Imperial College London

ProfessorHelenWard

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Professor of Public Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3303h.ward Website

 
 
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Location

 

158Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

230 results found

Day S, Ward H, 1997, Sex workers and the control of sexually transmitted disease, Genitourinary Medicine, Vol: 73, Pages: 161-168, ISSN: 0266-4348

Objectives: To describe and assess measures to control sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among sex workers and their partners. Methods: A review of medical, historical and social literature, focusing on selected cases. Results: Measures to control disease in sex workers today are often prompted by concerns about HIV transmission. However, the literature shows that prostitution varies from one place and time to another, together with the risk of sexually transmitted disease. A broad social definition of prostitution rather than a narrow reference to levels of sexual activity is important for effective disease control, as an understanding of the relation between social disadvantage and sexual activity enables the provision of occupational services that sex workers actually want and use. Social prejudice and legal sanctions cause some sex workers and their partners to avoid even the most appropriate and accessible specialist services. Therefore targeted programmes can only complement, and not replace, general measures to control STDs, which are developed for other social groups or the local population as a whole. Conclusions: Sex workers and sex work differ from one place to another and so a single model for STD control is inappropriate. None the less, occupational health risks suggest a general need for specialist services. Where these do not compound the disadvantages that sex workers already suffer, medical services are likely to offer significant benefits in prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of STDs. As the stigma of prostitution leads many people to remain invisible to services, a general health infrastructure and anti-discriminatory measures will be equally important to effective disease control.

Journal article

Tichonova L, Borisenko K, Ward H, Meheus A, Gromyko A, Renton Aet al., 1997, Epidemics of syphilis in the Russian Federation: Trends, origins, and priorities for control, LANCET, Vol: 350, Pages: 210-213, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Day S, Ward H, 1997, Sex workers and the control of sexually transmitted disease, GENITOURINARY MEDICINE, Vol: 73, Pages: 161-168, ISSN: 0266-4348

Journal article

Ward H, Mertens TE, Thomas C, 1997, Health seeking behaviour and the control of sexually transmitted disease, HEALTH POLICY AND PLANNING, Vol: 12, Pages: 19-28, ISSN: 0268-1080

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Donegan C, Ward H, Day S, 1996, Services for female prostitutes in genitourinary medicine clinics in the UK, Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol: 72, Pages: 450-451, ISSN: 1368-4973

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Donegan C, Ward H, Day S, 1996, Services for female prostitutes in genitourinary medicine clinics in the UK, GENITOURINARY MEDICINE, Vol: 72, Pages: 450-451, ISSN: 0266-4348

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Ghani AC, Ison CA, Ward H, Garnett GP, Bell G, Kinghorn GR, Weber J, Day Set al., 1996, Sexual partner networks in the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases - An analysis of gonorrhea cases in Sheffield, UK, SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, Vol: 23, Pages: 498-503, ISSN: 0148-5717

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Ward H, DelaCourt A, Kitchen V, 1996, Nonoxynol-9 in lubricated condoms - Results of a study in female prostitutes, SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, Vol: 23, Pages: 413-414, ISSN: 0148-5717

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Whitaker L, Ward H, 1996, Alcohol consumption and risk of coronary heart disease - Association cannot be assumed to be causal, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 313, Pages: 365-366, ISSN: 0959-8138

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MERTENS T, CARAEL M, SATO P, CLELAND J, WARD H, SMITH GDet al., 1994, PREVENTION INDICATORS FOR EVALUATING THE PROGRESS OF NATIONAL AIDS PROGRAMS, AIDS, Vol: 8, Pages: 1359-1369, ISSN: 0269-9370

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DAY S, ISON C, WARD H, WEBER Jet al., 1993, GENETIC TECHNIQUES AND SURVEILLANCE OF TUBERCULOSIS, LANCET, Vol: 342, Pages: 1559-1560, ISSN: 0140-6736

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WARD H, DAY S, MEZZONE J, DUNLOP L, DONEGAN C, FARRAR S, WHITAKER L, HARRIS JRW, MILLER DLet al., 1993, PROSTITUTION AND RISK OF HIV - FEMALE PROSTITUTES IN LONDON, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 307, Pages: 356-358, ISSN: 0959-8138

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DAY S, WARD H, PERROTTA L, 1993, PROSTITUTION AND RISK OF HIV - MALE PARTNERS OF FEMALE PROSTITUTES, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 307, Pages: 359-361, ISSN: 0959-8138

