-Diaz FL, Gadue PJ, Hastoy B, Almeida-Souza L, McMahon H, Rutter GAet al., 2021, Chromatin 3D interaction analysis of the STARD10 locus unveils FCHSD2 as a regulator of insulin secretion., Cell Research, Vol: 34, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 1001-0602

Using chromatin conformation capture, we show that an enhancer cluster in the STARD10 type 2 diabetes (T2D) locus forms a defined 3-dimensional (3D) chromatin domain. A 4.1-kb region within this locus, carrying 5 T2D-associated variants, physically interacts with CTCF-binding regions and with an enhancer possessing strong transcriptional activity. Analysis of human islet 3D chromatin interaction maps identifies the FCHSD2 gene as an additional target of the enhancer cluster. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated deletion of the variant region, or of the associated enhancer, from human pancreas-derived EndoC-βH1 cells impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Expression of both STARD10 and FCHSD2 is reduced in cells harboring CRISPR deletions, and lower expression of STARD10 and FCHSD2 is associated, the latter nominally, with the possession of risk variant alleles in human islets. Finally, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated loss of STARD10 or FCHSD2, but not ARAP1, impairs regulated insulin secretion. Thus, multiple genes at the STARD10 locus influence β cell function.

Journal article

Ghiasi SM, Rutter GA, 2021, Consequences for pancreatic beta-cell identity and function of unregulated transcript processing, Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 1664-2392

Mounting evidence suggests a role for alternative splicing (AS) of transcripts in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of the pancreatic β-cell. In the apparent absence of RNA repair systems, RNA decay pathways are likely to play an important role in controlling the stability, distribution and diversity of transcript isoforms in these cells. Around 35% of alternatively spliced transcripts in human cells contain premature termination codons (PTCs) and are targeted for degradation via nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), a vital quality control process. Inflammatory cytokines, whose levels are increased in both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes, stimulate alternative splicing events and the expression of NMD components, and may or may not be associated with the activation of the NMD pathway. It is, however, now possible to infer that NMD plays a crucial role in regulating transcript processing in normal and stress conditions in pancreatic β-cells. In this review, we describe the possible role of Regulated Unproductive Splicing and Translation (RUST), a molecular mechanism embracing NMD activity in relationship to AS and translation of damaged transcript isoforms in these cells. This process substantially reduces the abundance of non-functional transcript isoforms, and its dysregulation may be involved in pancreatic β-cell failure in diabetes.

Journal article

López-Noriega L, Rutter GA, 2021, Long non-coding RNAs as key modulators of pancreatic β-Cell mass and function, Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1664-2392

Numerous studies have sought to decipher the genetic and other mechanisms contributing to β-cell loss and dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. However, we have yet to fully understand the etiology of the disease or to develop satisfactory treatments. Since the majority of diabetes susceptibility loci are mapped to non-coding regions within the genome, understanding the functions of non-coding RNAs in β-cell biology might provide crucial insights into the pathogenesis of type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes. During the past decade, numerous studies have indicated that long non-coding RNAs play important roles in the maintenance of β-cell mass and function. Indeed, lncRNAs have been shown to be involved in controlling β-cell proliferation during development and/or β-cell compensation in response to hyperglycaemia. LncRNAs such as TUG-1 and MEG3 play a role in both β-cell apoptosis and function, while others sensitize β-cells to apoptosis in response to stress signals. In addition, several long non-coding RNAs have been shown to regulate the expression of β-cell-enriched transcription factors in cis or in trans. In this review, we provide an overview of the roles of lncRNAs in maintaining β-function and mass, and discuss their relevance in the development of diabetes.

Journal article

Nasteska D, Fine NHF, Ashford FB, Cuozzo F, Viloria K, Smith G, Dahir A, Dawson PWJ, Lai Y-C, Bastidas-Ponce A, Bakhti M, Rutter GA, Fiancette R, Nano R, Piemonti L, Lickert H, Zhou Q, Akerman I, Hodson DJet al., 2021, PDX1LOW MAFALOW β-cells contribute to islet function and insulin release., Nat Commun, Vol: 12

