Imperial College London

Heather Ward

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Research Fellow
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5081heather.ward

 
 
//

Location

 

150Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

69 results found

Udeh-Momoh CT, Watermeyer T, Price G, de Jager Loots CA, Reglinska-Matveyev N, Ropacki M, Ketter N, Fogle M, Raghavan N, Arrighi M, Brashear R, Di J, Baker S, Giannakopoulou P, Robb C, Bassil D, Cohn M, McLellan-Young H, Crispin J, Lakey K, Lisa C, Chowdary Seemulamoodi Y, Kafetsouli D, Perera D, Car J, Majeed A, Ward H, Ritchie K, Perneczky R, Kivipelto M, Scott D, Bracoud L, Saad Z, Novak G, Ritchie CW, Middleton Let al., 2021, Protocol of the cognitive health in ageing register: investigational, observational and trial studies in dementia research (CHARIOT): prospective readiness cOhort (PRO) SubStudy., BMJ Open, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2044-6055

INTRODUCTION: The Cognitive Health in Ageing Register: Investigational, Observational and Trial Studies in Dementia Research (CHARIOT): Prospective Readiness cOhort (PRO) SubStudy (CPSS), sponsored by Janssen Pharmaceutical Research & Development LLC, is an Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker enriched observational study that began 3 July 2015 CPSS aims to identify and validate determinants of AD, alongside cognitive, functional and biological changes in older adults with or without detectable evidence of AD pathology at baseline. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: CPSS is a dual-site longitudinal cohort (3.5 years) assessed quarterly. Cognitively normal participants (60-85 years) were recruited across Greater London and Edinburgh. Participants are classified as high, medium (amnestic or non-amnestic) or low risk for developing mild cognitive impairment-Alzheimer's disease based on their Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status performance at screening. Additional AD-related assessments include: a novel cognitive composite, the Global Preclinical Alzheimer's Cognitive Composite, brain MRI and positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Lifestyle, other cognitive and functional data, as well as biosamples (blood, urine, and saliva) are collected. Primarily, study analyses will evaluate longitudinal change in cognitive and functional outcomes. Annual interim analyses for descriptive data occur throughout the course of the study, although inferential statistics are conducted as required. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: CPSS received ethical approvals from the London-Central Research Ethics Committee (15/LO/0711) and the Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (RPC 630/3764/33110) The study is at the forefront of global AD prevention efforts, with frequent and robust sampling of the well-characterised cohort, allowing for detection of incipient pathophysiological, cognitive and functional changes that could inform therape

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Papadimitriou N, Markozannes G, Cividini S, Kakourou A, Gill D, Rizos EC, Monori G, Ward HA, Kyrgiou M, Gunter MJ, Tsilidis KKet al., 2021, Type 2 diabetes and cancer: an umbrella review of observational and Mendelian randomisation studies, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol: 30, Pages: 1218-1228, ISSN: 1055-9965

Background Type 2 diabetes(T2DM) has been associated with an increased risk of developing several common cancers, but it is unclear whether this association is causal. We aimed to summarise the evidence on T2DM and cancer and evaluate the validity of associations from both observational and Mendelian randomisation(MR) studies. Methods We performed an umbrella review of the evidence across meta-analyses of observational studies that examined associations of T2DM with risk of developing or dying from site-specific cancers, and MR studies that explored the potential causal association of T2DM and associated biomarkers with cancer risk. Results We identified eligible observational meta-analyses that assessed associations between T2DM and cancer incidence for 18 cancer sites, cancer mortality for seven sites, and cancer incidence or mortality for four sites. Positive associations between T2DM and six cancers reached strong or highly suggestive evidence. We found eight MR studies assessing the association of genetically predicted T2DM and seven and eight studies assessing the association of genetically predicted fasting insulin or fasting glucose concentrations, respectively, upon site-specific cancers. Positive associations were found between genetically predicted T2DM and fasting insulin and risk of six cancers. There was no association between genetically predicted fasting plasma glucose and cancer except for squamous cell lung carcinoma. Conclusions We found robust observational evidence for the association between T2DM and colorectal, hepatocellular, gallbladder, breast, endometrial and pancreatic cancer. Impact Potential causal associations were identified for genetically predicted T2DM and fasting insulin concentrations and risk of endometrial, pancreas, kidney, breast, lung and cervical cancer.

Journal article

Deschasaux M, Huybrechts I, Julia C, Hercberg S, Egnell M, Srour B, Kesse-Guyot E, Latino-Martel P, Biessy C, Casagrande C, Murphy N, Jenab M, Ward HA, Weiderpass E, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Rostgaard-Hansen AL, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Mancini FR, Mahamat-Saleh Y, Kühn T, Katzke V, Bergmann MM, Schulze MB, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, Peppa E, Masala G, Agnoli C, De Magistris MS, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Boer JM, Verschuren WM, van der Schouw YT, Skeie G, Braaten T, Redondo ML, Agudo A, Petrova D, Colorado-Yohar SM, Barricarte A, Amiano P, Sonestedt E, Ericson U, Otten J, Sundström B, Wareham NJ, Forouhi NG, Vineis P, Tsilidis KK, Knuppel A, Papier K, Ferrari P, Riboli E, Gunter MJ, Touvier Met al., 2020, Association between nutritional profiles of foods underlying Nutri-Score front-of-pack labels and mortality: EPIC cohort study in 10 European countries., BMJ, Vol: 370, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1759-2151

OBJECTIVE: To determine if the Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system (FSAm-NPS), which grades the nutritional quality of food products and is used to derive the Nutri-Score front-of-packet label to guide consumers towards healthier food choices, is associated with mortality. DESIGN: Population based cohort study. SETTING: European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort from 23 centres in 10 European countries. PARTICIPANTS: 521 324 adults; at recruitment, country specific and validated dietary questionnaires were used to assess their usual dietary intakes. A FSAm-NPS score was calculated for each food item per 100 g content of energy, sugars, saturated fatty acids, sodium, fibre, and protein, and of fruit, vegetables, legumes, and nuts. The FSAm-NPS dietary index was calculated for each participant as an energy weighted mean of the FSAm-NPS score of all foods consumed. The higher the score the lower the overall nutritional quality of the diet. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Associations between the FSAm-NPS dietary index score and mortality, assessed using multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: After exclusions, 501 594 adults (median follow-up 17.2 years, 8 162 730 person years) were included in the analyses. Those with a higher FSAm-NPS dietary index score (highest versus lowest fifth) showed an increased risk of all cause mortality (n=53 112 events from non-external causes; hazard ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.10, P<0.001 for trend) and mortality from cancer (1.08, 1.03 to 1.13, P<0.001 for trend) and diseases of the circulatory (1.04, 0.98 to 1.11, P=0.06 for trend), respiratory (1.39, 1.22 to 1.59, P<0.001), and digestive (1.22, 1.02 to 1.45, P=0.03 for trend) systems. The age standardised absolute rates for all cause mortality per 10 000 persons over 10 years were 760 (men=1237; women=563) for those in the highest fifth of the FSA