Journal article

ALARY M, PEETERS M, LAGA M, PIOT P, VANDENHOEK A, VANDERHELM T, FENNEMA H, ROUMELIOTOU A, PAPAEVANGELOU G, KORNAROU H, WORM AM, CARDOSO J, AZEVEDO J, BRAZAO M, DAY S, WARD H, MEZZONE J, FARRAR S, MEDINA RD, ESTEBANEZ P, FITCH KM, DEVINCENZI I, ANCELLEPARK R, BRAGGIOTTI L, SCHMIDSIEGEL Bet al., 1993, HIV-INFECTION IN EUROPEAN FEMALE SEX WORKERS - EPIDEMIOLOGIC LINK WITH USE OF PETROLEUM-BASED LUBRICANTS, AIDS, Vol: 7, Pages: 401-408, ISSN: 0269-9370

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WARD H, DAY S, 1992, RECORDING HIV STATUS ON POLICE COMPUTERS, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 304, Pages: 1635-1636, ISSN: 0959-8138

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QUEEN HF, WARD H, SMITH C, WOODROFFE Cet al., 1991, WOMENS HEALTH - POTENTIAL FOR BETTER COORDINATION OF SERVICES, GENITOURINARY MEDICINE, Vol: 67, Pages: 215-219, ISSN: 0266-4348

Journal article

KITCHEN VS, DONEGAN C, WARD H, THOMAS B, HARRIS JRW, TAYLORROBINSON Det al., 1990, COMPARISON OF OFLOXACIN WITH DOXYCYCLINE IN THE TREATMENT OF NONGONOCOCCAL URETHRITIS AND CERVICAL CHLAMYDIAL INFECTION, JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMOTHERAPY, Vol: 26, Pages: 99-105, ISSN: 0305-7453

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DAY S, WARD H, HARRIS JRW, 1988, PROSTITUTE WOMEN AND PUBLIC-HEALTH, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 297, Pages: 1585-1585, ISSN: 0959-8138

Journal article

WARD H, DAY S, HARRIS JRW, BARTON Set al., 1987, WIDESPREAD USE OF CONDOMS AND LOW PREVALENCE OF SEXUALLY-TRANSMITTED DISEASES IN DANISH NONDRUG ADDICTS, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 294, Pages: 444-444, ISSN: 0959-8138

Journal article

Atchison CJ, Bowman L, Vrinten C, Redd R, Pristera P, Eaton JW, Ward Het al., Perceptions and behavioural responses of the general public during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional survey of UK Adults

<jats:p>Objective: To examine risk perceptions and behavioural responses of the UK adult population during the early phase of the COVID-19 epidemic in the UK.Design: A cross-sectional survey Setting: Conducted with a nationally representative sample of UK adults within 48 hours of the UK Government advising the public to stop non-essential contact with others and all unnecessary travel. Participants: 2,108 adults living in the UK aged 18 years and over. Data were collected between March 17 and 18 2020.Main outcome measures: Descriptive statistics for all survey questions, including the number of respondents and the weighted percentages. Logistic regression was used to identify sociodemographic variation in: (1) adoption of social-distancing measures, (2) ability to work from home, and (3) willingness and (4) ability to self-isolate. Results Overall, 1,992 (94.2%) respondents reported taking at least one preventive measure: 85.8% washed their hands with soap more frequently; 56.5% avoided crowded areas and 54.5% avoided social events. Adoption of social-distancing measures was higher in those aged over 70 compared to younger adults aged 18 to 34 years (aOR:1.9; 95% CI:1.1 to 3.4). Those with the lowest household income were six times less likely to be able to work from home (aOR:0.16; 95% CI:0.09 to 0.26) and three times less likely to be able to self-isolate (aOR:0.31; 95% CI:0.16 to 0.58). Ability to self-isolate was also lower in black and minority ethnic groups (aOR:0.47; 95% CI:0.27 to 0.82). Willingness to self-isolate was high across all respondents.Conclusions The ability to adopt and comply with certain NPIs is lower in the most economically disadvantaged in society. Governments must implement appropriate social and economic policies to mitigate this. By incorporating these differences in NPIs among socio-economic subpopulations into mathematical models of COVID-19 transmission dynamics, our modelling of epidemic outcomes and response to COVID-19 can b

Journal article

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