Transcriptionally mature and immature β-cells co-exist within the adult islet. How such diversity contributes to insulin release remains poorly understood. Here we show that subtle differences in β-cell maturity, defined using PDX1 and MAFA expression, contribute to islet operation. Functional mapping of rodent and human islets containing proportionally more PDX1HIGH and MAFAHIGH β-cells reveals defects in metabolism, ionic fluxes and insulin secretion. At the transcriptomic level, the presence of increased numbers of PDX1HIGH and MAFAHIGH β-cells leads to dysregulation of gene pathways involved in metabolic processes. Using a chemogenetic disruption strategy, differences in PDX1 and MAFA expression are shown to depend on islet Ca2+ signaling patterns. During metabolic stress, islet function can be restored by redressing the balance between PDX1 and MAFA levels across the β-cell population. Thus, preserving heterogeneity in PDX1 and MAFA expression, and more widely in β-cell maturity, might be important for the maintenance of islet function.

Journal article

Mousavy Gharavy SN, Owen BM, Millership SJ, Chabosseau P, Pizza G, Martinez-Sanchez A, Tasoez E, Georgiadou E, Hu M, Fine NHF, Jacobson DA, Dickerson MT, Idevall-Hagren O, Montoya A, Kramer H, Mehta Z, Withers DJ, Ninov N, Gadue PJ, Cardenas-Diaz FL, Cruciani-Guglielmacci C, Magnan C, Ibberson M, Leclerc I, Voz M, Rutter GAet al., 2021, Sexually dimorphic roles for the type 2 diabetes-associated C2cd4b gene in murine glucose homeostasis, DIABETOLOGIA, Vol: 64, Pages: 850-864, ISSN: 0012-186X

Journal article

Chabosseau P, Rutter G, Millership S, 2021, Importance of both imprinted genes and functional heterogeneity in pancreatic beta cells: is there a link?, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1422-0067

Diabetes mellitus now affects more than 400 million individuals worldwide, with significant impacts on the lives of those affected and associated socio-economic costs. Although defects in insulin secretion underlie all forms of the disease, the molecular mechanisms which drive them are still poorly understood. Subsets of specialised beta cells have, in recent years, been suggested to play critical roles in “pacing” overall islet activity. The molecular nature of these cells, the means through which their identity is established and the changes which may contribute to their functional demise and “loss of influence” in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are largely unknown. Genomic imprinting involves the selective silencing of one of the two parental alleles through DNA methylation and modified imprinted gene expression is involved in a number of diseases. Loss of expression, or loss of imprinting, can be shown in mouse models to lead to defects in beta cell function and abnormal insulin secretion. In the present review we survey the evidence that altered expression of imprinted genes contribute to loss of beta cell function, the importance of beta cell heterogeneity in normal and disease states, and hypothesise whether there is a direct link between the two.

Journal article

Jones B, McGlone ER, Fang Z, Pickford P, Corrêa IR, Oishi A, Jockers R, Inoue A, Kumar S, Görlitz F, Dunsby C, French PMW, Rutter GA, Tan TM, Tomas A, Bloom SRet al., 2021, Genetic and biased agonist-mediated reductions in β-arrestin recruitment prolong cAMP signalling at glucagon family receptors, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol: 296, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 0021-9258

Receptors for the peptide hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1R), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) are important regulators of insulin secretion and energy metabolism. GLP-1R agonists have been successfully deployed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but it has been suggested that their efficacy is limited by target receptor desensitisation and downregulation due to recruitment of β-arrestins. Indeed, recently described GLP-1R agonists with reduced β-arrestin-2 recruitment have delivered promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. We therefore aimed to determine if the same phenomenon could apply to the closely related GIPR and GCGR. In HEK293 cells depleted of both β-arrestin isoforms the duration of G protein-dependent cAMP/PKA signalling was increased in response to the endogenous ligand for each receptor. Moreover, in wild-type cells, “biased” GLP-1, GCG and GIP analogues with selective reductions in β-arrestin-2 recruitment led to reduced receptor endocytosis and increased insulin secretion over a prolonged stimulation period, although the latter effect was only seen at high agonist concentrations. Biased GCG analogues increased the duration of cAMP signalling, but this did not lead to increased glucose output from hepatocytes. Our study provides a rationale for development of GLP-1R, GIPR and GCGR agonists with reduced β-arrestin recruitment, but further work is needed to maximally exploit this strategy for therapeutic purposes.

