Imperial College London

MsGiskinDay

Faculty of MedicineFaculty of Medicine Centre

Principal Teaching Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

giskin.day

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Carly Line +44 (0)20 7594 5178

 
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Location

 

281Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

14 results found

Day G, 2021, Creative practice: give it a go to grow, InnovAiT, ISSN: 1755-7380

Why is creativity a valuable skill for health professionals? ‘Medicine is an art as well as a science’ is a cliché but it is not without truth. ‘Art’ in this context does not mean the ability to paint or sculpt. It means having the confidence to trust yourself to make sound judgements when the situation cannot be resolved by recourse to science alone. Patients do not generally present in the guise of multiple-choice questions. Often there is no possibility of a single right answer, merely options in which exercising good judgement requires a mix of intuition and intelligence. Above all, the art of medicine is the recognition that the ability to respond effectively and compassionately to people in distress is not governed by protocols or mnemonics. It requires ingenuity. We must engage our moral imaginations to think ourselves into the predicament of others. The art of good doctoring is finding a balance between identifying with patients enough to convey that they matter, and not so much that it causes you to become emotionally exhausted. Having a sound sense of yourself as a creative being equips you to tap into your own resourcefulness and imagination, to care for others and, by extension, to care for yourself.

Journal article

Day G, 2021, Reflecting on 'Encountering Pain', Encountering Pain Hearing, seeing, speaking, Editors: Padfield, Zakrzewska, Publisher: UCL Press, Pages: 370-378, ISBN: 9781787352636

How do we respond to the pain of another, and can we do it better? Can explaining how pain works help us handle it? This unique compilation of voices addresses these and bigger questions.

Book chapter

Day G, Robert G, Rafferty AM, 2020, Gratitude in health care: a meta-narrative review., Qualitative Health Research, Vol: 30, Pages: 2303-2315, ISSN: 1049-7323

Research into gratitude as a significant sociological and psychological phenomenon has proliferated in the past two decades. However, there is little consensus on how it should be conceptualized or investigated empirically. We present a meta-narrative review that focuses on gratitude in health care, with an emphasis on research exploring interpersonal experiences in the context of care provision. Six meta-narratives from literatures across the humanities, sciences, and medicine are identified, contextualized, and discussed: gratitude as social capital; gifts; care ethics; benefits of gratitude; gratitude and staff well-being; and gratitude as an indicator of quality of care. Meta-narrative review was a valuable framework for making sense of theoretical antecedents and findings in this developing area of research. We conclude that greater attention needs to be given to what constitutes "evidence" in gratitude research and call for qualitative studies to better understand and shape the role and implications of gratitude in health care.

Journal article

Harvey P, Chiavaroli N, Day G, 2020, Arts and humanities in health professional education, Clinical Education for the Health Professions, Editors: Nestel, Reedy, McKenna, Gough, Publisher: Springer Singapore, Pages: 1-18, ISBN: 9789811361067

This chapter provides a perspective on clinical education through the lens of the humanities. It discusses enhancing clinical expertise by focusing learning on affective aspects of a learner’s discipline, assisting their development as effective health professionals.

Book chapter

Day G, 2019, Enhancing relational care through expressions of gratitude: insights from a historical case study of almoner-patient correspondence, Medical Humanities, Vol: 46, Pages: 288-298, ISSN: 1468-215X

This paper considers insights for contemporary medical practice from an archival study of gratitude in letters exchanged between almoners at London's Brompton Hospital and patients treated at the Hospital's tuberculosis sanatorium in Frimley. In the era before the National Health Service, almoners were responsible for assessing the entitlement of patients to charitable treatment, but they also took on responsibility for aftercare and advising patients on all aspects of welfare. In addition, a major part of the work of almoners at the Brompton was to record the health and employment status of former sanatorium patients for medical research. Of over 6000 patients treated between 1905 and 1963 that were tracked for the purposes of Medical Research Council cohort studies, fewer than 6% were recorded as 'lost to follow-up'-a remarkable testimony to the success of the almoners' strategies for maintaining long-term patient engagement. A longitudinal narrative case study is presented with illustrative examples of types of gratitude extracted from a corpus of over 1500 correspondents' letters. Patients sent money, gifts and stamps in gratitude for treatment received and for the almoners' ongoing interest in their welfare. Textual analysis of letters from the almoner shows the semantic strategies that position gratitude as central to the personalisation of an institutional relationship. The Brompton letters are conceptualised as a Maussian gift-exchange ritual, in which communal ties are created, consolidated and extended through the performance of gratitude. This study implicates gratitude as central to the willingness of former patients to continue to engage with the Hospital, sometimes for decades after treatment. Suggestions are offered for how contemporary relational healthcare might be informed by this unique collection of patients' and almoners' voices.

Journal article

Day G, 2019, Creating Immersive Experiences, Playful Learning: Events and Activities to Engage Adults, Editors: Whitton, Moseley, Publisher: Routledge, Pages: 99-111, ISBN: 9781138496446

Book chapter

Day G, 2016, Establishing a Pulse: Arts for Reflection, Resilience, and Resonance in STEM Education, International Journal of Social, Political, and Community Agendas in the Arts, ISSN: 2326-9960

Journal article

Day G, 2016, Establishing a Pulse: Arts for Reflection, Resilience, and Resonance in STEM Education, The International Journal of Social, Political and Community Agendas in the Arts, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 2326-9960

Journal article

Kemp SJ, Day G, 2014, Teaching medical humanities in the digital world: affordances of technology-enhanced learning, MEDICAL HUMANITIES, Vol: 40, Pages: 125-130, ISSN: 1468-215X

Journal article

Day G, 2013, Should medical students be required to study the arts? Yes, StudentBMJ, Vol: 21

Journal article

Day G, 2012, Good grief: bereavement literature for young adults and A Monster Calls, MEDICAL HUMANITIES, Vol: 38, Pages: 115-119, ISSN: 1468-215X

Journal article

Day G, 2010, A Hospital Odyssey, MEDICAL HUMANITIES, Vol: 36, Pages: 125-126, ISSN: 1468-215X

Journal article

Day G, Cuming T, 2010, Fruit for Thought, JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE, Vol: 25, Pages: 96-97, ISSN: 0884-8734

Journal article

Day G, Carter N, 2009, Christmas 2009: Professional matters Wards of the roses, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 339, ISSN: 0959-535X

Journal article

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