Journal article

Christakoudi S, Tsilidis KK, Muller DC, Freisling H, Weiderpass E, Overvad K, Söderberg S, Häggström C, Pischon T, Dahm CC, Zhang J, Tjønneland A, Halkjær J, MacDonald C, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Mancini FR, Kühn T, Kaaks R, Schulze MB, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, Peppa E, Masala G, Pala V, Panico S, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Quirós JR, Agudo A, Sánchez M-J, Cirera L, Barricarte-Gurrea A, Amiano P, Memarian E, Sonestedt E, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, May AM, Khaw K-T, Wareham NJ, Tong TYN, Huybrechts I, Noh H, Aglago EK, Ellingjord-Dale M, Ward HA, Aune D, Riboli Eet al., 2020, ABSI (A Body Shape Index) achieves better mortality risk stratification than alternative indices of abdominal obesity: results from a large European cohort, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

Abdominal and general adiposity are independently associated with mortality, but there is no consensus on how best to assess abdominal adiposity. We compared the ability of alternative waist indices to complement body mass index (BMI) when assessing all-cause mortality. We used data from 352,985 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for other risk factors. During a mean follow-up of 16.1 years, 38,178 participants died. Combining in one model BMI and a strongly correlated waist index altered the association patterns with mortality, to a predominantly negative association for BMI and a stronger positive association for the waist index, while combining BMI with the uncorrelated A Body Shape Index (ABSI) preserved the association patterns. Sex-specific cohort-wide quartiles of waist indices correlated with BMI could not separate high-risk from low-risk individuals within underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2) or obese (BMI≥30 kg/m2) categories, while the highest quartile of ABSI separated 18%-39% of the individuals within each BMI category, which had 22%-55% higher risk of death. In conclusion, only a waist index independent of BMI by design, such as ABSI, complements BMI and enables efficient risk stratification, which could facilitate personalisation of screening, treatment and monitoring.

Journal article

Yammine S, Huybrechts I, Biessy C, Dossus L, Aglago EK, Naudin S, Ferrari P, Weiderpass E, Tjonneland A, Hansen L, Overvad K, Mancini FR, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Kvaskoff M, Fortner RT, Kaaks R, Schulze MB, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, La Vecchia C, Benetou V, Masala G, Krogh V, Mattiello A, Macciotta A, Gram IT, Skeie G, Quiros JR, Agudo A, Sanchez M-J, Chirlaque M-D, Ardanaz E, Gil L, Sartor H, Drake I, Idahl A, Lundin E, Aune D, Ward H, Merritt MA, Allen NE, Gunter MJ, Chajes Vet al., 2020, Dietary and Circulating Fatty Acids and Ovarian Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION, Vol: 29, Pages: 1739-1749, ISSN: 1055-9965

Journal article

Jakszyn P, Cayssials V, Buckland G, Perez-Cornago A, Weiderpass E, Boeing H, Bergmann MM, Vulcan A, Ohlsson B, Masala G, Cross AJ, Riboli E, Ricceri F, Dahm C, Nyvang D, Katzke VA, Kühns T, Kyrø C, Tjønneland A, Ward HA, Tsilidis KK, Skeie G, Sieri S, Sanchez MJ, Huerta JM, Amiano P, Lasheras C, Ardanaz E, Mahamat-Saleh Y, Boutron-Ruault MC, Carbonnel F, Panico S, Peppa E, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, Tumino R, Vermeulen R, Jenab M, Gunter M, Agudo Aet al., 2020, Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, International Journal of Cancer, Vol: 147, Pages: 1027-1039, ISSN: 0020-7136

Pro-inflammatory diets are associated with risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), however inconsistencies exist in subsite- and sex-specific associations. The relationship between CRC and combined lifestyle-related factors that contribute towards a low-grade inflammatory profile has not yet been explored. We examined the association between the dietary inflammatory potential and an inflammatory profile and CRC risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. This cohort included 476,160 participants followed-up of 14 years and 5,991 incident CRC cases (3,897 colon and 2,094 rectal tumours). Dietary inflammatory potential was estimated using an Inflammatory Score of the Diet (ISD). An Inflammatory Profile Score (IPS) was constructed, incorporating the ISD, physical activity level and abdominal obesity. The associations between the ISD and CRC and IPS and CRC were assessed using multivariable regression models. More pro- inflammatory diets were related to a higher CRC risk, particularly for colon cancer; Hazar Ratio (HR) for highest versus lowest ISD quartile was 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.27) for CRC, 1.24 (95% CI 1.09-1.41) for colon cancer and 0.99 (95% CI 0.83-1.17) for rectal cancer. Associations were more pronounced in men and not significant in women. The IPS was associated with CRC risk, particularly colon cancer among men; HRs for the highest versus lowest IPS were 1.62 (95% CI 1.31- 2.01) for colon cancer overall and 2.11 (95% CI 1.50-2.97) for colon cancer in men. This study shows that more pro-inflammatory diets and a more inflammatory profile are associated with higher risk of CRC, principally colon cancer and in men. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Aglago EK, Huybrechts I, Murphy N, Casagrande C, Nicolas G, Pischon T, Fedirko V, Severi G, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Fournier A, Katzke V, Kühn T, Olsen A, Tjønneland A, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Lasheras C, Agudo A, Sánchez M-J, Amiano P, Huerta JM, Ardanaz E, Perez-Cornago A, Trichopoulou A, Karakatsani A, Martimianaki G, Palli D, Pala V, Tumino R, Naccarati A, Panico S, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, May A, Derksen JWG, Hellstrand S, Ohlsson B, Wennberg M, Van Guelpen B, Skeie G, Brustad M, Weiderpass E, Cross AJ, Ward H, Riboli E, Norat T, Chajes V, Gunter MJet al., 2020, Consumption of fish and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer in a large European cohort, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol: 18, Pages: 654-666.e6, ISSN: 1542-3565

BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is an unclear association between intake of fish and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs) and colorectal cancer (CRC). We examined the association between fish consumption, dietary and circulating levels of n-3 LC-PUFAs, and ratio of n-6:n-3 LC-PUFA with CRC using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: Dietary intake of fish (total, fatty/oily, lean/white) and n-3 LC-PUFA were estimated by food frequency questionnaires given to 521,324 participants in the EPIC study; among these, 6291 individuals developed CRC (median follow up, 14.9 years). Levels of phospholipid LC-PUFA were measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples from a sub-group of 461 CRC cases and 461 matched individuals without CRC (controls). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards and conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and odds ratios (ORs), respectively, with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Total intake of fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; Ptrend=.005), fatty fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; Ptrend=.009), and lean fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.83-1.00; Ptrend=.016) were inversely associated with CRC incidence. Intake of total n-3 LC-PUFA (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.95; Ptrend=.010) was also associated with reduced risk of CRC, whereas dietary ratio of n-6:n-3 LC-PUFA was associated with increased risk of CRC (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.18-1.45; Ptrend<.001). Plasma levels of phospholipid n-3 LC-PUFA was not associated with overall CRC risk, but an inverse trend was observed for proximal compared with distal colon cancer (Pheterogeneity=.026). CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of dietary patterns of participants in the EPIC study, we found regular consumption of fish, at recommended levels, to be associated with a lower risk of CRC, possibly through exposure to n-3 LC-PUFA.