Journal article

Marselli L, Piron A, Suleiman M, Colli ML, Yi X, Khamis A, Carrat GR, Rutter GA, Bugliani M, Giusti L, Ronci M, Ibberson M, Turatsinze J-V, Boggi U, De Simone P, De Tata V, Lopes M, Nasteska D, De Luca C, Tesi M, Bosi E, Singh P, Campani D, Schulte AM, Solimena M, Hecht P, Rady B, Bakaj I, Pocai A, Norquay L, Thorens B, Canouil M, Froguel P, Eizirik DL, Cnop M, Marchetti Pet al., 2020, Persistent or transient human β cell dysfunction induced by metabolic stress: specific signatures and shared gene expression with type 2 diabetes, Cell Reports, Vol: 33, ISSN: 2211-1247

Pancreatic β cell failure is key to type 2 diabetes (T2D) onset and progression. Here, we assess whether human β cell dysfunction induced by metabolic stress is reversible, evaluate the molecular pathways underlying persistent or transient damage, and explore the relationships with T2D islet traits. Twenty-six islet preparations are exposed to several lipotoxic/glucotoxic conditions, some of which impair insulin release, depending on stressor type, concentration, and combination. The reversal of dysfunction occurs after washout for some, although not all, of the lipoglucotoxic insults. Islet transcriptomes assessed by RNA sequencing and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis identify specific pathways underlying β cell failure and recovery. Comparison of a large number of human T2D islet transcriptomes with those of persistent or reversible β cell lipoglucotoxicity show shared gene expression signatures. The identification of mechanisms associated with human β cell dysfunction and recovery and their overlap with T2D islet traits provide insights into T2D pathogenesis, fostering the development of improved β cell-targeted therapeutic strategies.

Journal article

Jones B, Fang Z, Chen S, Manchanda Y, Bitsi S, Pickford P, David A, Shchepinova MM, Corrêa Jr IR, Hodson DJ, Broichhagen J, Tate EW, Reimann F, Salem V, Rutter GA, Tan T, Bloom SR, Tomas Aet al., 2020, Ligand-specific factors influencing GLP-1 receptor post-endocytic trafficking and degradation in pancreatic beta cells, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol: 212, Pages: 1-24, ISSN: 1422-0067

The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is an important regulator of blood glucose homeostasis. Ligand-specific differences in membrane trafficking of the GLP-1R influence its signalling properties and therapeutic potential in type 2 diabetes. Here, we have evaluated how different factors combine to control the post-endocytic trafficking of GLP-1R to recycling versus degradative pathways. Experiments were performed in primary islet cells, INS-1 832/3 clonal beta cells and HEK293 cells, using biorthogonal labelling of GLP-1R to determine its localisation and degradation after treatment with GLP-1, exendin-4 and several further GLP-1R agonist peptides. We also characterised the effect of a rare GLP1R coding variant, T149M, and the role of endosomal peptidase endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1), in GLP1R trafficking. Our data reveal how treatment with GLP-1 versus exendin-4 is associated with preferential GLP-1R targeting towards a recycling pathway. GLP-1, but not exendin-4, is a substrate for ECE-1, and the resultant propensity to intra-endosomal degradation, in conjunction with differences in binding affinity, contributes to alterations in GLP-1R trafficking behaviours and degradation. The T149M GLP-1R variant shows reduced signalling and internalisation responses, which is likely to be due to disruption of the cytoplasmic region that couples to intracellular effectors. These observations provide insights into how ligand- and genotype-specific factors can influence GLP-1R trafficking.

Journal article

Georgiadou E, Rutter GA, 2020, Control by Ca2+ of mitochondrial structure and function in pancreatic β-cells, Cell Calcium, Vol: 91, ISSN: 0143-4160

Mitochondria play a central role in glucose metabolism and the stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. In this review, we discuss firstly the regulation and roles of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in glucose-regulated insulin secretion, and the molecular machinery involved. Next, we discuss the evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction in β-cells is associated with type 2 diabetes, from a genetic, functional and structural point of view, and then the possibility that these changes may in part be mediated by dysregulation of cytosolic Ca2+. Finally, we review the importance of preserved mitochondrial structure and dynamics for mitochondrial gene expression and their possible relevance to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

Journal article

Ming X, Chung ACK, Mao D, Cao H, Fan B, Wong WKK, Ho CC, Lee HM, Schoonjans K, Auwerx J, Rutter GA, Chan JCN, Tian XY, Kong APSet al., 2020, Pancreatic Sirtuin 3 deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis by enhancing 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis in diet-induced Obese mice, Diabetes, Vol: 70, Pages: 119-131, ISSN: 0012-1797

Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a protein deacetylase regulating beta cell function through inhibiting oxidative stress in obese and diabetic mice, but the detailed mechanism and potential effect of beta cell specific SIRT3 on metabolic homeostasis, and its potential effect on other metabolic organs are unknown. We found glucose tolerance and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were impaired in high fat diet (HFD)-fed beta cell selective Sirt3 knockout (Sirt3f/f;Cre/+) mice. In addition, Sirt3f/f;Cre/+ mice had more severe hepatic steatosis than Sirt3f/f mice upon HFD feeding. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of islets suggested that Sirt3 deficiency over-activated 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) synthesis as evidenced by up-regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1). 5-HT concentration was increased in both islets and serum of Sirt3f/f;Cre/+ mice. 5-HT also facilitated the effect of palmitate to increase lipid deposition. Treatment with TPH1 inhibitor ameliorated hepatic steatosis and reduced weight gain in HFD-fed Sirt3f/f;Cre/+ mice. These data suggested that under HFD feeding, SIRT3 deficiency in beta cells not only regulates insulin secretion but also modulates hepatic lipid metabolism via the release of 5-HT.

Journal article

Nguyen-Tu M-S, Martinez-Sanchez A, Leclerc I, Rutter GA, da Silva Xavier Get al., 2020, Adipocyte-specific deletion of Tcf7l2 induces dysregulated lipid metabolism and impairs glucose tolerance in mice, DIABETOLOGIA, Vol: 64, Pages: 129-141, ISSN: 0012-186X

Journal article

Muniangi-Muhitu H, Akalestou E, Salem V, Misra S, Oliver NS, Rutter GAet al., 2020, Covid-19 and diabetes: a complex bidirectional relationship, Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1664-2392

Covid-19 is a recently-emerged infectious disease caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus SARS-CoV2. SARS-CoV2 differs from previous coronavirus infections (SARS and MERS) due to its high infectivity (reproduction value, R0, typically 2-4) and pre- or asymptomatic transmission, properties that have contributed to the current global Covid-19 pandemic. Identified risk factors for disease severity and death from SARS-Cov2 infection include older age, male sex, diabetes, obesity and hypertension. The reasons for these associations are still largely obscure. Evidence is also emerging that SARS-CoV2 infection exacerbates the underlying pathophysiology of hyperglycemia in people with diabetes. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms through which diabetes may affect the risk of more severe outcomes in Covid-19 and, additionally, how diabetic emergencies and longer term pathology may be aggravated by infection with the virus. We consider roles for the immune system, the observed phenomenon of microangiopathy in severe Covid-19 infection and the potential for direct viral toxicity on metabolically-relevant tissues including pancreatic beta cells and targets of insulin action.

Journal article

Carrat GR, Haythorne E, Tomas A, Haataja L, Müller A, Arvan P, Piunti A, Cheng K, Huang M, Pullen TJ, Georgiadou E, Stylianides T, Amirruddin NS, Salem V, Distaso W, Cakebread A, Heesom KJ, Lewis PA, Hodson DJ, Briant LJ, Fung ACH, Sessions RB, Alpy F, Kong APS, Benke PI, Torta F, Keong Teo AK, Leclerc I, Solimena M, Wigley DB, Rutter GAet al., 2020, The type 2 diabetes gene product STARD10 is a phosphoinositide-binding protein that controls insulin secretory granule biogenesis, Molecular Metabolism, Vol: 40, ISSN: 2212-8778