Journal article

Freisling H, Viallon V, Lennon H, Bagnardi V, Ricci C, Butterworth AS, Sweeting M, Muller D, Romieu I, Bazelle P, Kvaskoff M, Arveux P, Severi G, Bamia C, Kühn T, Kaaks R, Bergmann M, Boeing H, Tjønneland A, Olsen A, Overvad K, Dahm CC, Menéndez V, Agudo A, Sánchez M-J, Amiano P, Santiuste C, Gurrea AB, Tong TYN, Schmidt JA, Tzoulaki I, Tsilidis KK, Ward H, Palli D, Agnoli C, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Panico S, Picavet HSJ, Bakker M, Monninkhof E, Nilsson P, Manjer J, Rolandsson O, Thysell E, Weiderpass E, Jenab M, Riboli E, Vineis P, Danesh J, Wareham NJ, Gunter MJ, Ferrari Pet al., 2020, Lifestyle factors and risk of multimorbidity of cancer and cardiometabolic diseases: a multinational cohort study, BMC Medicine, Vol: 18, Pages: 5-5, ISSN: 1741-7015

BACKGROUND: Although lifestyle factors have been studied in relation to individual non-communicable diseases (NCDs), their association with development of a subsequent NCD, defined as multimorbidity, has been scarcely investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between five lifestyle factors and incident multimorbidity of cancer and cardiometabolic diseases. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 291,778 participants (64% women) from seven European countries, mostly aged 43 to 58 years and free of cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and type 2 diabetes (T2D) at recruitment, were included. Incident multimorbidity of cancer and cardiometabolic diseases was defined as developing subsequently two diseases including first cancer at any site, CVD, and T2D in an individual. Multi-state modelling based on Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of developing cancer, CVD, or T2D, and subsequent transitions to multimorbidity, in relation to body mass index (BMI), smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, and their combination as a healthy lifestyle index (HLI) score. Cumulative incidence functions (CIFs) were estimated to compute 10-year absolute risks for transitions from healthy to cancer at any site, CVD (both fatal and non-fatal), or T2D, and to subsequent multimorbidity after each of the three NCDs. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 11 years, 1910 men and 1334 women developed multimorbidity of cancer and cardiometabolic diseases. A higher HLI, reflecting healthy lifestyles, was strongly inversely associated with multimorbidity, with hazard ratios per 3-unit increment of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.81), 0.84 (0.79 to 0.90), and 0.82 (0.77 to 0.88) after cancer, CVD, and T2D, respectively. After T2D, the 10-year absolute risks of multimorbidity were 40% and 25% for men and women, respectively, with unhealthy lifestyle, and 30% and 18

Journal article

Deschasaux M, Huybrechts I, Murphy N, Julia C, Hercberg S, Srour B, Kesse-Guyot E, Latino-Martel P, Biessy C, Casagrande C, Jenab M, Ward H, Weiderpass E, Ferrari P, Riboli E, Gunter M, Touvier Met al., 2020, Prospective associations between the nutritional quality of foods consumed (graded by the FSAm-NPS underlying the Nutri-Score) and mortality in Europe, Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, Pages: E129-E129, ISSN: 0029-6651

Conference paper

Saeedi P, Petersohn I, Salpea P, Malanda B, Karuranga S, Unwin N, Colagiuri S, Guariguata L, Motala AA, Ogurtsova K, Shaw JE, Bright D, Williams R, Almutairi R, Montoya PA, Basit A, Besancon S, Bommer C, Borgnakke W, Boyko E, Chan J, Divakar H, Esteghamati A, Forouhi N, Franco L, Gregg E, Hassanein M, Ke C, Levitt D, Lim L-L, Ogle GD, Owens D, Pavkov M, Pearson-Stuttard J, Ramachandran A, Rathmann W, Riaz M, Simmons D, Sinclair A, Sobngwi E, Thomas R, Ward H, Wild S, Yang X, Yuen L, Zhang Pet al., 2019, Global and regional diabetes prevalence estimates for 2019 and projections for 2030 and 2045: Results from the International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas, 9th edition, DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, Vol: 157, ISSN: 0168-8227

Journal article

Imamura F, Schulze MB, Sharp SJ, Guevara M, Romaguera D, Bendinelli B, Salamanca-Fernández E, Ardanaz E, Arriola L, Aune D, Boeing H, Dow C, Fagherazzi G, Franks PW, Freisling H, Jakszyn P, Kaaks R, Khaw K-T, Kühn T, Mancini FR, Masala G, Chirlaque M-D, Nilsson PM, Overvad K, Pala VM, Panico S, Perez-Cornago A, Quirós JR, Ricceri F, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Rolandsson O, Sluijs I, Stepien M, Spijkerman AMW, Tjønneland A, Tong TYN, Tumino R, Vissers LET, Ward HA, Langenberg C, Riboli E, Forouhi NG, Wareham NJet al., 2019, Estimated substitution of tea or coffee for sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with lower type 2 diabetes incidence in case-cohort analysis across 8 European countries in the epic-interact study., Journal of Nutrition, Vol: 149, Pages: 1985-1993, ISSN: 1541-6100

INTRODUCTION: Beverage consumption is a modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but there is insufficient evidence to inform the suitability of substituting 1 type of beverage for another. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of T2D when consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) was replaced with consumption of fruit juice, milk, coffee, or tea. METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study of 8 European countries (n = 27,662, with 12,333 cases of incident T2D, 1992-2007), beverage consumption was estimated at baseline by dietary questionnaires. Using Prentice-weighted Cox regression adjusting for other beverages and potential confounders, we estimated associations of substituting 1 type of beverage for another on incident T2D. RESULTS: Mean ± SD of estimated consumption of SSB was 55 ± 105 g/d. Means ± SDs for the other beverages were as follows: fruit juice, 59 ± 101 g/d; milk, 209 ± 203 g/d; coffee, 381 ± 372 g/d; and tea, 152 ± 282 g/d. Substituting coffee for SSBs by 250 g/d was associated with a 21% lower incidence of T2D (95% CI: 12%, 29%). The rate difference was -12.0 (95% CI: -20.0, -5.0) per 10,000 person-years among adults consuming SSBs ≥250 g/d (absolute rate = 48.3/10,000). Substituting tea for SSBs was estimated to lower T2D incidence by 22% (95% CI: 15%, 28%) or -11.0 (95% CI: -20.0, -2.6) per 10,000 person-years, whereas substituting fruit juice or milk was estimated not to alter T2D risk significantly. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate a potential benefit of substituting coffee or tea for SSBs for the primary prevention of T2D and may help formulate public health recommendations on beverage consumption in different populations.