OBJECTIVE: Risk alleles for type 2 diabetes at the STARD10 locus are associated with lowered STARD10 expression in the β-cell, impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, and decreased circulating proinsulin:insulin ratios. Although likely to serve as a mediator of intracellular lipid transfer, the identity of the transported lipids and thus the pathways through which STARD10 regulates β-cell function are not understood. The aim of this study was to identify the lipids transported and affected by STARD10 in the β-cell and the role of the protein in controlling proinsulin processing and insulin granule biogenesis and maturation. METHODS: We used isolated islets from mice deleted selectively in the β-cell for Stard10 (βStard10KO) and performed electron microscopy, pulse-chase, RNA sequencing, and lipidomic analyses. Proteomic analysis of STARD10 binding partners was executed in the INS1 (832/13) cell line. X-ray crystallography followed by molecular docking and lipid overlay assay was performed on purified STARD10 protein. RESULTS: βStard10KO islets had a sharply altered dense core granule appearance, with a dramatic increase in the number of "rod-like" dense cores. Correspondingly, basal secretion of proinsulin was increased versus wild-type islets. The solution of the crystal structure of STARD10 to 2.3 Å resolution revealed a binding pocket capable of accommodating polyphosphoinositides, and STARD10 was shown to bind to inositides phosphorylated at the 3' position. Lipidomic analysis of âStard10KO islets demonstrated changes in phosphatidylinositol levels, and the inositol lipid kinase PIP4K2C was identified as a STARD10 binding partner. Also consistent with roles for STARD10 in phosphoinositide signalling, the phosphoinositide-binding proteins Pirt and Synaptotagmin 1 were amongst the differentially expressed genes in βStard10KO islets. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that STARD10 binds to, and may transp

Journal article

Rutter GA, Georgiadou E, Martinez-Sanchez A, Pullen TJet al., 2020, Metabolic and functional specialisations of the pancreatic beta cell: gene disallowance, mitochondrial metabolism and intercellular connectivity, DIABETOLOGIA, Vol: 63, Pages: 1990-1998, ISSN: 0012-186X

Journal article

Hu M, Cherkaoui I, Misra S, Rutter GAet al., 2020, Functional genomics in pancreatic β cells: recent advances in gene deletion and genome editing technologies for diabetes research., Front Endocrinol (Lausanne), Vol: 11, Pages: 1-20, ISSN: 1664-2392

The inheritance of variants that lead to coding changes in, or the mis-expression of, genes critical to pancreatic beta cell function can lead to alterations in insulin secretion and increase the risk of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Recently developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9) gene editing tools provide a powerful means of understanding the impact of identified variants on cell function, growth, and survival and might ultimately provide a means, most likely after the transplantation of genetically "corrected" cells, of treating the disease. Here, we review some of the disease-associated genes and variants whose roles have been probed up to now. Next, we survey recent exciting developments in CRISPR/Cas9 technology and their possible exploitation for β cell functional genomics. Finally, we will provide a perspective as to how CRISPR/Cas9 technology may find clinical application in patients with diabetes.

Journal article

Mao D, Tian XY, Mao D, Hung SW, Wang CC, Lau CBS, Lee HM, Wong CK, Chow E, Ming X, Cao H, Ma RC, Chan PKS, Kong APS, Li JJX, Rutter GA, Tam WH, Chan JCNet al., 2020, A polysaccharide extract from the medicinal plant Maidong inhibits the IKK-NF-kappa B pathway and IL-1 beta-induced islet inflammation and increases insulin secretion, JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 295, Pages: 12573-12587, ISSN: 0021-9258

Journal article

Hu M, Cebola I, Carrat G, Nawaz S, Khamis A, Canouil M, Froguel P, Schulte A, Solimena M, Ibberson M, Marchetti P, Gadue P, Hastoy B, McMahon H, Rutter Get al., 2020, Chromatin 3D interaction analysis of the STARD10 locus unveils FCHSD2 as a new regulator of insulin secretion, Publisher: SPRINGER

Working paper

Rutter GA, Georgiadou E, Rodriguez T, Muralidharan C, Martinez M, Chabosseau P, Tomas A, Carrat G, Di Gregorio A, Leclerc I, Linnemann AKet al., 2020, Pancreatic beta cell-selective deletion of themitofusins 1 and 2 (Mfn1 and Mfn2) impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo, 56th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S6-S7, ISSN: 0012-186X