Journal article

Ward HA, Murphy N, Weiderpass E, Leitzmann MF, Aglago E, Gunter MJ, Freisling H, Jenab M, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Severi G, Carbonnel F, Kühn T, Kaaks R, Boeing H, Tjønneland A, Olsen A, Overvad K, Merino S, Zamora-Ros R, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Dorronsoro M, Chirlaque M-D, Barricarte A, Perez-Cornago A, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Lagiou P, Masala G, Grioni S, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Mattiello A, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Vermeulen R, Van Gils C, Nyström H, Rutegård M, Aune D, Riboli E, Cross AJet al., 2019, Gallstones and incident colorectal cancer in a large pan-European cohort study, International Journal of Cancer, Vol: 145, Pages: 1510-1516, ISSN: 0020-7136

Gallstones, a common gastrointestinal condition, can lead to several digestive complications and can result in inflammation. Risk factors for gallstones include obesity, diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity, all of which are known risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), as is inflammation. However, it is unclear whether gallstones are a risk factor for CRC. We examined the association between history of gallstones and CRC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, a prospective cohort of over half a million participants from ten European countries. History of gallstones was assessed at baseline using a self-reported questionnaire. The analytic cohort included 334,986 participants; a history of gallstones was reported by 3,917 men and 19,836 women, and incident CRC was diagnosed among 1,832 men and 2,178 women (mean follow-up: 13.6 years). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between gallstones and CRC were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by sex, study centre and age at recruitment. The models were adjusted for body mass index, diabetes, alcohol intake and physical activity. A positive, marginally significant association was detected between gallstones and CRC among women in multivariable analyses (HR = 1.14, 95%CI 0.99-1.31, p = 0.077). The relationship between gallstones and CRC among men was inverse but not significant (HR = 0.81, 95%CI 0.63-1.04, p = 0.10). Additional adjustment for details of reproductive history or waist circumference yielded minimal changes to the observed associations. Further research is required to confirm the nature of the association between gallstones and CRC by sex.

Journal article

Ward HA, Whitman J, Muller DC, Johansson M, Jakszyn P, Weiderpass E, Palli D, Fanidi A, Vermeulen R, Tjønneland A, Hansen L, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Severi G, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Affret A, Kaaks R, Fortner R, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, La Vecchia C, Kotanidou A, Berrino F, Krogh V, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Panico S, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Peeters PH, Nøst TH, Sandanger TM, Quirós JR, Agudo A, Rodríguez-Barranco M, Larrañaga N, Huerta JM, Ardanaz E, Drake I, Brunnström H, Johansson M, Grankvist K, Travis RC, Freisling H, Stepien M, Merritt MA, Riboli E, Cross AJet al., 2019, Haem iron intake and risk of lung cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 73, Pages: 1122-1132, ISSN: 1476-5640

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies suggest that haem iron, which is found predominantly in red meat and increases endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, may be positively associated with lung cancer. The objective was to examine the relationship between haem iron intake and lung cancer risk using detailed smoking history data and serum cotinine to control for potential confounding. METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 416,746 individuals from 10 countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident lung cancer (n = 3731) risk relative to haem iron, non-haem iron, and total dietary iron intake. A corresponding analysis was conducted among a nested subset of 800 lung cancer cases and 1489 matched controls for whom serum cotinine was available. RESULTS: Haem iron was associated with lung cancer risk, including after adjustment for details of smoking history (time since quitting, number of cigarettes per day): as a continuous variable (HR per 0.3 mg/1000 kcal 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.07), and in the highest versus lowest quintile (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.32; trend across quintiles: P = 0.035). In contrast, non-haem iron intake was related inversely with lung cancer risk; however, this association attenuated after adjustment for smoking history. Additional adjustment for serum cotinine did not considerably alter the associations detected in the nested case-control subset. CONCLUSIONS: Greater haem iron intake may be modestly associated with lung cancer risk.

Journal article

Ward H, McLellan H, Udeh-Momoh C, Giannakopoulou P, Robb C, Wark P, Middleton Let al., 2019, Use of online dietary recalls among older UK adults: A feasibility study of an online dietary assessment tool, Nutrients, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2072-6643

This study examined the feasibility of including myfood24, an online 24-hour dietary recall tool, in a cohort studies of older adults. Participants (n = 319) were recruited during follow-up visits for the CHARIOT-Pro Sub-study, a prospective study of cognitively healthy adults aged 60–85 years at baseline. Email invitations were sent over three consecutive months, with weekly reminders. Multivariable regression models were applied to examine the number of recalls completed in relation to technology readiness (TR) scores and demographic characteristics. Ninety-four percent of people agreed to participate. Among participants, 67% completed at least one recall, and 48% completed two or more. Participants who completed multiple recalls reported higher self-confidence with technology and received a higher TR score than those who did not complete any recalls. A one-point higher TR score was associated with higher odds of completing three recalls compared to zero recalls (OR 1.70, 95% CI 0.96–3.01); this association was further attenuated after adjustment for demographic and other TR-related covariates (OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.63–2.88). This study demonstrates reasonable participation rates for a single myfood24 recall among older adults participating in a cohort study but suggests that further support may be required to obtain multiple recalls in this population.

Journal article

Cirera L, Maria Huerta J, Dolores Chirlaque M, Overvad K, Lindstrom M, Regner S, Tjonneland A, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Rebours V, Fagherazzi G, Katzke VA, Boeing H, Peppa E, Trichopoulou A, Valanou E, Palli D, Grioni S, Panico S, Tumino R, Ricceri F, van Gils C, Vermeulen RCH, Skeie G, Braaten T, Weiderpass E, Merino S, Jose Sanchez M, Larranaga N, Ardanaz E, Sund M, Khaw K-T, Key TJ, Jenab M, Naudin S, Murphy N, Aune D, Ward H, Riboli E, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Navarro C, Duell EJet al., 2019, Socioeconomic effect of education on pancreatic cancer risk in Western Europe: an update on the EPIC cohorts study, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol: 28, Pages: 1089-1092, ISSN: 1055-9965

Background: To analyze the potential effect of social inequality on pancreatic cancer risk in Western Europe, by reassessing the association within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study, including a larger number of cases and an extended follow-up.Methods: Data on highest education attained were gathered for 459,170 participants (70% women) from 10 European countries. A relative index of inequality (RII) based on adult education was calculated for comparability across countries and generations. Cox regression models were applied to estimate relative inequality in pancreatic cancer risk, stratifying by age, gender, and center, and adjusting for known pancreatic cancer risk factors.Results: A total of 1,223 incident pancreatic cancer cases were included after a mean follow-up of 13.9 (±4.0) years. An inverse social trend was found in models adjusted for age, sex, and center for both sexes [HR of RII, 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02–1.59], which was also significant among women (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.05–1.92). Further adjusting by smoking intensity, alcohol consumption, body mass index, prevalent diabetes, and physical activity led to an attenuation of the RII risk and loss of statistical significance.Conclusions: The present reanalysis does not sustain the existence of an independent social inequality influence on pancreatic cancer risk in Western European women and men, using an index based on adult education, the most relevant social indicator linked to individual lifestyles, in a context of very low pancreatic cancer survival from (quasi) universal public health systems.Impact: The results do not support an association between education and risk of pancreatic cancer.