Conference paper

Carrat G, Haataja L, Arvan P, Tomas A, Cheng K, Amirruddin NS, Sessions RB, Teo AK, Wigley D, Rutter GAet al., 2020, The type 2 diabetes-associated lipid-binding protein STARD10 could bind phosphatidylinositides and affect islet lipid composition, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 39-39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Akalestou E, Lopez-Noriega L, Leclerc I, Rutter GAet al., 2020, Metabolic surgery inhibits sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) expression in the kidney of lean mice, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 43-43, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Suba K, Patel Y, Alonso AM, Ukwuoma M, Kalogianni V, Leclerc I, Owen B, Rutter GA, Bloom SR, Salem Vet al., 2020, Clinical care and other categories posters: Hypoglycaemia, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 25-25, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Noriega LL, Sanchez AM, Callingham R, Akalestou E, Chabosseau P, Leclerc I, Marchetti P, Pullen TJ, Rutter GAet al., 2020, The long non-coding RNA PAX6-AS1 modulates human beta cell function, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 38-39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Callingham RM, Leclerc I, Pullen TJ, Rutter GAet al., 2020, The impact of a long non-coding RNA at the Pax6 locus on beta cell identity and function, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 38-38, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Ali UT, Suba K, Bitsi S, Alonso AM, Patel Y, Leclerc I, Rutter GA, Rothery S, Tomas A, Salem Vet al., 2020, Improving islet transplantation success by increasing expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 36-36, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Akalestou E, Suba K, Lopez-Noriega L, Georgiadou E, Chabosseau P, Leclerc I, Salem V, Rutter GAet al., 2020, Metabolic surgery recovers Ca(2+)dynamics across pancreatic islets in obese mice, 56th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S114-S114, ISSN: 0012-186X

Conference paper

Rutter GA, Ninov N, Salem V, Hodson DJet al., 2020, Comment on Satin et al. "Take Me To Your Leader": An Electrophysiological Appraisal of the Role of Hub Cells in Pancreatic Islets. Diabetes 2020;69:830-836, DIABETES, Vol: 69, Pages: E10-E11, ISSN: 0012-1797

Journal article

Pickford P, Lucey M, Fang Z, Bitsi S, Bernardino de la Serna J, Broichhagen J, Hodson DJ, Minnion J, Rutter GA, Bloom SR, Tomas A, Jones Bet al., 2020, Signalling, trafficking and glucoregulatory properties of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists exendin-4 and lixisenatide., British Journal of Pharmacology, Vol: 177, Pages: 3905-3923, ISSN: 0007-1188

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Amino acid substitutions at the N-termini of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) peptides result in distinct patterns of intracellular signalling, sub-cellular trafficking and efficacy in vivo. Here we aimed to determine whether sequence differences at the ligand C-termini of clinically approved GLP-1RAs exendin-4 and lixisenatide lead to similar phenomena. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Exendin-4, lixisenatide, and N-terminally substituted analogues with biased signalling characteristics were compared across a range of in vitro trafficking and signalling assays in different cell types. Fluorescent ligands and new time-resolved FRET approaches were developed to study agonist behaviours at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Anti-hyperglycaemic and anorectic effects of each parent ligand, and their biased derivatives, were assessed in mice. KEY RESULTS: Lixisenatide and exendin-4 showed equal binding affinity, but lixisenatide was 5-fold less potent for cAMP signalling. Both peptides induced extensive GLP-1R clustering in the plasma membrane and were rapidly endocytosed, but the GLP-1R recycled more slowly to the cell surface after lixisenatide treatment. These combined deficits resulted in reduced maximal sustained insulin secretion and reduced anti-hyperglycaemic and anorectic effects in mice with lixisenatide. N-terminal substitution of His1 by Phe1 to both ligands had favourable effects on their pharmacology, resulting in improved insulin release and lowering of blood glucose. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Changes to the C-terminus of exendin-4 affect signalling potency and GLP-1R trafficking via mechanisms unrelated to GLP-1R occupancy. These differences were associated with changes in their ability to control blood glucose and therefore may be therapeutically relevant.

Journal article

Mostafa D, Yanagiya A, Georgiadou E, Wu Y, Stylianides T, Rutter GA, Suzuki T, Yamamoto Tet al., 2020, Loss of beta-cell identity and diabetic phenotype in mice caused by disruption of CNOT3-dependent mRNA deadenylation, COMMUNICATIONS BIOLOGY, Vol: 3

Journal article

Ralston JC, Nguyen-Tu M-S, Lyons CL, Cooke AA, Murphy AM, Falvey A, Finucane OM, McGillicuddy FC, Rutter GA, Roche HMet al., 2020, Dietary substitution of SFA with MUFA within high-fat diets attenuates hyperinsulinaemia and pancreatic islet dysfunction, BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, Vol: 124, Pages: 247-255, ISSN: 0007-1145

Journal article

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