Journal article

Murphy N, Ward HA, Jenab M, Rothwell JA, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Carbonnel F, Kvaskoff M, Kaaks R, Kuhn T, Boeing H, Aleksandrova K, Weiderpass E, Skeie G, Borch KB, Tjønneland A, Kyrø C, Overvad K, Dahm CC, Jakszyn P, Sanchez M-JS, Gil L, Huerta JM, Barricarte A, Quiros JR, Khaw K-T, Wareham N, Bradbury KE, Trichopoulou A, La Vecchia C, Karakatsani A, Palli D, Grioni S, Tumino R, Fasanelli F, Panico S, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Peeters PH, Gylling B, Myte R, Jirstrom K, Berntsson J, Xue X, Riboli E, Cross AJ, Gunter MJet al., 2019, Heterogeneity of colorectal cancer risk factors by anatomical subsite in 10 European countries: a multinational cohort study, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol: 17, Pages: 1323-1331.e6, ISSN: 1542-3565

Background and AimsColorectal cancer located at different anatomical subsites may have distinct etiologies and risk factors. Previous studies that have examined this hypothesis have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because most have been of insufficient size to identify heterogeneous associations with precision.MethodsIn the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, we used multivariable joint Cox proportional hazards models, which accounted for tumors at different anatomical sites (proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum) as competing risks, to examine the relationships between 14 established/suspected lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive/menstrual risk factors with colorectal cancer risk. Heterogeneity across sites was tested using Wald tests.ResultsAfter 14.9 years (median) follow-up of 521,330 men and women, 6,291 colorectal cancer cases occurred. Physical activity was inversely related to proximal colon and distal colon cancer, but not to rectal cancer (P-heterogeneity=0.03). Height was positively associated with proximal and distal colon cancer only, but not rectal cancer (P-heterogeneity=0.0001). For men, but not women, heterogeneous relationships were observed for body mass index (P-heterogeneity=0.008) and waist circumference (P-heterogeneity=0.03), with weaker positive associations found for rectal cancer, compared to proximal and distal colon cancer. Current smoking was associated with a greater risk of rectal and proximal colon cancer, but not distal colon cancer (P-heterogeneity=0.05). No heterogeneity by anatomical site was found for alcohol consumption, diabetes, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and reproductive/menstrual factors.ConclusionsThe physical activity, anthropometry, and smoking relationships with colorectal cancer risk differed by subsite, supporting the hypothesis that tumors in different anatomical regions may have distinct etiologies.

Journal article

Baumeister SE, Schlesinger S, Aleksandrova K, Jochem C, Jenab M, Gunter MJ, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Carbonnel F, Fournier A, Kühn T, Kaaks R, Pischon T, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, La Vecchia C, Masala G, Panico S, Fasanelli F, Tumino R, Grioni S, de Mesquita BB, Vermeulen R, May AM, Borch KB, Oyeyemi SO, Ardanaz E, Rodríguez-Barranco M, López MDC, Felez-Nobrega M, Sonestedt E, Ohlsson B, Hemmingsson O, Werner M, Perez-Cornago A, Ferrari P, Stepien M, Freisling H, Tsilidis KK, Ward H, Riboli E, Weiderpass E, Leitzmann MFet al., 2019, Association of physical activity and risk of hepatobiliary cancers: a multinational cohort study, Journal of Hepatology, Vol: 70, Pages: 885-892, ISSN: 0168-8278

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Evidence on the association between physical activity and risk of hepatobiliary cancers is inconclusive. We examined this association in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (EPIC). METHODS: We identified 275 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases, 93 intrahepatic bile duct cancers (IHBC), and 164 non-gallbladder extrahepatic bile duct cancers (NGBC) among 467,336 EPIC participants (median follow-up 14.9 years). We estimated cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) for total physical activity and vigorous physical activity, performed mediation analysis, and secondary analyses to assess robustness to confounding (e.g., due to hepatitis virus infection). RESULTS: In the EPIC cohort, the multivariable-adjusted HR of HCC was 0.55 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.38-0.80) comparing active and inactive individuals. Regarding vigorous physical activity, for those reporting >2 hours/week compared to those with no vigorous activity, the HR for HCC was 0.50 (0.33-0.76). Estimates were similar in sensitivity analyses for confounding. Total and vigorous physical activity were unrelated to IHBC and NGBC. In mediation analysis, waist circumference explained about 40% and body mass index 30% of the overall association of total physical activity and HCC. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest an inverse association between physical activity and risk of HCC, which is potentially mediated by obesity. LAY SUMMARY: In a pan-European study of 467,336 men and women, we found that physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of developing liver cancers over the next decade. This risk was independent of other liver cancer risk factors, and did not vary by age, gender, smoking status, body weight, and alcohol consumption.

Journal article

Udeh-Momoh C, Price G, Ropacki M, Ketter N, Andrews T, Arrighi M, Brashear R, Robb C, Bassil D, Cohn M, Curry L, Su B, Perera D, Giannakopoulou P, Car J, Ward H, Perneczky R, Middleton Let al., 2019, Prospective Evaluation of Cognitive Health and Related Factors in Elderly at Risk for Developing Alzheimer’s Dementia: A Longitudinal Cohort study, The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN: 2274-5807

Journal article

Freisling H, Noh H, Slimani N, Chajès V, May AM, Peeters PH, Weiderpass E, Cross AJ, Skeie G, Jenab M, Mancini FR, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Fagherazzi G, Katzke VA, Kühn T, Steffen A, Boeing H, Tjønneland A, Kyrø C, Hansen CP, Overvad K, Duell EJ, Redondo-Sánchez D, Amiano P, Navarro C, Barricarte A, Perez-Cornago A, Tsilidis KK, Aune D, Ward H, Trichopoulou A, Naska A, Orfanos P, Masala G, Agnoli C, Berrino F, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Mattiello A, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Ericson U, Sonestedt E, Winkvist A, Braaten T, Romieu I, Sabaté Jet al., 2018, Nut intake and 5-year changes in body weight and obesity risk in adults: results from the EPIC-PANACEA study, European Journal of Nutrition, Vol: 57, Pages: 2399-2408, ISSN: 0044-264X

PURPOSE: There is inconsistent evidence regarding the relationship between higher intake of nuts, being an energy-dense food, and weight gain. We investigated the relationship between nut intake and changes in weight over 5 years. METHODS: This study includes 373,293 men and women, 25-70 years old, recruited between 1992 and 2000 from 10 European countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Habitual intake of nuts including peanuts, together defined as nut intake, was estimated from country-specific validated dietary questionnaires. Body weight was measured at recruitment and self-reported 5 years later. The association between nut intake and body weight change was estimated using multilevel mixed linear regression models with center/country as random effect and nut intake and relevant confounders as fixed effects. The relative risk (RR) of becoming overweight or obese after 5 years was investigated using multivariate Poisson regressions stratified according to baseline body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: On average, study participants gained 2.1 kg (SD 5.0 kg) over 5 years. Compared to non-consumers, subjects in the highest quartile of nut intake had less weight gain over 5 years (-0.07 kg; 95% CI -0.12 to -0.02) (P trend = 0.025) and had 5% lower risk of becoming overweight (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.98) or obese (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90-0.99) (both P trend <0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Higher intake of nuts is associated with reduced weight gain and a lower risk of becoming overweight or obese.

Journal article

Deschasaux M, Huybrechts I, Murphy N, Julia C, Hercberg S, Srour B, Kesse-Guyot E, Latino-Martel P, Biessy C, Casagrande C, Jenab M, Ward H, Weiderpass E, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Kyro C, Olsen A, Affret A, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Mahamat-Saleh Y, Kaaks R, Kuehn T, Boeing H, Schwingshackl L, Bamia C, Peppa E, Trichopoulou A, Masala G, Krogh V, Panico S, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Buen-de-Mesquita B, Peeters PH, Hjartaker A, Rylander C, Skeie G, Ramon Quiros J, Jakszyn P, Salamanca-Fernandez E, Maria Huerta J, Ardanaz E, Amiano P, Ericson U, Sonestedt E, Huseinovic E, Johansson I, Khaw K-T, Wareham N, Bradbury KE, Perez-Cornago A, Tsilidis KK, Ferrari P, Riboli E, Gunter MJ, Touvier Met al., 2018, Nutritional quality of food as represented by the FSAm-NPS nutrient profiling system underlying the Nutri-Score label and cancer risk in Europe: results from the EPIC prospective cohort study, PLoS Medicine, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1549-1277

BackgroundHelping consumers make healthier food choices is a key issue for the prevention of cancer and other diseases. In many countries, political authorities are considering the implementation of a simplified labelling system to reflect the nutritional quality of food products. The Nutri-Score, a five-colour nutrition label, is derived from the Nutrient Profiling System of the British Food Standards Agency (modified version) (FSAm-NPS). How the consumption of foods with high/low FSAm-NPS relates to cancer risk has been studied in national/regional cohorts but has not been characterized in diverse European populations.Methods and findingsThis prospective analysis included 471,495 adults from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, 1992–2014, median follow-up: 15.3 y), among whom there were 49,794 incident cancer cases (main locations: breast, n = 12,063; prostate, n = 6,745; colon-rectum, n = 5,806). Usual food intakes were assessed with standardized country-specific diet assessment methods. The FSAm-NPS was calculated for each food/beverage using their 100-g content in energy, sugar, saturated fatty acid, sodium, fibres, proteins, and fruits/vegetables/legumes/nuts. The FSAm-NPS scores of all food items usually consumed by a participant were averaged to obtain the individual FSAm-NPS Dietary Index (DI) scores. Multi-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were computed. A higher FSAm-NPS DI score, reflecting a lower nutritional quality of the food consumed, was associated with a higher risk of total cancer (HRQ5 versus Q1 = 1.07; 95% CI 1.03–1.10, P-trend < 0.001). Absolute cancer rates in those with high and low (quintiles 5 and 1) FSAm-NPS DI scores were 81.4 and 69.5 cases/10,000 person-years, respectively. Higher FSAm-NPS DI scores were specifically associated with higher risks of cancers of the colon-rectum, upper aerodigestive tract and stomach, lung for men, and liver and postmenopausal breast for women (all

Journal article

Ward HA, Gayle A, Jakszyn P, Merritt M, Melin B, Freisling H, Weiderpass E, Tjonneland A, Olsen A, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Katzke V, Kühn T, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Kyrozis A, Palli D, Krogh V, Tumino R, Ricceri F, Mattiello A, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Peeters PH, Quirós JR, Agudo A, Rodriguez-Barranco M, Larrañaga N, Huerta JM, Barricarte A, Sonestedt E, Drake I, Sandström M, Travis RC, Ferrari P, Riboli E, Cross AJet al., 2018, Meat and haem iron intake in relation to glioma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, European Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol: 27, Pages: 379-383, ISSN: 1473-5709

Diets high in red or processed meat have been associated positively with some cancers, and several possible underlying mechanisms have been proposed, including iron-related pathways. However, the role of meat intake in adult glioma risk has yielded conflicting findings because of small sample sizes and heterogeneous tumour classifications. The aim of this study was to examine red meat, processed meat and iron intake in relation to glioma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. In this prospective cohort study, 408 751 individuals from nine European countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine intake of red meat, processed meat, total dietary iron and haem iron in relation to incident glioma. During an average follow-up of 14.1 years, 688 incident glioma cases were diagnosed. There was no evidence that any of the meat variables (red, processed meat or subtypes of meat) or iron (total or haem) were associated with glioma; results were unchanged when the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded. This study suggests that there is no association between meat or iron intake and adult glioma. This is the largest prospective analysis of meat and iron in relation to glioma and as such provides a substantial contribution to a limited and inconsistent literature.

Journal article

Aleksandrova K, Jenab M, Leitzmann M, Bueno-d-Mesquita B, Kaaks R, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Lagiou P, Rinaldi S, Freisling H, Carayol M, Pischon T, Drogan D, Weiderpass E, Jakszyn P, Overvad K, Dahm CC, Tjonneland A, Bouton-Ruault M-C, Kuhn T, Peppa E, Valanou E, La Vecchia C, Palli D, Panico S, Sacerdote C, Agnoli C, Tumino R, May A, van Vulpen J, Benjaminsen Borch K, Oluwafemi Oyeyemi S, Quiros JR, Bonet C, Sanchez M-J, Dorronsoro M, Navarro C, Barricarte A, van Guelpen B, Wennberg P, Key TJ, Khaw K-T, Wareham N, Assi N, Ward HA, Aune D, Riboli E, Boeing Het al., 2017, Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer:insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from theEPIC Cohort, International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 46, Pages: 1823-1835, ISSN: 1464-3685

Background: There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account for the association between physical activity and colon cancer.Methods: We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort of 519 978 men and women aged 25 to 70 years followed from 1992 to 2003. A total of 713 incident colon cancer cases were matched, using risk-set sampling, to 713 controls on age, sex, study centre, fasting status and hormonal therapy use. The amount of total physical activity during the past year was expressed in metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-h/week. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected at study baseline.Results: High physical activity was associated with a lower risk of colon cancer: relative risk ≥91 MET-h/week vs <91 MET-h/week = 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57 to 0.96]. In mediation analyses, this association was accounted for by waist circumference: proportion explained effect (PEE) = 17%; CI: 4% to 52%; and the biomarkers soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R): PEE = 15%; 95% CI: 1% to 50% and 5-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D): PEE = 30%; 95% CI: 12% to 88%. In combination, these factors explained 45% (95% CI: 20% to 125%) of the association. Beyond waist circumference, sOB-R and 25[OH]D additionally explained 10% (95% CI: 1%; 56%) and 23% (95% CI: 6%; 111%) of the association, respectively.Conclusions: Promoting physical activity, particularly outdoors, and maintaining metabolic health and adequate vitamin D levels could represent a promising strategy for colon cancer prevention.

Journal article

Lu Y, Zamora-Ros R, Chan S, Cross AJ, Ward H, Jakszyn P, Luben R, Opstelten JL, Oldenburg B, Hallmans G, Karling P, Grip O, Key T, Bergmann MM, Boeing H, Overvad K, Palli D, Masala G, Khaw K-T, Racine A, Carbonnel F, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Andersen V, Olsen A, Tjonneland A, Kaaks R, Tumino R, Trichopoulou A, Scalbert A, Riboli E, Hart ARet al., 2017, Dietary Polyphenols in the Aetiology of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis-A Multicenter European Prospective Cohort Study (EPIC)., Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol: 23, Pages: 2072-2082, ISSN: 1078-0998

BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress may be involved in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease and whether dietary polyphenols, which possess antioxidants properties, prevent its development is unknown. METHODS: A total of 401,326 men and women aged 20 to 80 years from 8 countries were recruited between 1991 and 1998 and at baseline completed validated food frequency questionnaires. Dietary polyphenol intake was measured using Phenol-Explorer, a database with information on the content of 502 polyphenols. Incident cases of Crohn's diseases (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were identified during the follow-up period of up to December 2010. A nested case-control study using conditional logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals, for polyphenol intake (categories based on quartiles) and developing CD or UC. RESULTS: In total, 110 CD (73% women) and 244 UC (57% women) cases were identified and matched to 440 and 976 controls, respectively. Total polyphenol intake was not associated with CD (P trend = 0.17) or UC (P trend = 0.16). For flavones and CD, there were reduced odds for all quartiles, which were statistically significant for the third (OR3rd versus 1st quartile = 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.69) and there was an inverse trend across quartiles (P = 0.03). Similarly, for resveratrol, there was an inverse association with CD (OR4th versus 1st quartile = 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.82) with an inverse trend across quartiles (P = 0.02). No significant associations between subtypes of polyphenols and UC were found. Effect modification by smoking in CD was documented with borderline statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The data supports a potential role of flavones and resveratrol in the risk of developing CD; future aetiological studies should investigate these dietary components and further examine the potential for residual confounding.

Journal article

Perez-Cornago A, Appleby PN, Pischon T, Tsilidis KK, Tjonneland A, Olsen A, Overvad K, Kaaks R, Kuhn T, Boeing H, Steffen A, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Kritikou M, Krogh V, Palli D, Sacerdote C, Tumino R, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Agudo A, Larranaga N, Molina-Portillo E, Barricarte A, Chirlaque MD, Ramon Quiros J, Stattin P, Haggstrom C, Wareham N, Khaw KT, Schmidt JA, Gunter M, Freisling H, Aune D, Ward H, Riboli E, Key TJ, Travis RCet al., 2017, Tall height and obesity are associated with an increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer: results from the EPIC cohort study, BMC Medicine, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1741-7015

BackgroundThe relationship between body size and prostate cancer risk, and in particular risk by tumour characteristics, is not clear because most studies have not differentiated between high-grade or advanced stage tumours, but rather have assessed risk with a combined category of aggressive disease. We investigated the association of height and adiposity with incidence of and death from prostate cancer in 141,896 men in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.MethodsMultivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After an average of 13.9 years of follow-up, there were 7024 incident prostate cancers and 934 prostate cancer deaths.ResultsHeight was not associated with total prostate cancer risk. Subgroup analyses showed heterogeneity in the association with height by tumour grade (P heterogeneity = 0.002), with a positive association with risk for high-grade but not low-intermediate-grade disease (HR for high-grade disease tallest versus shortest fifth of height, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.18–2.03). Greater height was also associated with a higher risk for prostate cancer death (HR = 1.43, 1.14–1.80). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly inversely associated with total prostate cancer, but there was evidence of heterogeneity by tumour grade (P heterogeneity = 0.01; HR = 0.89, 0.79–0.99 for low-intermediate grade and HR = 1.32, 1.01–1.72 for high-grade prostate cancer) and stage (P heterogeneity = 0.01; HR = 0.86, 0.75–0.99 for localised stage and HR = 1.11, 0.92–1.33 for advanced stage). BMI was positively associated with prostate cancer death (HR = 1.35, 1.09–1.68). The results for waist circumference were generally similar to those for BMI, but the associations were slightly stronger

Journal article

Al-Dabhani K, Tsilidis K, Murphy N, Ward H, Elliot P, Riboli E, Gunter M, Tzoulaki Iet al., 2017, Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and association with metabolic syndrome in a Qatari population, Nutrition and Diabetes, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2044-4052

Background/ObjectivesDespite long hours of sunlight in Qatar and other regions of the Middle East, vitamin D deficiency has been rising. In parallel, the prevalence metabolic syndrome has also been increasing in Qatar. Vitamin D levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome but data are inconsistent and no studies have addressed these inter-relationships in a Middle Eastern population where the prevalence of these conditions is high. The objective is to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with metabolic syndrome and its components in the Qatar Biobank population.Subjects/MethodsA cross-sectional study of 1 205 participants (702 women and 503 men) from the Qatar Biobank, comprising Qataris and non-Qataris between the ages of 18 to 80 years, was used to perform multivariate linear regression analyses to examine the association between metabolic syndrome and prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (defined as <20 ng/mL serum vitamin D levels) adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, season of blood collection, physical activity, and education. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all analyses. ResultsApproximately 64% of participants were vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/mL) with more men being deficient (68.6%) than women (61.3%). Serum vitamin D was 8% lower in individuals with metabolic syndrome (RR: 0.92, 95%CI: 0.87 – 0.98, p-value: 0.01) compared to individuals without metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference and HDL as well as high triglyceride levels were also significantly positively associated with vitamin D deficiency. No association was found between the other components of metabolic syndrome or diabetes and the presence of vitamin D deficiency. ConclusionsVitamin D deficiency is prevalent in this Qatari population. Presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with presence of vitamin D deficiency. Future prospective studies need to be conducted to investigate the potential for causality.

Journal article

Sawada N, Wark PA, Merritt MA, Tsugane S, Ward HA, Rinaldi S, Weiderpass E, Dartois L, Boutron-Ruault MC, His M, Turzanski-Fortner R, Kaaks R, Overvad K, Redondo ML, Travier N, Molina-Portillo E, Dorronsoro M, Cirera L, Ardanaz E, Perez-Cornago A, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Valanou E, Masala G, Pala V, Peeters PHM, van der Schouw YT, Melander O, Manjer J, da Silva M, Skeie G, Tjonneland A, Olsen A, Gunter MJ, Riboli E, Cross AJet al., 2017, The association between adult attained height and sitting height with mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), PLOS One, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1932-6203

Adult height and sitting height may reflect genetic and environmental factors, including early life nutrition, physical and social environments. Previous studies have reported divergent associations for height and chronic disease mortality, with positive associations observed for cancer mortality but inverse associations for circulatory disease mortality. Sitting height might be more strongly associated with insulin resistance; however, data on sitting height and mortality is sparse. Using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, a prospective cohort of 409,748 individuals, we examined adult height and sitting height in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Height was measured in the majority of participants; sitting height was measured in ~253,000 participants. During an average of 12.5 years of follow-up, 29,810 deaths (11,931 from cancer and 7,346 from circulatory disease) were identified. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for death were calculated using multivariable Cox regression within quintiles of height. Height was positively associated with cancer mortality (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.00–1.24; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 1.17, 95%CI = 1.07–1.28). In contrast, height was inversely associated with circulatory disease mortality (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.63, 95%CI = 0.56–0.71; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.70–0.93). Although sitting height was not associated with cancer mortality, it was inversely associated with circulatory disease (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.64, 95%CI = 0.55–0.75; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.49–0.74) and respiratory disease mortality (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.45, 95%CI = 0.28–0.71; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.40–0.89). We observed opposing effects of height on cancer and circulatory disease mortality. Sitting height was inversely associated with circulatory disease and respiratory disease mortality.

Journal article

Ward HA, Wark PA, Muller DC, Steffen A, Johansson M, Norat T, Gunter MJ, Overvad K, Dahm CC, Halkjaer J, Tjønneland A, Boutron-Ruault MC, Fagherazzi G, Mesrine S, Brennan P, Freisling H, Li K, Kaaks R, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Panico S, Grioni S, Tumino R, Vineis P, Palli D, Peeters PHM, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Weiderpass E, Agudo A, Ramon Quiros J, Larrañaga N, Ardanaz E, Huerta JM, Sánchez MJ, Laurell G, Johansson I, Westin U, Wallstrom P, Bradbury KE, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT, Pearson C, Boeing H, Riboli Eet al., 2017, Measured adiposity in relation to head and neck cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol: 26, Pages: 895-904, ISSN: 1538-7755

Background: Emerging evidence from cohort studies indicates that adiposity is associated with greater incidence of head and neck cancer (HNC). However, most studies have used self-reported anthropometry which is prone to error. Methods: Among 363 094 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC) with measured anthropometry, there were 837 incident cases of HNC. HNC risk was examined in relation to body mass index (BMI) [lean: < 22.5 kg/m2, normal weight (reference): 22.5-24.9 kg/m2, overweight 25-29.9 kg/m2, obese: > 30 kg/m2], waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Among men, a BMI < 22.5 kg/m2 was associated with higher HNC risk [hazard ratio (HR) 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23 - 2.12)]; BMI was not associated with HNC among women. WC and WHR were associated with greater risk of HNC among women, (WC per 5 cm: HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 - 1.15; WHR per 0.1 unit: HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.38 - 1.93). After stratification by smoking status, the association for WHR was present only among smokers (p interaction 0.004). Among men, WC and WHR were associated with HNC only upon additional adjustment for BMI (WC per 5 cm: HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07 - 1.26; WHR per 0.1 unit: HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.21 - 1.65). Conclusion: Central adiposity, particularly among women, may have a stronger association with HNC risk than previously estimated. Impact: Strategies to reduce obesity may beneficially impact HNC incidence.

Journal article

Molina-Montes E, Sánchez M, Buckland G, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Weiderpass E, Amiano P, Wark PA, Kuhn T, Katzke V, Huerta JM, Ardanaz E, Ramón Quirós J, Affret A, His M, Boutron- Ruault M, Peeters PH, Ye W, Sund M, Boeing H, Iqbal K, Ohlsson B, Sonestedt E, Tjonneland A, Petersen KEN, Travis RC, Skeie G, Agnoli C, Agnoli C, Panico S, Palli D, Tumino R, Sacerdote C, Freisling H, Huybrechts I, Overvad K, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Vasilopoulou E, Wareham N, Khaw K, Cross AJ, Ward HA, Riboli E, Duell EJet al., 2017, Mediterranean Diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, British Journal of Cancer, Vol: 116, Pages: 811-820, ISSN: 1532-1827

Background:The Mediterranean Diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Methods: Over half a million participants from 10 European countries were followed-up for over11 years, after which 865 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted score without the alcohol component (arMED) to discount alcohol-related harmful effects. Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by age, sex and center, and adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, alcohol intake and diabetes status at recruitment, were used to estimate hazardratios (HRs) associated with pancreatic cancer and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals 16 (CIs) . Results: Adherence to the arMED score was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR high versus low adherence = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, and HR per increments of 2 units in adherence to arMED = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.94-1.06). There was no convincing evidence for heterogeneity by smoking status, BMI, diabetes or European region. There was also no evidence of significant associations in analyses involving microscopically confirmed cases, plausible reporters of energy intake, or other definitions of the MD pattern.Conclusion: A high adherence to the MD is not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC study.

Journal article

Udeh-Momoh CT, Price G, Su B, Benjamin M, O'Driscoll C, Robb C, Bassil D, Ward H, Perneczky R, Middleton Let al., 2016, THE CHARIOT COGNITIVE RESERVE COMPOSITE: A CONSTRUCT AND PREDICTIVE VALIDITY STUDY, The 13th International Conference on Alxheimer's and Parkinson's Disease

Conference paper

Fanidi A, Muller DC, Midttun Ø, Ueland PM, Vollset SE, Relton C, Vineis P, Weiderpass E, Skeie G, Brustad M, Palli D, Tumino R, Grioni S, Sacerdote C, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Peeters PH, Boutron-Ruault MC, Kvaskoff M, Cadeau C, Huerta JM, Sánchez MJ, Agudo A, Lasheras C, Quirós JR, Chamosa S, Riboli E, Travis RC, Ward H, Murphy N, Khaw KT, Trichopoulou A, Lagiou P, Papatesta EM, Boeing H, Kuehn T, Katzke V, Steffen A, Johansson A, Brennan P, Johansson Met al., 2016, Circulating vitamin D in relation to cancer incidence and survival of the head and neck and oesophagus in the EPIC cohort, Scientific Reports, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2045-2322

Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D play a role in pathogenesis and progression of cancer, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000. This analysis includes 497 case-control pairs of the head and neck and oesophagus, as well as 443 additional controls. Circulating 25(OH)D3 were measured in pre-diagnostic samples and evaluated in relation to HNC and oesophagus cancer risk and post-diagnosis all-cause mortality. After controlling for risk factors, a doubling of 25(OH)D3 was associated with 30% lower odds of HNC (OR 0.70, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.56-0.88, Ptrend = 0.001). Subsequent analyses by anatomical sub-site indicated clear inverse associations with risk of larynx and hypopharynx cancer combined (OR 0.55, 95CI% 0.39-0.78) and oral cavity cancer (OR 0.60, 95CI% 0.42-0.87). Low 25(OH)D3 concentrations were also associated with higher risk of death from any cause among HNC cases. No clear association was seen with risk or survival for oesophageal cancer. Study participants with elevated circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 had decreased risk of HNC, as well as improved survival following diagnosis.

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00718614&limit=30&person=true